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NMD VS NM-B Wire and the Electrical c...

Just_Another_Guy's picture

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I live in Canada, and on a recent trip to the States I picked up some Romex wire to rewire my House (shack... well; Shed... maybe shoe box) so that I can get insurance on it to live in it while I build a real house.

Anyway, I hit a great deal on some 12-3 NM-B wire that I was going to use to wire the split duplex receptacles in the kitchen. Then, reading through the "Electrical code Simplified" I noticed that it never mentions NM-B wire anywhere. Is there a difference between NM-B wire and NMD, and should I expect trouble from the inspector if the wire doesn't have the Canadian UL symbol on it (It has the US symbol on the box)? and (lotsa questions here) will the inspector give me a hard time if the wire size etc. isn't marked on the casing, only on the box it came in??

I can return the stuff on my next trip to the States (next week) and I'm beginning to think that the savings won't be so great if I have to tear out all the wiring in 2 weeks.

(post #162679, reply #1 of 8)

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Don't piss around with opinions, phone the Hydro and ask.

(post #162679, reply #2 of 8)

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In the U.S. the "B" in NM-B refers to the temperature rating (90 degrees Celsius I believe).

In Canada, the "D" stands for either "dry" or "damp", but not "wet" (which has a "W"). NMD90 Canadian should match NM-B in the U.S.

Are you sure the wire type and gauge isn't marked on the wire itself? It may be be embossed rather than printed. Look again. Or maybe that's why you got the good price.. :)

Click here for a website that may have some information you can use.

And after you've got the facts, do what Phill advised: ask the inspector before you run the wire.

(post #162679, reply #3 of 8)

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As Ted said, it is supposed to be marked but if it's embossed it can be very difficult to see.

Jerry

(post #162679, reply #4 of 8)

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Any electrical wire or devices installed in Canada MUST have a CSA (Canadian Standards Association)approval sticker, if it dosn't the the only recourse is to call your local inspector and he will set someone from the CSA office to inspect and stamp the questionable parts. I hardly think it is worth your time and expense unless they see a lot of that wire migrating into your neck of the woods

(post #162679, reply #5 of 8)

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Are you sure you want #12 wire? #14 will carry the 15 amps a receptacle normally takes, and it will fit into push in holes in the back (#12 won't)

(post #162679, reply #6 of 8)

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Glen

Those back stab connections are poor and should be outlawed.

Also it is in general a better desgin to have 20 amp branch circuits. It is required, by code, in certain applications (kitchens, bath, and washer).

(post #162679, reply #7 of 8)

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This is a Canadian kitchen installation. That means: #12, split receptacles, and every circuit gets its own breaker.

(post #162679, reply #8 of 8)

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I live in Canada, and on a recent trip to the States I picked up some Romex wire to rewire my House (shack... well; Shed... maybe shoe box) so that I can get insurance on it to live in it while I build a real house.

Anyway, I hit a great deal on some 12-3 NM-B wire that I was going to use to wire the split duplex receptacles in the kitchen. Then, reading through the "Electrical code Simplified" I noticed that it never mentions NM-B wire anywhere. Is there a difference between NM-B wire and NMD, and should I expect trouble from the inspector if the wire doesn't have the Canadian UL symbol on it (It has the US symbol on the box)? and (lotsa questions here) will the inspector give me a hard time if the wire size etc. isn't marked on the casing, only on the box it came in??

I can return the stuff on my next trip to the States (next week) and I'm beginning to think that the savings won't be so great if I have to tear out all the wiring in 2 weeks.