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8 foot 2x4s have 1/4” extra?

za105's picture

I’m framing an 8x6 floor for a shed and the 2x4x8’s are in fact 1/4 of an inch longer than 8 feet. I know the nominal measurements and have accounted for that, I was just surprised by the extra 1/4” on the end of both boards and feel confident that the excess will mess things up down the line. To trim, or not to trim? That is the question.

 

And is this normal for board lengths to not be their actual lengths?

News flash!  Wood is (post #216528, reply #1 of 11)

News flash!  Wood is humidity sensitive, and, in particular, it tends to shrink over time as it dries up.  Sawmills likely cut things a hair on the long side so the won't come up short after shipping and storage.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Absolutely. (post #216528, reply #2 of 11)

Only framing lumber  you usually find cut exact to a length is studs. P.E.T. means precision trimmed studs. Other dimensional lumber is typically over cut 1/4" or more. 

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I would trim to the exact (post #216528, reply #3 of 11)

I would trim to the exact length.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Oldhand and florida, thank (post #216528, reply #4 of 11)

Oldhand and florida, thank you so much. That reassures me.

brace for history lesson (post #216528, reply #7 of 11)

When I began in carpentry back in the '70's 2x8 and up would vary in length from 1/4" to 5/8" long within a package. Also many or

most of the ends were very unsquare. 2x4's had squared ends and 2x6 could go either way. We believed that any board [except

precut studs] had to be 1/4" longer  than it was specd at so you could get 2 pieces half it's stated length out of it. Otherwise it

wouldn't make grade. Probably a wives tale, anyway hardly relevant as how often do you need to cut pieces exactly 1/2 of an even

length? Excepting common wall studs about all the lumber in a house is an odd measurement.

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4 footers. (post #216528, reply #5 of 11)

Suppose you needed 4' 2x4s. You'd be kind of POed if you had to buy 10' to get 2 of them plus a saw kerf.

That's what wedges are for! (post #216528, reply #6 of 11)

That's what wedges are for!


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I remember thinking that but... (post #216528, reply #8 of 11)

What if you needed 48 1/4''  2x4's? Every bit as likely as needing an even figure.

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But..... (post #216528, reply #9 of 11)

you wouldn't feel as ripped off.

but.... (post #216528, reply #10 of 11)

you wouldn't feel as ripped off. Ever notice that hardwood plywood is 49 x 97

Yep (post #216528, reply #11 of 11)

mgmahan wrote:

you wouldn't feel as ripped off. Ever notice that hardwood plywood is 49 x 97

you sure do when you load on edge into your van.....

 

 

Here's another oddity from the past.

In the 70's I worked for young framer who corrected me while I was crowning joists.  This was when Weyerhaeuser had labeling printed on one edge of their framing lumber.  He told me to cease fire on the crowning.......the label goes up.....pre-crowned.

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