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Cultured Stone Foundation Facade

Snort's picture

I'm interested in putting something like Eldorado Stone on a block foundation. The foundation height above grade will be around 1-4'.

The Eldorado site says not run it below grade. It also seems to show it stuck to the foundation, and not sitting on a ledge. I am wondering, too, how folks cap a facade off under the siding.

So, I'd appreciate anyone sharing actual experiences, details, or pictures to help me get this a little clearer in my mind. Thanks.

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #1 of 19)

Holly, I often make copper water table to cover the transition. I've also seen that stuff installed directly to block or poured concrete. Have you checked for an online installation manual?

(post #103926, reply #2 of 19)

A copper water table would look sharp, yes...man, I wish you worked closer!

I watched the installation video, sigh, hope it doesn't ruin the book<G>

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #3 of 19)

hey mr.snort I use metal drip edge on top of eldorado stone water table units,or if a watertable is not specified I just use a premade section of brown flashing , that a sheet metal dude bends for me in 10ft. lenghths. If you need any of that W.T. material I have a lot of that stuff I ordered for a job and the cust. changed her mind and didnt use , contact me if interested. You don,t need a ledge for the wall stone as it adheres to the wall  via suction when you install it .

(post #103926, reply #6 of 19)

Hey Deduya, glad you chimed in...does the foundation get stuccoed from grade up to the weep screed? The web site shows that to be around 4", is that about right?

Thanks for the cap offer, you're outside of Radford aren't you? I might be taking you up on that.

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #8 of 19)

Snort this makes the 3 reply ive tried to send you but my little girl thinks she can tpye better than me ---i'll get back to you  when she is not so demanding---2  yrs. old and a diva in the making.

(post #103926, reply #9 of 19)

Makes glad I've ony got boys, I can just tie them up<G>

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #10 of 19)

on the last few big jobs ive been on the weepscreeens /holes where handled a differant way, some where built so that any collected water ran on top of the flashing, and the last job I did they speced out that a weeep screen was to be installed behind the stone ---all I can tell you when that type of 'rock' gets and stayes damp it efforiences like all get out looks like  its trying to grow a fur coat, when its my job to follow the directions I do it like the scmatics on the web site. also eldorado has a very good tech support and will put ypu in touch with your area tech person.----4 " is about right...got to go lay some rock now my wife finnally got up she works all 7p to 7 a  as a OB. nurse

(post #103926, reply #12 of 19)

Man, I don't want to shaving any rocks<G>

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #4 of 19)

Snort!


     If you look closely at my house you'll see that for much less than the cost of cultured stone I installed real granite veneer.


   I had the local granite quarry cut me some 2 inch thick pieces and used a hammer drill to  bore holes in the back which I put some lead anchors into. I then thru bolted the block with the hammer drioll and bolted it all in place.


 looks like my foundation is granite!  Much more elegant than that cultured stone which looks fake from a mile away..


 If you are going to cover the foundation which I greatly applaude do it with real stone or brick.. build a ledge, pour a footing, whatever and use real not fake!

(post #103926, reply #5 of 19)

Frenchy, you bolted each piece of stone to your foundation?


How much did you spend on bolts & whatever & how long did this take?


No wonder you aren't finished.


Joe H

(post #103926, reply #14 of 19)

JoeH


 Yes, I did and no it didn't take all that long.. I can't tell you because I would do a section at a time. If I were to guess I'd estimate somewhere around 40 to 50 hours total..


  How much did I spend?  Well I'd guess somewhere around $1000 for the granite give or take a big chunk and maybe $40.00 /$50.00 worth of hardware..

(post #103926, reply #16 of 19)

Ah, I was thinking small stones, thousands of them, not 5 foot wide pieces.


Thinking all thread or something times hundreds or thousands and holes times thousands + $$$$ for all thread and zillions of hours too.


Now I got it, still can't say it would be the method I'd pick but if it worked, it worked.


Joe H

(post #103926, reply #17 of 19)

Good stone, around here is a rare commodity...now, if I could figure out some way to use clay<G>

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #7 of 19)

<If you look closely at my house you'll see that for much less than the cost of cultured stone I installed real granite veneer.>

Hey Frenchy, I'd love to look closely at your house...how bout some pics? Ha!

Good on ya for using real stone, but this is a spec, and I've got to get it done in this millenium<G>

And really, I can't see anything from even a 1/2 mile away, and with the right landscaping, I'm sure no one else will, either.

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #15 of 19)

Snort,


  I did post some pictures a month or so back. Go to the archieves and punch in 85891.1 


  I admit I spent about 40 or 50 hours doing it, not as long as you'd think.  I bought  Hilti hammer drill and in a couple of minutes I'd  be thru the concrete and marking the stone where the hole needed to be. A few minutes with an impact wrench and everything would be snugged up. I did cheat a bit using a floor jack to hold everything into place while I did the drilling but I kid you not that Hilti really made quick work of it.  I did need a 24 inch long bit because my foundation is 22 inches thick. I think the bit was something like $115 or so but so what!


 Each granite piece was 5 feet long and 2 feet high. the thickness was a fraction past 3 inches thick so it was easy to put a lead anchor in the hole and have the bolt tighten up quickly..


 I was surprised at how cheap the granite was.. I think I spent about a grand,, maybe.. I also got enough to put a cap on the stone walls on either side of my driveway at the same time..


 Please remember just how cheap I am.. 50,000 bd.ft of hardwood like black walnut, cherry, maple, white oak etc. cost me around $20,000. 


 I bought a pallet load of really thick copper for $200 and today a sheet like that would sell for about $200.00   (all my flashing etc. is from that same  pallet of copper)! 

(post #103926, reply #11 of 19)

We've used El Dorado stone on a few projects, to cap the ledge between siding and stone they have cap stones with a wash on them.  The stone is "stuck" to the side of the builidng much like tile is set to a wall so a brick ledge is not necessary.


Team Logo

(post #103926, reply #13 of 19)

Did the masons use a weep screen?

Outside of the gates the trucks were unloadin',
The weather was hot, a-nearly 90 degrees.
The man standin' next to me, his head was exploding,
Well, I was prayin' the pieces wouldn't fall on me.

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #103926, reply #19 of 19)

Snort,


  I  do not no much about masonry so I'm un-familiar with a weep screen.


For exterior applications we install 30lb felt to the building and leave it for them.  From there, from what I've seen, they staple/nail on expanded wire lath and set directly to that.


I can see why you would want a weep area in back of the stone though I'm not sure how it would work with a stone that is directly set to the substrate?


For interior applications they have been willing to set it directly to sheetrock with the expanded wire lath, though we install plywood or OSB in areas that will receive the stone.


All the El Dorado product line I've seen installed looks very very similar to real stone to my eye except when you come up to a house and notice it is suspended above the ground, something most people will not notice.  There are other faux stones I've seen that I wouldn't think of using because they look blatantly fake.


Team Logo

(post #103926, reply #18 of 19)

Eldorado's wainscot cap trim should work for you.  A kickout base flash under your bottom course of siding will sit atop the sloped-top cap and look just fine.

 

"A stripe is just as real as a dadgummed flower."

Gene Davis        1920-1985