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Priming T-111 Siding

William_Tharp's picture

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Hello Folks,

I want to reside my house sometime this summer with T-111 siding. Is it worthwhile to prime the back of the siding before installation? I will be priming the edges but don't know if there is any advantage to priming the back side at all...

Thanks for any help you can provide...
Bill...

(post #159995, reply #1 of 15)

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You should always prime both and all sides of any exterior product. By the way what are you siding over.

(post #159995, reply #2 of 15)

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T-1-11 is Exterior Rated and doesn't need any priming or preservation coatings to maintain its' life. This is different than something like CDX that just has exterior glue. That is one of the reasons T-1-11 is so popular, it can be installed with no covering at all and might look grubby but it will be in good shape 25-30 years, or more, later.

So, you are putting paint on for its' looks, not to protect the T-1-11. That means if it doesn't show you don't paint it, unless you just want the exercise and want to increase paint sales.

.

(post #159995, reply #3 of 15)

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you should always prime all sides of an exterior product.. even T-1-11..

if you don't want to paint it at all... don't..

but , if you are going to paint it.. prime all the edges.. and lap the paint for at least 4 - 6 inches on the back... this will give yo a cappilary break and save the finish paint from peeling..

(post #159995, reply #4 of 15)

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Where can I get some of that glorious t-111 that you are talking about Fred?

Around here the stuff won't last 25 to 30 years on the shelf in the lumber yard. I have seen it start to decay in as little as 5 years.

I think the stuff is ugly and uneconomical but if you insist on using it, priming all SIX sides and your cut edges will prolong the life of any exterior wood product.

(post #159995, reply #5 of 15)

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Mike: Yeah, I suppose if someone lives in a moist climate there would be a possibility paint life could be ruined by capillary action. But, most folks I know use stain so that is for sure not an issue there. I've seen a lot of T-1-11 put up and can't remember anyone ever doing that.

Tommy B: Your biases are showing through and,as the lawyers say, are clouding your rendition of the facts. There are thousands, if not millions, of homes in North America with T-1-11 on them. Many, especially in Canada and Alaska have yet to see the first hint of paint or stain. It is rare to see this stuff fail in the life of the house.

If you are seeing the stuff delaminate, etc in the lumberyard then don't buy it. Obviously it is a defective batch. Sometimes you see something that looks like T-1-11 but when you look it isn't stamped "Exterior" and all the rest. That means it failed its' inspection and isn't being sold as first quality goods.

(post #159995, reply #6 of 15)

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i It is rare to see this stuff fail in the life of the house.

I don't know about my bias but in the midwest T-1-11 installed with no protection fails almost everytime. And 95% that is only face painted fails.We had one sub division that had in the covenant that the only siding allowed was T-1-11. It was known as plywood acres. They had to change the covenant because of the failure rate. And it happened within a year of being installed.

Maybe you're talking about cedar T-1-11 instead of the fir?

Prime all 6 sides...it's cheap insurance.

Barry

(post #159995, reply #7 of 15)

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I have to admit that I try to avoid using T1-11 like the plague. In my neck of the woods, it doesn't really matter what you do to it. It still fails, buckels, cracks ... whatever.

Just my opinion but have you considered vinyl siding?

(post #159995, reply #8 of 15)

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Barry & David: Are you sure you guys are using T-1-11 and not some look alike product? Or, maybe you are shopping for material that has failed inspection? The T-1-11 that is customarily used throughout North America is pretty durable stuff that withstands Alabama as well as it does Yukon.

But, William, when you go to your lumber yard don't take anything we've discussed as gospel. Read the stamp on the stuff you are going to buy. Ask for and read the manufacturer's data sheet on the product. Your lumber yard should have the sheets. If not, look at who makes the stuff and contact them. That will make sure you get the right info and that everyone is talking about the same product.

