Search the forums

Loading

Adding a roof over my deck

John_Bryer's picture

*
I built a large deck (32 x 13) last year that I now would like to add a roof to. I'm thinking about a gable roof with the gable right in the middle. Does anyone have any advice or a web site that can give me some info on building this so that it doesn't become a big kite and fly off of my house. I've attached a picture so you can get an idea of what I'm trying to do. As you can see, I've added some 4x4 posts for support of the roof when I built the deck.

(post #171455, reply #6 of 21)

*
I agree with Pete. Also another concern that would have to be addressed is the additional load on the footings; probably OK, but wouldn't you really want to know? The gable would look terrible, the low slope shed less so, but it would still be dark in there... go with some bright umbrellas or awning system.

(post #171455, reply #9 of 21)

*
Thanks for all of the advice. The 4x4 posts are actually bolted to the beam below (the beam is 2 2x8's that are bolted together). I was afraid that they would not be able to withstand the weight of the roof. The main reason for wanting a roof is because of all of the bird droppings from the trees. I guess all of the trees will have to go. What problems might I face if we just built a trelace/arbor (is that the right terminology?) over the deck and bolted it to the house and to the 4x4 posts? Would that put too much weight on the deck supports? The lower posts are 6x6.

You can't see it, but we used Trex for the deck boards. What great stuff. It really has worked out well.

(post #171455, reply #19 of 21)

*
I built a large deck (32 x 13) last year that I now would like to add a roof to. I'm thinking about a gable roof with the gable right in the middle. Does anyone have any advice or a web site that can give me some info on building this so that it doesn't become a big kite and fly off of my house. I've attached a picture so you can get an idea of what I'm trying to do. As you can see, I've added some 4x4 posts for support of the roof when I built the deck.

(post #171455, reply #1 of 21)

*
John:

From the picture, it looks like your joists are cantilevered out over a drop girder (beam). Your 4x4 roof support posts must bear down directly over the girder, with solid wood between the post bottom and the girder top. What size is that girder? How is it positioned in relation to your 4x4 roof supports? Also you need girders (beams) on either side of the deck, and very possibly additional posts/footings. A 13' span is probably going to be too much. Sorry dude - it's never simple - is it?

(post #171455, reply #2 of 21)

*
John,

What about a shed roof. You could have a beam directly over the deck girder. Depending on your roof pitch, you should be able to get away with a 14'-15' rafter. Maybe throw a couple of skylight in to keep it bright in there.

'course this is just my opinion

pm

(post #171455, reply #3 of 21)

*
Hi John,

As Matt pointed out, you have a couple of structural concerns with your deck, enough said.

With regards to a roof.

You have windows on the upper level of your home that you would not want to block out. This means that the roof would have to be low or no pitch, if you want to maintain any type of height clearance on your deck for entertaining etc.

Given the possibilities of not wanting to add any more loading on this deck than absolutely needed, you may want to consider a roll up canopy type awning.

I beleive that your deck is on the shaded part of your home. You may want to open this area up once in a while to dry out.

Just a thought,

Gabe

(post #171455, reply #4 of 21)

*
STEP 1. Cut down tall posts and cap to match existing others.

STEP 2. Buy a nice outdoor table set with a large umbrella.

STEP 3. Be glad you didn't waste time and money on a project that would be a nightmare and an unappealing and possibly depreciating addition to your home.

Honestly,
Pete Draganic

(post #171455, reply #5 of 21)

*
John,

It looks like you did a nice job on what you did. Often times when I go on a deck estimate this is what people have in mind. I talk them out of it. I also ask them what they are going to do on their deck. I try and design a deck much in the same way you design a floor plan, and add interest by varying the footprint. Multiple levels and access to the yard are also good things.

Ditto what the others have said here regarding structure, and roof design. Honestly, think about the awning or or putting a roof over part of it. Come to terms with the fact that you have a cumbersome, uninteresting, 2nd story tennis court of a deck. Get some referrals from a good deck contractor in your area and pay him for his advice and hopefully is labor to construct a more appealing and useful outdoor living area. Pay him extra and maybe he'll let you help.

Tom

(post #171455, reply #7 of 21)

*

(post #171455, reply #8 of 21)

*
Well sure. If he wanted to do it in magic marker I guess it would look fine. Somehow I think the actual wood type won't fit in so swell.

Pete

(post #171455, reply #10 of 21)

*
hey Ryan,

Come over here and clean this magic marker off my screen now.

John,

I think the advice siting the shading on this side of the house is pretty good advice. Look at Ryan's pic, and imagine the same shadows under the deck, but on the second level. Just a bit too much darkness for one house if you ask me. A few big umbrellas and some light colors would do a lot for the resale value.

(post #171455, reply #11 of 21)

*
Look into some of those electric awnings. Expensive, but still much cheaper than the roof. I managed to get one for free, and love it. Too sunny... flick a switch... light rain... flick a switch. IT bolts right to the wall, and has nothing to obstruct your view when out. As far as the bird sh*t, I think both Winchester, and Remington make something for that. Just KIDDING... well maybe not

(post #171455, reply #12 of 21)

*
I did a bid for a roof over a deck recently. When I gave them the price, they said "That's cheaper than the awning we were looking at.

I don't know what awnings cost but apparently more than I had imagined.

(post #171455, reply #13 of 21)

*
The one I have was around $5000. It's 14-15 ft wide, and extends about 12 or so feet. It had been used about 3 times. I friends parents had it, and the sold the house to move to assisted living. They told me if I wanted it to come take it off, and bring it home.

(post #171455, reply #14 of 21)

*
Hi Ryan,

Don't it make you want to double check your quote?

Gabe

(post #171455, reply #15 of 21)

*
Actually, I'm considering pricing these things and running an ad that compares the cost of a flimsy, sun worn, weather tattered, fabric awning with the cost of a "real" roof with "real" shingles, and "real" screens,and "real" gutters built by a "real" carpenter.

Maybe I will.

(post #171455, reply #16 of 21)

*
Ryan, that would be "real" good.

Gabe

(post #171455, reply #17 of 21)

*
Really !!

(post #171455, reply #18 of 21)

*
yeah, for real!

(post #171455, reply #20 of 21)

*
I bought one of those awnings with an electric motor -- goes out and back up by itself -- use it all the time and sometimes just need 4 or 6 feet to block the sun off the patio -- installed 12x19 with the motor was $3,500

They are wonderful because they let light into that side of the house when the thing is not out and is inviting to go out on the patio becuse it looks shady and cool on a hot day.

price quote (post #171455, reply #21 of 21)

i just quoted a 14 x 20 roof deck... $4400

thats about $17/sf

good luck