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Attaching pergola to house???

MBaybut's picture

Hi,

I''m planning a porch and pergola for the front of my house. Not sure on how to attach to house. Single story. Low profile deck.

All help appreciated.

The best way to attach it is (post #207075, reply #1 of 17)

The best way to attach it is not.  Have it basically free-standing, and just make "incidental" connections to the house.  Then you don't have to hassle with attaching a ledger to the house, etc.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

mb (post #207075, reply #2 of 17)

Porch roof?

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Calvin, Thanks. Not sure if (post #207075, reply #3 of 17)

Calvin,

Thanks. Not sure if your asking me a question???

yes (post #207075, reply #4 of 17)

Porch means roof to me, but you didn't specify attachment-roof or porch floor/frame?  The pergola-sort of the same question..............but I assume the top of the pergola attachment.

With the porch roof, you can overbuild up onto the existing, but I'm unsure of your plan. 

So if you would, 'splain it a bit more what you plan.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Thanks. I was thinking maybe (post #207075, reply #5 of 17)

Thanks. I was thinking maybe something like this.

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Not sure if you are attaching (post #207075, reply #6 of 17)

Not sure if you are attaching a ledger to the brick or the fascia. With such a wide roof overhang, moisture behind the ledger may not be a big problem if attaching to the wall. Just the same, it's common to use something to stand the ledger off so there isn't direct contact with the brick where bugs and micro organisms can take up residence. You can use lead shields and lag bolts for the attachment and a short  PVC pipe couplings as the spacers between the ledger and brick. Something like this.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

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Thanks. Yeah that's the way I (post #207075, reply #7 of 17)

Thanks. Yeah that's the way I was picturing it. I wasn't sure how it was going to look though with that 36" overhang. I know this probably won't work but I was kinda looking to see if I could attach it to the fascia, using that as a ledger. I think the look of that may flow better but I don't know if that would present other problems.

Mike

I don't think there's any (post #207075, reply #8 of 17)

I don't think there's any really good way to do it with those constraints -- it'll be a compromise no matter what.  Attaching to the eave is structurally a little iffy, but running all the way to the brick isn't ideal either.  Neither would be visually pleasing from the underside.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Thanks. Do you think there (post #207075, reply #9 of 17)

Thanks. Do you think there could be a way to beef the fascia up any. Even take it down and replace it with 2x??

Mike

There's no way to tell from (post #207075, reply #10 of 17)

There's no way to tell from here how the roof is constructed and whether the eave could bear the (admittedly light) load from the pergola.  If the posts were moved inboard enough to "balance" the pergola then the attachment would be less of a problem, but that would cut into your "floor space".


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Thanks. (post #207075, reply #11 of 17)

Thanks.

Mike

Attached Pergola (post #207075, reply #12 of 17)

My advise would be to contact your local building department.  Here in Riverside county CA, if you want a free standing patio, it has to be a minimum of 10 ft away from the house.  You can have two different attachments for type you showed in your picture. One is using a ledger attached to the wall, another is attached to the fascia board - this is restricted to a max of 8 ft wide and having a lattice roof.  I just finished an "attached" patio that ties into the roof deck with 2 in straps (Simpson MST 48s), the roof is 6:12 with the same tile as the house.   Here is a link to the riverside standard patio plan, hope it helps, but you need to check with your local guys.

http://www.rctlma.org/building/content/docs/171_Patio_Cover_Standard.pdf

Thanks so much for that. Very (post #207075, reply #13 of 17)

Thanks so much for that. Very useful.

Mike

You'll be spending a huge (post #207075, reply #14 of 17)

You'll be spending a huge amount of time to reinforce a facia/subfacia to handle any kind of load - just a bad idea.  

The best connection that I like is to build the pergola higher than the facia so one end rests on brackets over the wall.  The brackets screw into the trusses or rafters with 1/4" structural screws and is waterproofed similar to any roof penetration of that type.  Blocking in the atic transfers any weight to the wall.

If you like a tall pergola this is a great way to go.

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

Thanks. I think it's all (post #207075, reply #15 of 17)

Thanks. I think it's all going to be what the city will want. They're getting to be a pain about everything.

Exactly why I mention this (post #207075, reply #16 of 17)

Exactly why I mention this method - structurally it's a strong connection and building departments ok the design with no problem since the load paths and connections are quite specific and easy to clearly document.   This method was brought to my attention by an architect I used a lot and his engineer in an area that has some snow load to contend with.  

Ledgering through brick is often not a great way to go since the brick is not tight against the framing in most cases and you risk having a ledger that ends up not tight against the brick if the brick gives way - my guess is the city will be quite specific about brick penetrations and I will bet that option will involve some sort of blocking directly from ledger to framing and not sandwitching the brick.    As for something on the end of the facia - with a deep birdsmouth on a thin rafter, the cantileavered rafter tails barely support the roof overhang and themselves - if you have any snow loads you will have a hard time convincing an engineer or the city that anything that's easily done will beef them up.

The city will want it to be structurally sound, how you go about that is more or less up to you as you present it to them. 

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

Thanks.  The house is (post #207075, reply #17 of 17)

Thanks.  The house is actually block with brick facade. That thought did cross my mind about how easy the brick would seperate. The roof will be due to be redone in a few years so I may consider getting a quote on reframing the roof to give me a bigger over hang then build a porch instead.

Mike