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mounting ceiling fan on steep sloped ...

david_rettig's picture

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Does anyone have a simple solution to intstall a ceiling fan on a steep sloped ceiling? Or does anyone know if adaptors are readily available? Ceiling is pitched at 12 - 12

(post #169584, reply #9 of 9)

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Does anyone have a simple solution to intstall a ceiling fan on a steep sloped ceiling? Or does anyone know if adaptors are readily available? Ceiling is pitched at 12 - 12

(post #169584, reply #1 of 9)

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Depending on WHERE on the ceiling you are installing the fan, adapters (i.e. longer downrods) are available wherever the ceiling fans are sold.

The closer to the peak you get, the longer the rod needed.

Unless you are installing top of the line (and expensive) fans, the longer the downrod, the more wobble and vibration you are likely to see. If these are in your house, it's your choice. If installing in a client's house, they may object to the wobble, and want it taken care of.

Just my thoughts...

James DuHamel

(post #169584, reply #2 of 9)

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Funny, one mfr I've used claims that longer downrods are MORE stable. The theory -- true in physics anyway -- is that the pendulum frequency is slower the longer it gets. Best thing of is to get a good quality fan and balance it so it doesn't tour the room. I guess this consistent with what James says.

You'll need a sloped ceiling canopy, too. Hampton Bay or Hunter fans at HD, both highly rated by Consumer Reports, will work, among many others (casablanca, etc.). Don't cheap out on the fan, no matter what.

(post #169584, reply #3 of 9)

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You can always make a box to attach to the ceiling. angle it so that the bottom is level, then attach the fan to this.

Rick Tuk

(post #169584, reply #4 of 9)

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True if fans only wobbled at the natural pendulum frequency.

With ceiling fans, the imbalance creates a torque around the hanger. The longer the lever (down rod), the larger the torque, the more "wobble".

(post #169584, reply #5 of 9)

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You could also run a beam across from one angled side to the other and hang it from there. Just food for thought.

Pete Draganic

(post #169584, reply #6 of 9)

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I've installed a couple of fans in cathedral ceilings. One was in old constuction (remod). I used a bracket(from HD) that fits into the box hole and expands between the rafters. Very strong. The other was new construction, used a box that had a rafter flange built into it, also very strong and from HD. Both required an optional hanger pipe to get the clearance from the sloped ceiling. I use the minimum length I can get away with. Both fans I used were Hampton Bay, and were very nicely balanced. There is virtualy no wobble on either.

(post #169584, reply #7 of 9)

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"precession"?

(post #169584, reply #8 of 9)

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Respectfully disagree regarding "minimum length" hanger pipe ... if blade tips are too close to the lower section of the sloped ceiling, the fan may want to sway because of aerodynamic unbalancing at the blade tips. Then precession can set in (conservation of angular momentum) and things can get out of hand. Balancing with weights won't cure the problem. (Of course, it's essential to maintain minimum floor-to-fan clearance.)

I like Hunter originals. An angle mount is available, and the extra bucks for the fan is money well spent. Have installed four in cathedral ceilings with no problems.

Regards, Steve