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Cold weather install of asphalt shingles

JohnT8's picture

Just curious what everyone's take was on installing asphalt shingles in cold weather?


I've always heard that asphalt shingles needed to be installed in warm weather so that the sun beating down can weld them together.   But the current projection on my project house is that we won't get to the roof until the weather turns cold.  I'd like to wait until Spring, but suspect that the current ones won't last until spring


(probably 15 year asphalt shingles which have been on for about 35 years...they are disintegrating)


jt8


"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success."  --Albert Schweitzer

jt8

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(post #102113, reply #1 of 15)

They'll seal eventually on a sunny day. We roof all winter (as precipitation and frost allows) and I've never had any problems. Care needs to be taken that the bundles are stored flat and and covered. If you lay a bundle over the ridge over night, the shingles will not want to lay flat. If they get wet, they'll stick together if it's below freezing. Slightly different set of rules for winter, otherwise, no problem.

 


"Let's go to Memphis in the meantime, baby" - John Hiatt.


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(post #102113, reply #2 of 15)

I agree with seeyou. I shingled my roof last winter and the temps never got out of the 30s. The only problems were cutting them and laying em through the valleys. We ended up using a heat gun to soften them up. Kinda slow and worked like a champ. Just don't freeze to death.

(post #102113, reply #3 of 15)

The heat from the attic as well as sunny days melt them together in the cold months.


    


What the problem is? 

Matt- Woods favorite carpenter. 

(post #102113, reply #4 of 15)

The only problem probably would be high winds in the days after you shingle.  If they have not sealed then you could lose a few but that would be minor and fairly remote.

(post #102113, reply #5 of 15)

Build a temp shed with 2x and ply, put the shingles and a propane heater in there. Next day the shingles are a toasty 60-70*


works great...even in the cold northeast winters


 

                      I've upped my standards...now up yours

(post #102113, reply #6 of 15)

Thanks for all the replies.  I feel a lot better about waiting now.

jt8


"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success."  --Albert Schweitzer

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #102113, reply #7 of 15)

We're all just telling you what you want to hear. I wouldn't shingle my own house if it was less than 90 degrees. ;>

 


"Let's go to Memphis in the meantime, baby" - John Hiatt.


http://grantlogan.net/

(post #102113, reply #11 of 15)

We're all just telling you what you want to hear.


Too late!  It has already percolated into my brain, "cold weather install OK".  The professionals said so.


I wouldn't shingle my own house if it was less than 90 degrees. ;>


Who you kidding, you'd wait until it was 110 and then send Sphere up on your roof.  ;)


 


 


jt8


"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success."  --Albert Schweitzer

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #102113, reply #8 of 15)

(probably 15 year asphalt shingles which have been on for about 35 years...they are disintegrating)


 


I'm glad I am not tearing that roof off  :-)



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If it wasn’t for the Bank Payments,

Interest, Taxes, Wages, and Fuel Costs,

I wouldn’t have to charge you!!

(post #102113, reply #9 of 15)

Around here they roof until it's too cold, which means temps below about 10F, I'd guess, depending on the wind. It just takes a few sunny days to seal the shingles pretty well. You have a slight risk of some blow-off if you get unlucky the first winter, but the roofer should warrant for that.


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(post #102113, reply #10 of 15)

I am in Mn, and have a big old house with a complicated roof.

I have a roofer I absolutely trust, and he wanted to do the roof in the dead of winter, since he wouldn't have to worry about rain.

Took him forever, but the job was perfect. That was five years ago.

However, he is one tough dude, since the temps were low and there was plenty of snow.

********************************************************
"It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts."

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******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #102113, reply #12 of 15)

I'm also in MN and installed a roof in November. Within days the majority of the roof had sealed down from the Sun. The snow that landed a week later held the rest of the roof until Spring.


Only problem I found was the tar strip can flake. Hit it with a hammer or flex the shingle. You will want to sweep the roof or the tar chunks become a permanent part of the roof.

(post #102113, reply #13 of 15)

John,


If you're using archys they will look sh***ty until Spring since the way they're packaged will affect how they lay if it's below freezing when you install them.


If it is cold and using archys I'd suggest hand nailing to help eliminate  some of the blow thru you'll have with an air gun.


Cold weather roofing usually means a shorter workday-trying to work while the sun has some heat. It's slower but no reason a nice roof can't be done in the Winter.


Walter

(post #102113, reply #14 of 15)

John,


I shingled the roof of our new house in November of 2000 in Western New York.   We had a nice strech of weather to get all the shingles down.  However one day it was 70 degrees and the next day we were expecting highs in the 30s. 


We knew that the shingles had not set up so we went out and purchased tubes of roofing tar.  And sealed up those we could.


That night we had winds at over 60 MPH.  I end up loosing about 6 squares of Oakridge architectural shingles.   The tar helped but we could not get to the whoe house.  The shingles were all over the place.  I am still finding pieces of them in the lawn and woods by our house. 


So you just have to ask yourself "do you feel lucky?"


Good luck,


Michael


 


 

(post #102113, reply #15 of 15)

You get a 60 mph wind on the night after you lay shingles you might loose some no matter what the season is.

 


"Let's go to Memphis in the meantime, baby" - John Hiatt.


http://grantlogan.net/