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Bathroom Ceiling: Skim coat, or more?

rasher's picture

I'm fixin' to get started on my bathroom ceiling. Here's what I know: Originally plaster over lath, somebody came through and tried to fix cracking with fibermesh tape and probably regular joint compound. Now, there are lots of hairline cracks and many places where the repair is spalling off, most chips are the size of a dime or so. Some of it is puckering. If I run a still knife over it, I can get most of the chips knocked off, but the stuff that remains is pretty sturdy.

I'm hoping there is a recommended fix that doesn't involve tearing it all down or adding another layer of drywall over the mess.

Would any of you advise this: knocking as much off as I can, skimming the rough spots flat with setting-type compound and then going over the whole thing with a drying-type "putty" coat or "skim coat"? When/where should I use mesh?

(post #106815, reply #1 of 11)

http://www.fry-wagner.com

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A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #106815, reply #2 of 11)

Not to sure about the answer link? you gave? I thought he was looking for some mud advise?

(post #106815, reply #3 of 11)

Come on' its obvious. The header in that web-site said "Moving into the Future".


You must do the same. Remove the plaster (you really wouldnt need to remove the lath), and move into the future with safe, clean, Gypsum board.


Cut to fit, paint to match



 


 


 


Family.....They're always there when they need you.


Edited 8/8/2008 9:24 pm ET by MSA1

 

Family.....They're always there when they need you.

(post #106815, reply #4 of 11)

Do I smell a d-mix thread heating up?

Bob's next test date: 12/10/07

(post #106815, reply #5 of 11)

be a lot easier to add a sheet of SR over it

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #106815, reply #6 of 11)

The reason you have the flaws now is that whoever tried to fix this before screwed up and did not get a good bond for whatever reason.

That means to make it happen, you need to start by removing all their junk built up, then clean the surface left, then roll on a bonding agent, then you are ready to start anew.

All that with a 60% chance it will work out fine. a bathroom is a hostile environment for this sort of thing.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #106815, reply #7 of 11)

I saw a fix by a tile setter I thought was impressive. I would never have tried it myself.


He cleaned the ceiling down to solid surface, then skimmed a coat of Keraflex. It had enough tooth to hold onto a skim of joint compound. He didn't mind a rustic (rough) look and painted that.


It's in his house and I curiously check on it each time I visit him. About eight years and no signs of trouble.

(post #106815, reply #8 of 11)

What's Keraflex?

(post #106815, reply #9 of 11)

A brand of thinset

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #106815, reply #10 of 11)

Thanks.


If it works for him, that's great, but I don't think I would ever try it.  Not only does it seem hard to apply, but I would be concerned about the additional weight.

(post #106815, reply #11 of 11)

grab 2 sheets of 1/2 rock,mark your joist and hang some new rock with 2" screws and your done forever. you will be glad you did.larry

if a man speaks in the forest,and there's not a woman to hear him,is he still wrong?

the older i get ,

the more people tick me off