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Bathtub on concrete floor?

Senna's picture

How do I plumb for a bathtub on a concrete basement floor? The tub I have has drains the are beneath the bottom of the tubs plywood base. Is that normal?

A couple of years ago I worked with a friend - a plumber by trade - who helped me install the correct plumbing for a basement bathroom. We capped the pipe for the tub/shower so I now I have to install a trap and connection for the tubs drain. Do I have to cut out an area of floor for the drain pipes under the tub or should I rest the tub on sleepers?

(post #95916, reply #1 of 10)

Either..


The old shower drain should have a trap in it...



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming....

                                                                   WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #95916, reply #3 of 10)

It's a new install which I did with the help of a plumber. We plumbed all the drains and vents right up to the trap. We stopped short because I wasn't sure what tub/shower unit I wanted to use.

At the time I was thinking more of a shower than a tub. I am not sure how a tub gets plumbed when there is a concrete floor in the way.


Edited 8/18/2004 11:37 am ET by ASENNAD

(post #95916, reply #5 of 10)

Cut out the floor and make all the room you can get for the plumbing...


Dig down...


Install the trap..


Put yur tub in like it was sitting on any floor..


Replace the busted out CC with CLEAN sand....


Get the SO in there with you and test drive..



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming....

                                                                   WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #95916, reply #7 of 10)

"Put yur tub in like it was sitting on any floor..

Replace the busted out CC with CLEAN sand...."

So no need to replace the concrete? Just sand? Don't have to worry about bugs and things? Sure would make life simpler I guess.

(post #95916, reply #8 of 10)

Clean sand and and add a bit of bleach to the sand if yur worried about bugs..


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming....

                                                                   WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #95916, reply #9 of 10)

If yur only busting out a foot square or so.. 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming....

                                                                   WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #95916, reply #2 of 10)

If it is a correct new install Imerc is right it should have a trap already installed.  Otherwise you need to cut out a section of the concrete or space the tub up so you can get the trap under it.  Hope its all vented and the sewer line is low enough for it all to flow down.  DanT

(post #95916, reply #4 of 10)

We just did this a week ago with our new house. First, the plumber installed his roughin plumbing in the gravel below the location of the tub drain. Then we built an 8"x8"x8" block of framing lumber and placed it directly above the roughed-in drain. When we poured the slab there was a nice space left for him to build his trap in.


Hope this helps,


 


Scott.

(post #95916, reply #6 of 10)

You can rent an electic jackhammer. It's easier than you might think.


Al Mollitor, Sharon MA

(post #95916, reply #10 of 10)

electic jackhammer. It's easier than you might think


While you are at the rental shop, get a 12" saw; then down to the bix box for cut off wheels for the saw (or just the one diamond blade).  A saw kerf makes a much cleaner joint.  Which is easier to cope with if you patch back the concrete.  Which is not absolutely necessary as has already been pointed out.


Occupational hazard of my occupation not being around (sorry Bubba)
I may not be able to help you Occupational hazard of my occupation not being around (sorry Bubba)