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Building Gone Bad

Jeeptj12's picture

Building Gone Bad (post #207928)

So my house was supposed to be finished in April then May then June and now August.  A little scope: It took them a month to just break ground.  My contractor (large developer builder and owner is friend) installed all the wrong windows (took 6 weeks to get new ones in).  They've installed the wrong doors (front main and french doors) three times.  They completely butched the zip wall sheathing which took them 2 months to get right.  They only put one nail top and bottom of every stud.  The list can go on and on.  They just had a terrible framer and poor organization and communication.   This has put us way off schedule and are now rushing to finish.

 

Now, I've asked for 4 recessed lights to be added in the kitchen for awhile.  Drywall is supposed to start Thursday.  Their communication with me is very limited with no returned phone calls and no to little response to emails.  At this point I want to install the recessed lights myself.  I've done a ton of electrical work (wired a few homes) in my life.  This should be a simple task for me.  I'm just worried my contractor may say something or there may be recourse for my actions.  My contract with them expired last month when they were supposed to deliver the house.  I've contacted a lawyer and he has said I'm pretty much stuck as the courts are known for siding with the contractor most of the time.  I was also thinking about running the wire and leaving it in a plated box only to come back after everything is done and install the lights.  Any opinions?

Opinions?  Yes, but you don't (post #207928, reply #1 of 13)

Opinions?  Yes, but you don't want to hear them.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Nah, I'm an easy going guy.  (post #207928, reply #2 of 13)

Nah, I'm an easy going guy.  I've heard fire the contractor (I would but home building is booming in my area so I'm screwed because I've made calls).  I've heard you're stuck.  I've heard sell the house once it's done because it's crap.  Etc.  So hit me with them.

jeep (post #207928, reply #3 of 13)

Run the switch wire to the location and make note of this location so you can use remodel cans there later. Run loops from each to each, can.

Give it a supply at the switch location,  pulled back to a known accessible junction box, so you can hook it up later.

Decide now if you want to switch from a couple different locations or if you need the switch(s) in an already (now too small) installed box.

Shoot the first [JOBSITE WORD] that touches, changes or eliminates what you've done.

Don't forget-run the wire correctly (you wouldn't want a problem later).

 

WATCH the drywallers-hope they're the best and why oh why can't people find the right folks to work with?............................

Best of luck.

 

by the way-where's your location?  be nice to know where there's such a building boon that any smuch can call themselves a builder?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


I'm in Southern Delaware near (post #207928, reply #4 of 13)

I'm in Southern Delaware near the beach.  My builders business is up 100% and developments are popping up like they were before the recession.  I think part of the problem is my builder laid people off and now is busy and short staffed.  He doesn't want to hire because he isn't sure this housing boom is going to last.  Also, he is trying to stuff as many houses in at once so he can sell them while things are hot.  My house is left on the back burner because he already is getting paid and under contract.  His development homes are his first priority to get done and sold.

jeep (post #207928, reply #5 of 13)

I don't know how you got hooked up with this guy, but anyone that runs a business like that is bound for failure.

Don't hire because you're busy?  Afraid? 

He should quit now while your ahead.

 

But best of luck with this, in spite of himself.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


He's ahead?? (post #207928, reply #6 of 13)

He's ahead??


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I was trying to fire him and (post #207928, reply #7 of 13)

I was trying to fire him and I called around to other contractors but they are backed up two months now with everything taking off.  So I'm kind of screwed.  I am going to call the BBB and attorney general once this headache is over.  I've been in contact with a consumer lawyer who said the courts side with the contractor more times then none.  My best bet is trying to settle everything out of court.  I don't expect his business to last.  He has been lucky as most of his homes are done and people buy them for vacation homes.  I think I am probably his first customer that has been constantly on site with home building knowledge or at least checks everything.  Our county is very small and things spread very quickly.  Once you get a bad review it's hard to find business anymore.

jeep (post #207928, reply #8 of 13)

from my experience (and never have been sued or taken to small claims or any other "claim" made against my operation)..........

testifying in a half dozen court cases or mediation,  both for the homowner or contractor and having been deposed a few times for litigation............

the end results in almost all-even split-50/50.  

 

That court axiom about dividing the baby rings constant.

 

Truly sorry for your situation, but would consult with another attorney-one that you can trust.  Perhaps half is better than you think,

or not.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Asbestos Management (post #207928, reply #10 of 13)

While I have worked around asbestos in several forms, I or the company I had worked for took precautions but no where near the requirements to asbestos mgmt.

 

Post makes no sense........because I tried to insert a worthless spam link

No one mentioned asbestos, (post #207928, reply #11 of 13)

No one mentioned asbestos, and if you knew anything about it you'd know that, except in very rare situations, asbestos isn't used in new construction.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I have a hard time believing (post #207928, reply #9 of 13)

I have a hard time believing there is only one nail in each end of the stud - that would never pass the framing inspection anywhere.   If you are saying they used two nails in the end of each stud that's normal framing - nothing wrong with that.

If the electrical sub likes you he won't turn you in to the building department if you are adding to the work that's already passed the rough inspection.  What are the chances he'll let it slide and hope the inspector doesn't catch it and penalize HIM - essentially you are violating the building code by not having it inspected before the sheetrock is going up.  In case it's not clear - what you are suggesting by skirting the builder is a terrible idea.

Something about this entire story sounds fishy - if you have gone so far as to hire an attorny why hasn't he simply sent a letter to the builder informing them of your intentions to sue for various things if they aren't fixed pronto.  Normally this gets their attention and gets things moving. 

I'm just guessing, but my gut tells me there is more to this story that we aren't hearing - and a good probability that it's not all a function of the builder.  When a builder and your own lawyer are telling you to sit back and relax, I'm guessing you're a problem client.

If I could edit my location it would say I'm now in Reno :-)

install the cans (post #207928, reply #12 of 13)

Go ahead and install the can lights where you want them. Rough wire them together and leave a small loop of wire where it enters each j-box as well as a few inches of wire folded over on itself inside of the j-boxes.

The drywallers are not going to consult building plans to see what's supposed to be where. They're going to rock and roll over everything. Heck, the way your project is going, I'd take photos of each wall and ceiling now, then do an exposed J-box count after the house is rocked to make sure that the drywallers didn't leave any buried treasure.


There are 10 kinds of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who do not.


Yep, take pictures of (post #207928, reply #13 of 13)

Yep, take pictures of everything.  A good idea even when a project is going well.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville