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Bar stool countertop overhang

fossil's picture

Hello,

I'm trying to provide an area in the kitchen for a few bar stools and wondering what a typical overhang on a counter top would be?

Can it be the same level as the counter top or a different height all together?

Thanks for any help or suggestions.

(post #104921, reply #1 of 20)

Pick out the bar stools first.


 


Mike


Insert initially amusing but ultimately annoying catch phrase here.
Insert initially amusing but ultimately annoying catch phrase here.

(post #104921, reply #9 of 20)

"Pick out the bar stools first."


WRONG! Pick out the beer first, and then grab the stool closest to the tap!


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #104921, reply #12 of 20)

You may have a point. Pick out the beer first and you won't give a sh1t how things line up!


 


Mike


Insert initially amusing but ultimately annoying catch phrase here.
Insert initially amusing but ultimately annoying catch phrase here.

(post #104921, reply #2 of 20)

A fairly common overhang is 12" and you can have the bar at a different height then the counter but what do you want?


Doug

(post #104921, reply #3 of 20)

I use 14". Seems to work fine.


Forrest

(post #104921, reply #4 of 20)

A typical overhang is 12" , which allows you to get your knees under (sort of). A longer overhang would probably require the use of posts or cobels for support. You can design and build a larger overhang without supports, but it takes thought and planning. All you really need is leg space, so 12" to 16" is what I have typically done.


As to height, that is a function of the design as well as personal preference. I like bar height because I can lean on it, or use it from a standing position, but a normal design limits the overall width of the bar top. A counter height bar uses space from the deeper counter it is a part of, and becomes part of the working space of the kitchen.


As to the stools, obviously you would need different heights. For bar stools, most people, and especially children, need to climb into them, whereas the counter height stools are sat into. Bar stools are normally narrower than counter height stools.


Hope this helps.


                        

  

when you are up to yur knees in gators, make gatorade     

(post #104921, reply #8 of 20)

A friend of mine has one at table height (30").

.
.
A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #104921, reply #10 of 20)

I have seen that, albeit rarely.

                        

  

when you are up to yur knees in gators, make gatorade     

(post #104921, reply #5 of 20)

Generally, the overhang on a countertop for sitting at with a bar stool is around 12". I've seen less, I've seen more. Several things to consider:

1 - what is the max overhang the counter material can go without support (brackets)

2 - if using brackets, size the minimum overhang based on the brackets

3 - find out what type of stools you are intending to use (previously mentioned)

4 - higher than kitchen height tops are typical (42" high) but may be too much or too
little based on the size of the end user. (tall people vs. short people)

5 - space for walking around the countertop. minimum clearance in a kithcen from
edge of counter to any other edge (wall, another counter, cabinets, etc) is 36"
42" clearance is much more pleasant to manuver around when carying groceries

just food for thought,

"it aint the work I mind,
It's the feeling of falling further behind."

Bozini Latini

www.ingrainedwoodworking.com

"it aint the work I mind, It's the feeling of falling further behind." Bozini Latini www.ingrainedwoodworking.com

(post #104921, reply #6 of 20)

Anyone hazard a guess as to what weight on the edge of the counter one should design for - I can just see some athletic teenager deciding to perch on the edge of the counter. How thick a piece of plywood should one consider as the minimum for a cantilevered 12" counter without supports?

(post #104921, reply #7 of 20)

Thanks for all the replies.

I taped out 10" of overhang trying to keep the overhang minimal to allow foot traffic behind.

I might be able to do 12-14'', but no more.

I was thinking of making a narrow ledge between the countertop and the overhang for storing small items used near a stove. Wondering if bar stool overhang height should be higher than the counter top for aesthetics? (sp) I could choose the stools accordingly.

As far as what I want, I don't really know, just trying to get feeling of what is typical. The house 1st floor anyway was built in 1895 and the second in 1927. Sorta craftsman wannabe style, but currently totally gutted on the inside with fir floors throughout and 5'' cove molding on the ceiling.

Thanks for anymore advice or suggestions

(post #104921, reply #11 of 20)

My countertop overhang is about 11 inches (not home to measure excatly).  I spoke to the soapstone supplier before I built the island and he suggested 12-14 inch overhang would be OK, but obviously that depends on the countertop material.  Ours is supported on each end by a sort of pier.  We are pleased that we opted for single level.  I read somewhere that the rule of thumb is that you need a pretty wide top (48 inches?) before two levels really works.  Ours is about 38 inches wide.  People who put a cooktop in the island often opt for two levels, typically 36 and 42 inches high.  Ours works well for food prep., buffet serving and chatting with the cook.


 


(post #104921, reply #13 of 20)

NICELY DONE! I fought with the same thing on our 12" overhang Soapstone.


For support, I welded a frame, let it into the cabinets and attached it through to the front of the boxes.


Hidden and effective.


As you can see, you and my wife have similar tastes.





"Fortunately, the ideas of individual liberty, private property, freedom of contract and association, personal responsibility and liability, and government power as the primary enemy of liberty and property, will not die out as long as there is a human race, simply because they are true and the truth supports itself."


Hans-Hermann Hoppe

(post #104921, reply #15 of 20)

Nice job. The welded support looks like it would do the trick.  Are you happy with the soapstone?  We love it, but for some people it may not be dramatic enough.


 

(post #104921, reply #16 of 20)

We are VERY pleased with the soapstone. It's veining is more pronounced in person, especially after a bit of mineral oil. Everything about it seems to become more appealing as time passes.


So far, the stone is doing its job beautifully.


"Fortunately, the ideas of individual liberty, private property, freedom of contract and association, personal responsibility and liability, and government power as the primary enemy of liberty and property, will not die out as long as there is a human race, simply because they are true and the truth supports itself."


Hans-Hermann Hoppe

(post #104921, reply #17 of 20)

nice work!


That's the way to support any stone overhang.  Plywood will not do the trick-too much flex.


sully

(post #104921, reply #14 of 20)

We have a bit more room so were able to do a curved overhang.  Runs from 8" at the ends to 23" in the middle.  Similar concept to the others with a supporting framework (though mine's maple. plus a 3/4" 13-ply plywood underlayment)


Barstools can be found online for any height you need - in 1" increments.  For counter height stools the seats range from 24" to 29"; we went with 27" and that's worked well for both the adults and the grandkids.


We are very happy to have selected the all-one-height approach, works well with our lifestyle.  Pics and more discussion here:


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-breaktime/messages?msg=79699.5

(post #104921, reply #18 of 20)

There are design standards set by both the nkba and asid for the proper overhang.


The amount of overhang is a mainly a function of height of the countertop.


The higher the top, the less the overhang.  The theory being that when sitting in a taller stool, your knees bend less than when sitting in a shorter chair and therefore you need less overhang with the higher tops.  Mind you, these are recommended overhangs, personal preference usually prevails.


for 42" high tops min. of 12"; 36" high tops min. of 15"; 30" high tops min. of 18".


sully

(post #104921, reply #19 of 20)

Thanks for the photos and various numbers on overhang.

I'm really not of fan of granite countertops and the like. Its cold and not really a friend to glass items which are common in a kitchen.

No disrespect to the photos, those kitchens looked sharp.

It also seems to be the favorite buzzword for realtors.

Hi, new here and going to (post #104921, reply #20 of 20)

Hi, new here and going to decor my kitchen here in Australia. I have just shifted in Sydney from America. I am just confuse which bar stools will look elegant and in fashion now. I am interested in wooden and bit high. What you guys say?

Shop online Bar Stools Australia on SALE.