(post #159995, reply #9 of 15)

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My home has T1- 11 it was stained on 1 side after installation. It has been 5 yrs, still looks ok but the neighbors house is 10 yrs old, looks like hell. It may be exterior rated but you must stain or paint it. The glue in t1-11 is what is rated for exterior use, the wood itself has limited protection, without protection it would rot like hell . (See Neighbor). Dont get me wrong, I have not installed t1-11 on a project yet, coated on all sides. Not that I will use it on my new home ,that I will build! But if I did, I would coat all the sides. I also recommend it to all my customers but no one wants the extra charge.

(post #159995, reply #10 of 15)

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Don't get me wrong, I think all exterior wood should be stained or painted, for appearance if nothing else. My comments about using it unpainted/stained had to do with its' exterior rating, not whether it looked good. Frankly, I think unstained T-1-11 looks terrible. But that is different than structural failure.

By the way there is a difference between Exterior Rated Sheeting(T-1-11) and Exterior Glue Plywood(CDX/ACX,etc). The best way to learn about it is to read the manufacturer's sheets on the products. It will clear things up for you a lot better than exchanging posts here.

(post #159995, reply #11 of 15)

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Fred,

Don't make me resort to posting pictures of the stuff.

I agree that t-111 is everywhere, but it is not, nor will any plywood siding ever be a lifetime product.

You could glue it with epoxy and it would still fail.

Any laminated wood veneer product will benefit from having a finish on all sides. Exterior glue is not enough.

We don't look for seconds, but I agree that bad batches of plywood surface from time to time. I can't speak for canada and alaska, but for the lower 48, you couldn't be more wrong.

(post #159995, reply #12 of 15)

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Exterior rated T1-11 siding here does not last long at all, painted, stained, or left plain. There are several varieties (3/8" with 4" centers, 5/8" with 4" or 8" centers, and 3/4" with 8" or 12" centers) and ALL varieties have failed miserably in our hot, humid climate. Mainly, I believe they failed because the panels were not properly installed. Z flashing, sealing the seams and overlaps, sealing around windows and doors, etc... is essential for any wood product if you want to keep water penetration from becoming a major issue. I just see so many sloppy, incorrect procedures when this product is applied.

But, even with the incorrect application problem, this stuff won't last if not protected with stain or paint.

I have seen some very nice structures using the stuff as siding, and it looked very good. Here, it is NOT a cheap alternative to other siding. It is actually quite expensive. A 5/8" sheet, with 4" centers runs about $28 a sheet.

James

(post #159995, reply #13 of 15)

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"By the way there is a difference between Exterior Rated Sheeting(T-1-11) and Exterior Glue Plywood(CDX/ACX,etc). The best way to learn about it is to read the manufacturer's sheets on the products. It will clear things up for you a lot better than exchanging posts here." If anyone out there believes everything the manufactor's tell you, you will lose your shirt within a year in this business. The proof is in the pudding, see neighbor. I never once said that CDX and t1-11 are the same, I don't think anyone in this post has yet. My statement said , the wood used on the face of t1-11 has limited protection no mention of CDX in my posts.

(post #159995, reply #14 of 15)

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"By the way there is a difference between Exterior Rated Sheeting(T-1-11) and Exterior Glue Plywood(CDX/ACX,etc). The best way to learn about it is to read the manufacturer's sheets on the products. It will clear things up for you a lot better than exchanging posts here." If anyone out there believes everything the manufactor's tell you, you will lose your shirt within a year in this business. The proof is in the pudding, see neighbor. I never once said that CDX and t1-11 are the same, I don't think anyone in this post has yet. My statement said , the wood used on the face of t1-11 has limited protection no mention of CDX in my posts.

(post #159995, reply #15 of 15)

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Hello Folks,

I want to reside my house sometime this summer with T-111 siding. Is it worthwhile to prime the back of the siding before installation? I will be priming the edges but don't know if there is any advantage to priming the back side at all...

Thanks for any help you can provide...
Bill...