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Best way to seal toilet to floor?

geoffhazel's picture

We have a toilet that is in close proximity to a curbless shower, and sometimes water splashing from the shower gets onto and under the toilet and drips down through the floor into the living space below.


I could just run a hefty bead of silicone or similar material on the bottom of the toilet prior to resetting it, but was wondering if anyone had experience with any other method, like perhaps a neoprene stick on strip like weatherstripping, or other way you do it that you like for ease of installation, functionality, and durability?


FYI, the floor is a 2" square grouted ceramic tile, on a slight slope so the water drains properly.

(post #103582, reply #1 of 18)

Normally no seal is needed, but in your case silicone would seem to be a reasonable choice.

(Probably best to run the silicone around the joint after setting the stool, vs bedding the stool with silicone. Easier to pull the stool if needed, that way, and should provide as good of a seal.)


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Edited 3/24/2007 6:21 pm by DanH


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #103582, reply #2 of 18)

 Good job Dan. That's a common consensus.


However, sometimes debris wants to gather on the silicon as it's rough texture seems to act as a magnet.


Might something else be a better choice although not much else might make a better functional seal than the silicon?


 


I never had a problem with character,
people've been telling me I was one ever since I was a kid.


 

 

(post #103582, reply #4 of 18)

Well we can always have the "best bathroom caulk" debate, but I know the characteristics of silicone and know it to be at least adequate for the task. Don't know the others.


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #103582, reply #5 of 18)

Why not remove the seat and roll a thin rope of plumber's putty around the perimeter? Still seems odd... you're sure that's where the leak is from?

(post #103582, reply #6 of 18)

Plumbers putty might be a good choice, actually.


Yes, I'm certain thats where the leak is from.  I was informed by the tenant below that there was a small leak in HER bathroom ceiling, and upon inspection, I found some very soft, in fact, VERY soft sheetrock. Started pulling it away and found a drip of clean water on the lower side 3" drain line from the toilet.  I also noticed some water stains on the underside of the wood thats holding up the concrete pan.  And there isn't much water, just a drip, so I suspect that over the last few years, a teaspoon here, one there.


And I DID have a silicone bead around the perimeter of the toilet, but its come away in spots.  Thats one reason why I'm leaning more toward something UNDER the toilet vs. around it.


One fly in the ointment is that because the floor has a little slope, it's not quite flat compared to the bottom of the toilet, so it wants to rock, and needs to be shimmed here and there to be stable.  Gotta figure that into the plan to reseat the toilet.


 

(post #103582, reply #7 of 18)

A problem with plumber's putty is that it will stain any porous surface.

Yes, you definitely need to prevent the toilet from rocking, or anything you use to seal will break loose.


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #103582, reply #17 of 18)

Permagum works like Pl Putty and will not stain or dry out.


http://www.virginiakmp.us/uploadBulletins/Permagum.pdf

For those who have fought for it Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

(post #103582, reply #16 of 18)

Could you use that sill seal that comes in rolls?--its blue and flexible like stretchy foam about a quarter inch thick and is corrugated longitudinally. That should compress somewhat evenly to make a seal--it comes in 8" wide rolls, so you'd need to cut it--it cuts easily. Or better would be the weatherstripping that's used under garage doors, or even caulk backer rod.

(post #103582, reply #18 of 18)

Why not remove the seat and roll a thin rope of plumber's putty around the perimeter


Sheeze, I was starting to wonder if I was the only person who used plumber's putty.  And leave a finger or two width at the back open.


jt8


"We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But the ocean would be less because of that missing drop."
-- Mother Teresa

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #103582, reply #3 of 18)

  Look for a removable caulk for temporairly sealing windows in the winter. Its clear and removes easially.

(post #103582, reply #8 of 18)

   Outline the floor around the toilet with masking tape.


  Mix up the same grout used on the floor and lay a thin line of it just inside the taped outline.


  Reset with a new wax ring and clean up the excess grout.


  It'll solve the leak and the rock n' roll motion.


  30 years ago an old plumber taught me this technique and it's the way I've set every toilet I've ever done...buic

(post #103582, reply #9 of 18)

BUIC, that is just the ticket.


I shimmed the initial install 8 yrs ago with short plastic shims, but they had worked loose, and subsequent rocking had broken the wax seal.


So... new seal, grout under the toilet, and we should be good for another 10 years or more.


 

(post #103582, reply #11 of 18)

   I've found setting them this way is a plus in many ways.


  NO movement of the toilet is easier on the bolts, the flange, and the wax ring.


  And the confidence you feel from sitting on a steady bowl....


  priceless    (sorry, couldn't resist!) buic

(post #103582, reply #12 of 18)

That's my prefered method, I set the toilet after tile but before grout. I grout the toilet in same time as I do the floor.

If you didn't have time to do it right the first time, how come you've got time to do it over again?

(post #103582, reply #10 of 18)

No expert on plumbing but when I have had to set/reset toilets for this or that job I always seal with a bead of clear silicone.  If you read the installation literature most rec. this.  However, I DO NOT seal around the back 1/3 of where the unit meets the floor so that if there is leakage from flushing the toilet, at the wax ring, you'll see it and it the leakage won't be trapped by the seal.

(post #103582, reply #13 of 18)

Whenever I set a toilet I use extra wax that I stuff all around the toilet flange to seal the flange to the floor.  I do this so that if there is a leak it runs out onto the bathroom floor instead of onto the head of the tenant on the floor below.  In your case this will keep any water that happens to run under the toilet from getting into the floor.  I personally hate silicone, but that's another story.

(post #103582, reply #14 of 18)

just a word of caution when you seal your toilet to keep water out you are also seling to to keep water in. Should your toilet leak you will not knowit untill you have a major problem.  I would suggest if you are going to seal it to leave a gap for a weep hole.


Edited 3/28/2007 11:37 am ET by rpj2Construction

(post #103582, reply #15 of 18)

Link was sealing the hole in the floor, which is a good idea. (I've done the same with silicone, etc.) That way a leak is more likely to flood the floor around the toilet (and hopefully be noticed), and less likely to get into the framing.


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville