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Asphalt shingle step flashing size ???

royr's picture

When flashing a asphalt roof with a 5 1/2 inch reveal, what size should I make the step flashing. I was planning on making it 10 x 10 and bending it in half with 5" on the wall and 5" on the roof.


Thanks


Roy

(post #90744, reply #1 of 8)

I normally make mine from 5"x7" stock. That's the size they are available in pre-cut bundles. I bend them so 2" goes up the wall and 3" on the roof. If you are flashing against brick, 5" up the wall makes the counter flashing extremely tall. Otherwise, I see no reason not to make it so large if you want, I just dont think it's necessary.  Make sure the nail in each step is covered by the next step.

(post #90744, reply #2 of 8)

we make our step flash from colored coil stock.. so the 24" width lends itself to 8" strips. which we cut into 10" pieces.. so each step is 8x10 with 4" up & 4" out..


we bend it in our break and cut off 10" pieces in the field


Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

(post #90744, reply #3 of 8)

I cut from coil stock too and the size depends on the pitch of the roof but most of them are 8"x8" but I break them on the diagonal.

.

Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #90744, reply #4 of 8)

Why on the diagonal???


some times excellence is confusing!


:)


T


Do not try this at home!


I am a trained professional!

. .

(post #90744, reply #5 of 8)

Several reasons,

>it looks betterer

>It puts more metal lapped at the place where flashing does most of it's work, the exposure between edge of shingle and bottom of siding.

>the exposed lap edge is vertical, lining up with the drip line

>it places the metal farthest back underlying the shingle at the location where backed up water most often finds a way in - this by my experience in seeing water stain on tarpaper in tearoffs with smaller 7x7 tin step flashing.

I got the idea of doing it this way years ago from a tearoff where the step flashings were tin on a very old house. They had been broke on a diagonal 6x6 with shingles at 5" exposure. I was impressed with how well they had done the job even though the lead was almost worn through in places. You can also see something similar with chimney flashings where the bricklayer makes the step and counter flashing in one unit.

.

Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #90744, reply #6 of 8)

I don't like step flashing on valleys but it is pretty effective there too when it is necessary to step.

.

Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #90744, reply #7 of 8)

Piffin,


Do you nail in the upper corner?


I may try this next time I have to roof, just to stir things up a bit!


Do you cut your pieces to match the roof slope?


An 8x8 will  only give plumb and level edges on a 12/12


we may need a computer program figure out the sizes for all the possible roof pitches!!


This could be fun, almost makes me want to do roofing........NOT!!


Mr T


 


 


 


Do not try this at home!


I am a trained professional!

. .

(post #90744, reply #8 of 8)

On high end work where flashings will be visible, I change the break line enough to make it perfect but most times, close is good enough.

I nail in the piont of the triangle furthest away from the break at wall and roof but on roof side I set the nail so the head is just over the edge of the metal, allowing it to be popped up again twenty or thirty years from now. Thinking about you youger guys and atoning for all my past sins.

.

Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...