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Trimber truss connectors - Split ring

Tim_Duvall's picture

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I am a owner builder and my architech has specified 2.5" split ring connectors for eight trusses on my project. I have been unable to locate a supplier for these. Does any one know a source? Is there an alternative?

(post #169388, reply #7 of 12)

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Spike grids
b are not a substitute for split ring connectors.
Split ring connectors have not "gone out of fashion" insofar as I know...they have a specific purpose which is to transfer shear acroos a truss connection. They are used when a simple bolt connection is inadequate to transfer the shear forces in the connection. Shear plates are another alternative. The last I used them, Teco mfr'd them..and maybe they have gone out of business. I'd contact a truss mfr. of large trusses, such as bow string trusses..they could give you a line on where you can find them and get the installation cutter.

Split rings are an engineered product, and as such, it is not recommended to substitute iron pipe unless it is engineered.

(post #169388, reply #9 of 12)

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Ryan: You are incorrect that the connector need only be as strong as the wood it is connecting. Schedule 40 pipe may be as strong as, perhaps stronger than the section used for the split ring connector. My point is that split ring connectors are
b engineered
and unless you care to
b engineer
(i.e. re-invent the wheel) the connection based on the actual forces and published allowable stresses for Sch 40 pipe, you shouldn't mess with it.

(post #169388, reply #10 of 12)

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I am a owner builder and my architech has specified 2.5" split ring connectors for eight trusses on my project. I have been unable to locate a supplier for these. Does any one know a source? Is there an alternative?

(post #169388, reply #1 of 12)

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The last time we used Split -rings was in 1974, on an octagon house with 4x12 trusses. The split ring joints were made by Teco, and their address then was :
5530 Wisconsin Ave, Washington, D.C. 20015 tel: then was (301)654-8288. We also had to buy a special bit for a 1/2" drill to cut the circular grooves that the split ring fits into . the thru-bolt compresses the split -ring into the precision cut grooves to transfer the forces from one member to the other in the timber truss. nice product, and a real confidence builder !
I imagine that if you do a web search for Teco , you may find them or whomever bought them. I'd be interested to see what you find.
Good Luck

(post #169388, reply #2 of 12)

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I believe cleveland still makes a split ring tool. Last time I checked, it was about $400 for the tool, though. If you don't have a number for for Cleveland, call me tomorrow at work: (217) 965-4911 7am to 4pm CST

(post #169388, reply #3 of 12)

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Interesting how something off-beat like this comes up once, then several times just after, no?

(post #169388, reply #4 of 12)

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Yeah, I was just thinking that same thing. I'd bet it is all a matter of coincidence and perception, but sometimes....

Rich Beckman

(post #169388, reply #5 of 12)

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I helped (supervised, built, provided materials, provided tools, applied for permits, made the drawings, etc.) for a pole barn my father-in-law wanted. I decided to use these connectors instead of just relying on bolts.

I used 2" iron pipe cut into 1-1/2 inch lengths. I made the circular groves with a pivot pin on a plywood router base.

I don't know if your architect will allow home made rings but they are sure as strong as the ones commercially made. (I didn't even know they made these anymore.)

(post #169388, reply #6 of 12)

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Tim,

Rather than using split rings for which you'll need to first find them and buy or borrow a cutter, try Spike Grids. Architect can spec size you'll need and there's no drilling. Most major metal connector manufacturing companies make them.

Last time we used split rings was 1968. I think they've gone out of fashion.

(post #169388, reply #8 of 12)

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I would normally agree that you should not substitute home-made for engineered connectors. However, in this case, the connector only needs to be as strong as the wood it is connecting and an adequately sized piece of pipe would do the trick. A short piece of pipe manufactured for this purpose is not much differend than a short piece of pipe cut at home for this purpose. In fact I doubt that the commercially available split rings are as heavy as standard schedule 40 pipe.

I am not a PE but I do have a BSME so this is my semi-professional opinion :)

4 inch TECO split-ring cutter (post #169388, reply #11 of 12)

I live in NW Montana and used to do a lot of heavy timber construction. I know you want a 2.5 inch but if your framing material is at least 5.5 inches wide this 4 inch model should work even better. Have an engineer? I bought this used about 20 years ago for alsmost $400 and I had it sharpened professionally and set the cutter depths myself....it works great! I have just a very few rings but I think TECO still sells those......Dan Grinde at (406)471-0344 or email to pinetreenine3 at yahoo dot com. Thanks

4 inch TECO split-ring cutter (post #169388, reply #12 of 12)

I live in NW Montana and used to do a lot of heavy timber construction. I know you want a 2.5 inch but if your framing material is at least 5.5 inches wide this 4 inch model should work even better. Have an engineer? I bought this used about 20 years ago for alsmost $400 and I had it sharpened professionally and set the cutter depths myself....it works great! I have just a very few rings but I think TECO still sells those......Dan Grinde at (406)471-0344 or email to pinetreenine3 at yahoo dot com. Thanks