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In-swing windows anyone?

jim_eaton's picture

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okay guys -- i just returned from germany where i spent 10 days painting my father inlaws tilt/turn window. The engineering on those windows is the best. The windows are actually 2 separate panes held together by a twist pin. a key seperates the windows. There is a 1 to 1.25 inch space between the windows where a window blind is mounted. Curtains can also be used. A control string to operate the blind comes out of a small hole at the top of the window frame. Because the blind is between the 2 windows it stays cleaner, longer. The windows are mounted on a peg type hinge so that they simply lift off the hinge for removal. The windows also seal tight when you close them because of their 3 tier design. Marvin Windows make a tilt/turn window - not sure of the price though. You can call them at 800-346-5128 or in canada 800-263-6161. Yeah, the german windows don't have screens but since the window operates into the house why not make screens and mount them on the outside frame?

Jim

(post #176436, reply #10 of 25)

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A post script from Jim -- the draw back to those german tilt/turns? Try painting them. every one window is actually TWO, inside and out. makes for alot of paint and a lot of german beer.

jim

(post #176436, reply #16 of 25)

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Gabe

Only mentioned Marvin cause I had their catalog in front of me -- getting ready to remodel the kitchen and need to install a new double hung window. Tell me about your Canadian window company. Available in the U.S.?

Jim

(post #176436, reply #18 of 25)

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Just a word about Gabe's windows ... GREAT. I have installed these windows on my house on the shore in Cape Breton and am very impressed with the design and fit. Put me on your "happy customer" list. GB

(post #176436, reply #19 of 25)

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You got to go to Germany to paint windows and drink beer...and you're COMPLAINING!!?!

Trade ya...:-)

(post #176436, reply #20 of 25)

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Just complainin' about the paintin' -- cuts into the beer drinkin' time!

(post #176436, reply #22 of 25)

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I think Kolbe & Kolbe offers a tilt and turn in their commercial line.

(post #176436, reply #24 of 25)

Hi Gabe,


I'm a general contractor building custom homes in Lake Tahoe, California, high altitude, 25 feet of snow per year, 300 days of sunshine.  I haven't been too impressed with the windows we have available around here except for one, Loewen, also from Canada.  However, I am interested in the windows you have written about, and would love some information.  Colors?

(post #176436, reply #23 of 25)

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I couldn't help but notice that "Undesigned in Minnesota", in the latest FH HOMES, features in-swing casement windows. I've been looking for someone who manufactures these for over a year, does anyone know of a company that offers them? The ones in this article look custom built, and I have been given some estimates for custom built in-swing windows that would curl your straight-edge. My best bid, but still too high, is from an Italian company, including shipping to California! My client is steadfast with the desire for in-swing, as many older European homes have them and he is quite fond of the style. Further, whenever I ask a window rep. for an in-swing window they say it would leak, so then I ask for an out-swing ext. door and they give me the same answer. Why America is so fixated on out-swing casements?

(post #176436, reply #1 of 25)

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Teo,

The only inswing windows I've ever worked with are "Tischler's",and I think the spelling is correct. They come in mahogany, oak, cherry etc. and are made in Germany. They also tilt in at the top, in case you want to walk down your hallway while the window is open.

The last I heard the lead time was about 10 months, and you had better own your own bank if your house has more than one window in it.

Second question:: I think most Americans probably have so much junk in their homes already that they don't want to clutter it up more with a bunch of window sashes.

Personally, I wouldn't waste any more time on it if I were you. For instance, I tell possible clients that I don't do raised panelling on curved stairwells. I know they won't do it anyway when they hear the price. Why waste time and money for nothing? Even carpenters have bills enough to pay.

Good luck,

Clampman

(post #176436, reply #2 of 25)

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Marvin offers a "tilt-turn" also -- the style of inswing window I remember in Germany.

It may be practical enough for you to buy the sash and mount them inswing yoruself.

(post #176436, reply #3 of 25)

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If you experienced the in-swinging windows in Europe, particularly Germany, you may have noticed a couple of other things, as well. The windows had no screens, as there weren't any flies. Well, a few, maybe, but German flies are so lethargic, you can pluck them out of the air. Also, Germans like to hang their bedclothes out the window for airing out. They typically don't use sheets, but duvets over down comforters. The top tilt feature was to allow ventilation during rains, which occur eight out of seven days in northern and central Europe. The craftsmanship of the windows I observed was typically German -- very solid and strong. I was in Army quarters, built in the early fifties, and the windows were still in excellent shape. Paying a bit more for this level of quality, if still available, would seem to be money well spent.

(post #176436, reply #4 of 25)

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Teo - I can build them for you. I even have some time this Summer. e mail me and we'll talk it over. - yb

(post #176436, reply #5 of 25)

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Dear teo

We distribute a full line of high quality PVC steel reienforced tilt & turn windows so you can contact me by Email. They have screens included, brick mold standard and available with all the usual options.

