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Covering wood foundations wall above ground

Dawemv's picture

I have built a wood foundation wall and will use the Blue skin to water proof it below ground and I would like to use the dimpled ABS plastic sheet over that if you think it is necessary. I would like to know the following.

1/ Can I install blue skin right over the pressure treated wood or do I need a primer first.

2/ Do I need the ABS plastic dimpled Sheeting over the blue skin.

3/ If I use the ABS plastic dimpled sheet and it is above ground, what can I install over it for a finished look.

4/ If I do not use the ABS plastic Dimples sheet, what do I place over the blue skin above reound to have a finished look.

Maanufactrurers instructions (post #206181, reply #1 of 4)

Maanufactrurers instructions and material data sheets cover a world of informaation.

 

I don't know what blue skin is and have never done a wood foundation, but I would study on both before proceeding.

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

I believe "Blueskin" is a (post #206181, reply #2 of 4)

I believe "Blueskin" is a brand of IWS "peel & stick" similar to Grace. It's basically a rolled sheet of bitumen mixed with fiberglass.

I'm not a big fan of wood foundations, and I've never seen any manufacturer's data sheet for wood founcation use, but Blueskin is promoted as a solution for concrete foundations.

With almost all the peel and (post #206181, reply #3 of 4)

With almost all the peel and stick products if it needs to stay well adhered to a verticle surface above grade you'll want to use one of the primers, at least along edges, especially the upper edge.   It doesn't help the waterproof propertiers, it just keeps it in place.    If it's undergrade the backfill will keep it in place, but it's often a good idea to use something to keep the upper edge in place - either a temp 2x4 or primer.

If it were me I'd run the waterproofing membrane continously up to the top of the wood foundation covering the above grade portion.  There's nothing wrong with wrapping the membrane up and over the top, stapling it in place on the top surface.  The rim and floor joists can rest on the membrane without problems as long as the membrane is put down smoothly.  If you're sloppy with it it won't be smooth at all and you don't want to put framing on that.

The dimple sheets are just to keep poor draining soll away from the foundation and isn't needed above grade, although it wouldn't be wrong to run that to the top of the foundation wall if you're covering the above grade portion with something like a stone veneer that covers over it easily.

As far as what to cover the above grade portion with I really like the look of stone, but there's nothing wrong with a stucco.  If you're insulating the foundation I'd probably run the insulation on the outside of the wall from footer on up and use a synthetic stucco in the above grade portions just like and ICF foundation above grade.  The foam is secured with washer head fasteners in that situation.

I'm assuming you've used the propper grade of pressure treated wood for the foundation (a much higher grade than that sold for decks and whatnot). 

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

There are foam panels (post #206181, reply #4 of 4)

There are foam panels available that are covered with a stucco or river stone finish, intended, I believe, for mobile home skirting and the like.  You could probably attach these to the wood foundation (flashed at the top) and have a fairly nice looking finish.

I don't know if it would be best, though, to attach them directly to the wall (over your membrane) or instead use dimpled sheet or furring to hold the panels out a hair and allow drainage behind.


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