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Can I frame a stud wall on top of a ceramic tile floor?

DArcyM's picture

The kitchen floor in my 90 year old brick house has been updated with ceramic tile by a previous owner.  The wall behind the stove holds simple built-in upper cupboards against the original lath and plaster wall concealing about a 1 inch space to the brick behind, but a false wall of unframed sheetrock has been rigged to hang from the front lower lip of those cupboards, forming the counter's backsplash, about 8 inches out from the original wall.

I need to build a proper stud framed wall in front of the original to hang a range hood and cabinets on, (and to insulate) but the wall's sole plate will rest directly on the tiled floor, as things stand at the moment.  Is that acceptable, or do I need to demolish the tile and whatever's beneath it to have my sole plate directly contact the original wood floor? (not looking forward to that prospect.)  The wall needs to be sturdy to support the weight of the range hood and whatever cabinets end up hanging on it.

 D    

I'm going out on a limb, but (post #201021, reply #1 of 7)

I'm going out on a limb, but I think you would be ok to frame it on top of the tile.  You'll need to drill clearance holes in the plate, then drill holes through the tile with a tile bit.  Use some deck screws to attach the plate to the framing or sub floor.  I wouldn't glue it down, since that probably wouldn't help hold it and may cause problems..

Mark's right on all counts. (post #201021, reply #2 of 7)

No problem, drill the slightly oversize holes for the fasteners through the tile.  Don't force fit but don't float the wall either.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


You do want to make sure (post #201021, reply #3 of 7)

You do want to make sure first that the tile is well bedded on a proper substrate, so that the weight of the wall is not apt to damage the tile.  And, of course, if there might be a desire to change out the tile in the near future, now would be the time to do it.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Don't do it! Tiles are (post #201021, reply #4 of 7)

Don't do it!

Tiles are never flat- and what will you do when you want to change the floor? Do you want the wood to 'sponge up' any water that the tile sends its' way?

There's a variety of ways to cut the tiles where the framing will go.

AE, (post #201021, reply #6 of 7)

this is behind the range.

It's not a church.  There is no sin in rigging this up the way he's suggesting.

What'll he do if he changes out the floor?  Deal with it then.

or, deal with it now,  pop up the tiles that the wall sits on, clean off the thinset, cut them to fit after the wall is in place.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Do you want the wood to (post #201021, reply #7 of 7)

Do you want the wood to 'sponge up' any water that the tile sends its' way?

Actually, cutting out the tile would make the water situation worse -- the wall, rather than sitting on top of the tile would sit in a ditch which would take a long time to dry if water got in.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

You're not building (post #201021, reply #5 of 7)

You're not building structure, you just need the wall to support cabinets and drywall where the load is mostly straight down. If water is a concern lay down a PT sole plate in a thick bed of polyurethane and go to it. Put in a few Tapcons but do your drilling in the grout lines to make it easy. You can fasten the top plate  to the ceiling or use some clips to attach it to the original framing.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.