We ship worldwide so location is not an issue.

Gabe

(post #176436, reply #6 of 25)

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Many thanks for all your info and insights. As my "client" is also a friend and not on a rigid timeline, we will continue our search for the "perfect enough" window. The Italian ones we like are of fine quality, simple sturdy and beautiful - no gimmicks - but the shipping across an ocean and a continent is scary and, I still hope, needless. I would like to E-mail those who offered bids and/or product info but I don't know how and the help file is not. How does one have a private chat in this public place? Once again, thanks. 'Teo

(post #176436, reply #7 of 25)

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We have been impressed by the "german" windows. I
think I saw an ad in the current FH for them.
My wife thinks we need them on our new house. I
buy German cars and the windows have the same feel, not a GM wobbly feel. I have wondered about (a) curtains or blinds as the window tip in or swing in, and (b) screens, Europe doesn't have bugs!

They are a very fine window. German house building is also unique to me. A German wouldn't
think of building a stick frame house except maybe for the cows. They all set up stationary cranes and build 100% masonary with marble stair treads and real stucco exterior and tile roofs. I don't know how their costs compare, but they consistently build a very quality house that has a good mechanical feel.

Bob

(post #176436, reply #8 of 25)

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They do have bugs! And their windows/no screens make no more sense than their toilets (with the 4 sq. in. target). Blinds would not be very compatible with a tilt-turn -- it's more the kind of thing I'd expect in a sunroom. I gotta say I'm still a double-hung fan, the best all-around window.

A French engineer at heart, ad

(post #176436, reply #9 of 25)

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okay guys -- i just returned from germany where i spent 10 days painting my father inlaws tilt/turn window. The engineering on those windows is the best. The windows are actually 2 separate panes held together by a twist pin. a key seperates the windows. There is a 1 to 1.25 inch space between the windows where a window blind is mounted. Curtains can also be used. A control string to operate the blind comes out of a small hole at the top of the window frame. Because the blind is between the 2 windows it stays cleaner, longer. The windows are mounted on a peg type hinge so that they simply lift off the hinge for removal. The windows also seal tight when you close them because of their 3 tier design. Marvin Windows make a tilt/turn window - not sure of the price though. You can call them at 800-346-5128 or in canada 800-263-6161. Yeah, the german windows don't have screens but since the window operates into the house why not make screens and mount them on the outside frame?

Jim

(post #176436, reply #11 of 25)

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teo,

If you click on the posters name, you will go to their e-mail address.

Rich Beckman

(post #176436, reply #12 of 25)

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Well, it's occuring to me that I left out an important piece of information, and that is I'm looking for inswing CASEMENT windows. Yeah,they create problems with the curtains and other interior layouts, but they served the Old World quite well for a couple of centuries and this is the look we are going for. As far as I can tell, their main function is to allow access to the shutters on upper stories as well as flower pots, laundry lines and make for quicker escapes from illicit trysts. On the first floor, those narrow alleys don't have the space for out-swinging windows hanging out. Double-hung was maybe too expensive to build with masonary homes for so long that casement became the standard. As for bugs, I don't recall a whole lot from my time in Germany, but, y'know, I don't remember ever being bothered by a bug in any biergarten!

(post #176436, reply #13 of 25)

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Hi Jim

Your post was interesting but I should point out that the tilt and turn windows produced here in Canada DO have screens and CAN have blinds attached to them. The screens are snapped in from the inside with the window open. The blinds are attached to the inside of the window molding so they move with the sash as opposed to being fixed to the frame.

These windows will outperform any Marvin window and are of higher quality.

Hope this helps,

Gabe

(post #176436, reply #14 of 25)

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...inswing windows would be a whole lot easier to clean too. - yb

and, ah, teo, about that "memory loss"...

(post #176436, reply #15 of 25)

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Poor teo, a simple question leads to infinite digressions...

You could just buy casement sash and add your own hardware. No harder than hanging a door.

(post #176436, reply #17 of 25)

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Hi Jim

We do ship windows and cork flooring to the US.

The windows are commercial grade PVC with steel framing in both the sash and the frame. They are similar to the Rehau window except they are of higher quality and less expensive. The standard window is available in fixed, single or double, standard tilt and turn configuration with screens.

Given the value of the Canadian Dollar to the US dollar, they are a better bargain than before.

If you e-mail me, I will quote your window requirements and will be able to send you more info.

(post #176436, reply #21 of 25)

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Hey teo, a few years ago i worked on a job that
had these windows that tilted in like an awning,
and also were hinged on one side. They were made
of mahogony. I know they were custom made in
Brooklyn, NY, but I can't remember the company's
name. I wasn't impressed with the product- most
leaked, and you couldn't get much of a breeze.
Sorry I don't have more.

inswing casement windows (post #176436, reply #25 of 25)

I have a project coming up where I need 30  3.0 by 4.0 (RO) inswing french style casement. Any new suppliers out there?