Search the forums

Loading

POZZI WINDOWS

John_Napoli's picture

*
Has anyone had experience using Pozzi windows? We're getting mixed opinions from contractors who have used their windows. One told us that they all fogged up. A call to corporate told us that their "insulated divided lites" had problems and were discontinued Dec 99. Apparently they are now using what they call a "capillary" or "breather" hole to vent moisture; they say that "all" gas-filled windows leak after about 5 years.

(post #171435, reply #2 of 7)

*
not a fan of pozzi here either,i do a lot of restoration painting and found myself on a job where, according to the contractor, pozzi sold sashes and tracks only (no frames) to a homeowner as the best possible restoration for their 230 yr. old home.....i saw the bill.....money was ill spent by the homeowner and the "contractor" is still cutting wedges and rabbits to make these abortions fit and sit......
2 years out only 2or 3 of 27 leak
though my over the counter pella and the andersons i installed 6 yrs ago are still fine,,,,,

(post #171435, reply #5 of 7)

*
I just read a good article about capillary breather tubes in the April issue of Environmental Building News (http://www.buildinggreen.com). According to the article, window manufactures have started to install the tubes because they were having problems with seal leaking and glass breakage due to elevation changes during shipping. If a window is shipped over mountains or manufactured at a different elevation (as little as 1000 ft difference) the glass deflects enough to compromise the seal or break. Thicker glass, smaller lites, and smaller spaces between the panes help keep this from being a problem.

The capillary tubes solve the breakage problem by equalizing the pressure, but they create new problems. Obviously the gas leaks out of a gas filled window, and you're left with the performance of an air filled window. Moisture also travels into the window thru the tube. Then it can condense between the panes. The first tubes were about 1/8" diameter. Now they are .021". Some manufacturers say their windows won't fog because the tubes are so small, but the tubes definately are not put in to vent moisture.

Some manufactures using tubes require them to be crimped when the windows arrive at the site. This seems to be an improvement if you can be sure that it happens.

I have a friend that is a relator in Dallas. He tells me that every house he has been involved with has had at least one fogged up double pane window. We called some manufacturers and found out that residential window seals don't seem to be very reliable. They rely on desicants to keep moisture control, not the seals. Windows with a 5 year warrantee have a desiccant applied to two sides of the spacer between the panes of glass. Windows with a 10 year warantee have desiccant on four sides.

I don't know anything about Pozzi, but I'd try to buy windows from a local manufacturer that doesn't use the tubes.

Now that I've donated my $.02, does anyone have a manufacturer that they are in love with? I'm getting ready to build myself a house, and I'd like to hear who's building the best windows. -Especially in the North Texas area.

(post #171435, reply #6 of 7)

*
Have to admit that these horror stories about Pozzi are new to me. I have installed Pozzi windows here on Long
Island NY for a number of customers, with only problem being some warped sash pieces, (replaced no problem).
These windows installed are at least 6yrs old. Other customer complaint is with finish on aluminum cladding,
which customer is unable to clean to his satisfaction.

That said, a weep hole to vent the seal between the windows seems like a problem waiting to happen. I think that
the old Pella solution of having a tight fitting interior storm panel is a better idea, but I don't know if they still
make their windows like that. How does Anderson solve the problem of shipping over the mountains and
maintaining window seals?

Jim Blohm

(post #171435, reply #7 of 7)

*
Has anyone had experience using Pozzi windows? We're getting mixed opinions from contractors who have used their windows. One told us that they all fogged up. A call to corporate told us that their "insulated divided lites" had problems and were discontinued Dec 99. Apparently they are now using what they call a "capillary" or "breather" hole to vent moisture; they say that "all" gas-filled windows leak after about 5 years.

(post #171435, reply #1 of 7)

*
John, I installed a housefull of Pozzi windows & doors about 8 years ago. At that time, we had a lot of problems with the company. The windows seemed fine, not much differnet than an Andersen. The doors had a three point lock system, that in theory was great, but we had about two dozen callbacks due to lock malfunctions. The doors moved 1/2" seasonally, and the lock either binded or wouldn't catch at all, depending on the season. We had to mortice and then shim the catches repeatedy. Pozzi could have cared less. I imagine that the builder I was working for then still gets calls. Enough said. Good luck,Kimball

(post #171435, reply #3 of 7)

*
Pozzi has some serious design and quality control problems.I chose them for my home and have had a very unsatisfactory experience.The weather stripping on the sliding doors allows water to come right behind the panels and into the house. The distributor( W.F.Mold in MD) was unable to solve the problem after three site visits. We were then told that the problem was improper instalation and that they were not responsible. Numerous calls to Pozzi were unfruitfull and we finally got through to Jeld-Wen and threatened to take them to court if something wasn't done.They flew out a regional repairman who spent several days with the doors and left admitting that there was an inherent design flaw and that short of redesigning the things he couldn't fix them. Shortly thereafter the boot glazing on our Pozzi casements began to leak water-ugly grey stains on the sash and a nasty sinking feeling. 15k for glass, not yet a year old, and water is coming through. Jeld-Wen flew out their guy again who took each sash apart and siliconed the corners. It didn't work, they sent him out a third time, and he ran a bead of silicon caulk along the plastic boot and the glass. Has so far kept out the water but I'm hoping the caulk dosen't catch dust and turn black, which will not look pretty.
Needless to say, I would buy vinyl windows off the shelf at Home Depot before I would use Pozzi products again. If anyone is having problems with these products don't waste your time with Pozzi- call Bud Batey at Jeld-Wen (email if you want his number).
Well, anyway, I'm almost over it............jn

(post #171435, reply #4 of 7)

*
Gee I didn't realize Pozzi was so bad. Been using them for years, including my own house, and have never had a problem. Price is right and they do the job.