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Alternative to Laminate stair nosing

tinkv192's picture

Hey all, I recently laminated my bottom floor with a nice deep wood laminate. I want to do the same on the stairwell which seems relatively easy except for the cost of laminate nosing which is extremely expensive. I  currently do have nosing on the stairwell and the steps are not in the greatest condition. I was going to go over them with 1/2 plywood to give the laminate a nice surface and while cutting off the overhang nosing. Does anyone have an idea what I could use as an alternative nosing?

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It seems to me that solid (post #214586, reply #1 of 16)

It seems to me that solid wood nosing would be the obvious choice, assuming you don't want to use metal nosing.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Too thick (post #214586, reply #2 of 16)

If I use hardwood nosing the thickness would be off for the laminate 

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Tink (post #214586, reply #3 of 16)

if you can't find it to fit, weigh the price of what will work at the store against making your own nosing.  Time is money, maybe the fun of the project will soften the bite.

Or

replace the crappy treads with something good to go over that its size fits the nosing you can get.

 

Personally, to me laminate stairs are dangerously slick.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Other ideas (post #214586, reply #5 of 16)

I guess I didn't word what I'm trying to do correctly. I want to cut off the existing nosing off the treads, go over the old treads and box them in with plywood and have a 90 degree angle without rounded nosing. I'm thinking I will need a thicker pices of riser to add on for the missing inch or so I will lose on the run. But after I box in the stairs with laminate I will need something in place of the rounded nosing for aesthetic reasons. Hope this makes more sense.

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Maybe I didn't make my self (post #214586, reply #6 of 16)

Maybe I didn't make my self clear:  Get some wood that matches the laminate.  Shape your new nosings out of it.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Tink (post #214586, reply #7 of 16)

Can you post a picture of what you have now?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Calvin, here is a pic. I (post #214586, reply #8 of 16)

Calvin,

here is a pic. I want to rem be the nosing that overhangs and square it up and not have the rounded nosing look after I install the laminate. But Need something to give it a finished look. When I cut off the nosing I will lose an inch on the run so will have to attach new risers to make up the distance

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How is installing new risers, (post #214586, reply #9 of 16)

How is installing new risers, after you cut off the nosing, going to "make up the distance"?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

After I cut off the old (post #214586, reply #10 of 16)

After I cut off the old nosing which is 3/4" , I would install a riser that is 3/4" thick. Then cover the run with plywood.

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After I cut off the old (post #214586, reply #11 of 16)

After I cut off the old nosing which is 3/4" , I would install a riser that is 3/4" thick. Then cover the run with plywood.

Then you're right back where you started, only without a nosing. Why do you need the doubled riser?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Sorry..lol (post #214586, reply #12 of 16)

Sorry I misspoke. I am going to cut the current nosing off which I did today, and what I did was basically cover the stairs with 1/2 plywood to make a good contact with the material I am going to use. The rise is 7" and the run I want to be around 10 to 10-1/2.  I need to find a nosing substitute as the products out there are extremely expensive. I think my only option is to make my own treads.

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Sorry..lol (post #214586, reply #13 of 16)

Sorry I misspoke. I am going to cut the current nosing off which I did today, and what I did was basically cover the stairs with 1/2 plywood to make a good contact with the material I am going to use. The rise is 7" and the run I want to be around 10 to 10-1/2.  I need to find a nosing substitute as the products out there are extremely expensive. I think my only option is to make my own treads.

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You attach the nosing to the (post #214586, reply #4 of 16)

You attach the nosing to the front of the tread and butt the laminate up to it.  Or you can machine an inset in the nosing so that the laminate can lap over it a bit.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Hi Tink,        I can't (post #214586, reply #14 of 16)

Hi Tink,

       I can't imagine that by the time you are done with your plan that you will have saved any time or money over removing and replacing the treads.  I read this whole thread and something else to consider is how the stair rise is affected by adding laminate over exisiting flooring, if that is what you are doing.  If you are adding laminate at both the top and bottom floors then you need to add on top of the existing risers the thickness of the new laminate flooring.  Your plan will keep the rise consistent, although I would still remove the treads and risers and replace them, making adjustments to the heights as needed.  Also, attachment is an issue.  You can't/shouldn't be gluing and nailing laminate down.  It typically floats and is held down by gravity and furniture etc.  Maybe your specific product is different however..  Lastly, stairs take a beating and laminate will not stand up to the traffic and hard blows to the outside corners the way a rounded over hardwood tread will.  Just my 2 cents...   Coming from a contractor that specializes in high end interior trim and stairs..

Hi Tink,        I can't (post #214586, reply #15 of 16)

double post*

Thank you (post #214586, reply #16 of 16)

After some consideration I went with just replacing the entire steps with Oak. I want them to last so I guess it's money best spent rather than having to do it down the road at some point...Thanks for the help.

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