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Career change

Mart77's picture

Career change (post #206761)

I'm looking for advice from someone who has been through a career change from an office job to running a contruction company.  Please feel free to say it like it is and don't sugar coat it.

I built or rather managed and did parts of the work in the construction of my custom home a year ago and found the experience very fullfilling.  Being able to admire the end product was something I had never been able to do in my 10 yrs as an IT Project Manager.

So I started thinking this might be something I would want to do for a living.  Being 35 I think I still have time for a career change...

Starting capital is not an issue at this point.  Long hours have never scared me.  I'm just wondering if anyone has been down this road and regretted it?  Or rather think it's the best decision they ever made?

 

Thanks!

How's your marriage? (post #206761, reply #1 of 9)

How's your marriage?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Mariage (post #206761, reply #2 of 9)

DanH wrote:

How's your marriage?

 

Not sure if this was rethorical.  lol  

 

But she's fine with anything I do.  She's used to my 60-80 hour weeks.  

60-80... (post #206761, reply #3 of 9)

How does she like 60-80hr weeks with barely any pay/profit to you?  :)  

 

Don't quit your day job.   

It takes a long time to build up a reputation and then fill the calender and then to keep full/booked for the next few months. Problem with being a one man show is that not only are you the worker, you're the salesman.  Hard to do both at the same time. Being a GC, your more of a salesman and problem solver as well as money manager and not much as much of the hands-on stuff.  .  

Have you looked into your state's licensing regs for General Contractor?  

reply to John (post #206761, reply #5 of 9)

I'm actually in Canada and in my province all you need to register as a GC is $100/yr and proof of liability insurance.  In terms of qualification I got my certification in our provincial building code in order to qualify as a member of our mandatory new home warranty program for builders.

The market here is quite healthy and I'm planning more on building spec homes and developping a few percels of land that I own rather than pre-selling for the next few years.  My background is in project management so I'm hoping those skills would translate well.

I've done most of my laws and regulations research and education over the last while prior to building my own house.  

I might just need reassurance from someone who has gone trhough this more than anything.  Worse case is my expiriment is a failure and I'm back behind a desk...

 

john7g wrote:

How does she like 60-80hr weeks with barely any pay/profit to you?  :)  

 

Don't quit your day job.   

It takes a long time to build up a reputation and then fill the calender and then to keep full/booked for the next few months. Problem with being a one man show is that not only are you the worker, you're the salesman.  Hard to do both at the same time. Being a GC, your more of a salesman and problem solver as well as money manager and not much as much of the hands-on stuff.  .  

Have you looked into your state's licensing regs for General Contractor?  

Hey John7g, Your advice is (post #206761, reply #7 of 9)

Hey John7g, Your advice is really good. Dont quit your current jb and directly jump into business. Build your base side by side. Do you have any background in the this industry. Take help from people already having a base here. It is always tough to make a name in construction especially with so many giants ruling the market. Think about all pros and cons. See if you back up and only then get  into it.

The point is that you'll be (post #206761, reply #4 of 9)

The point is that you'll be working your a** off, not bringing in any money, and in debt up to your eyebrows.  At some point you're likely to go even crazier than you are now.  Can your marriage withstand that?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

to Dan (post #206761, reply #6 of 9)

If it can't withstand that, I'd rather she leave me when I'm poor and in debt to my eyebrows than before or after.  ;)

 

 

DanH wrote:

The point is that you'll be working your a** off, not bringing in any money, and in debt up to your eyebrows.  At some point you're likely to go even crazier than you are now.  Can your marriage withstand that?

    I think that you (post #206761, reply #8 of 9)

 

 
I think that you should not change your profession right now and take a good look at the profession. Even if you want to join that field then first go for a certain time when you work there without leving your present job so that you can come back in case you do not like it.

go for it (post #206761, reply #9 of 9)

Getting into construction is the best move I ever made. I can't imagine doing anything else. If you feel that way about it, have at it. Things have a way of working themselves out.