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Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty

mbdyer's picture

We have begun using this product at work (trimming) aand so far I like it.  It sets up in good time, seems durable and sands nicely.  One thing is it doesn't seem to take stain quickly but will after a few coats (if veneer gets any thinner it'll be tissue paper).  Does anyone have any misgivings or problems with it?  How about good experiences or novel ideas?

(post #98369, reply #1 of 16)

I've used it for closing up seams in flooring underlayment.

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Let me drop everything I'm doing so I can work on your problem!

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Let me drop everything I'm doing so I can work on your problem!

(post #98369, reply #2 of 16)

I've been using it for 25 years or more. I found that it does not take stain at all.Can be used for exterior nail holes if painted right away. There are better fillers for exterior though. I just used it yesterday to fix scratches in a drawing board. Seems the board was used for mat cutting   and anything else that wood scratch it.I mixed the powder to a thin paste, about the consistency of heavy cream. Trowled it on, let dry and sanded it this morning. The board is as good as new.


The only downside I can think of besides not taking stains is the setup time. It sets quickly,ten minutes or so in warm weather.Mix small batches, it is usually ready to sand if needed in under 3 hours.


mike

(post #98369, reply #3 of 16)

> There are better fillers for exterior though.


What do you like better?  I've always liked Durham's.


 


-- J.S.


 

 

 

-- J.S.

 

(post #98369, reply #14 of 16)

Elmers makes an exterior putty that works well. It can be sanded like water putty and dries fairly quick. The elmers putty can be used for large areas too, Water putty used outside should be confined to nail holes, I found that large areas will crack even when painted, interior use I had no problems with cracking.


mike

(post #98369, reply #10 of 16)

I remember a carpenter using something to color this putty as he mixed it up. I don't remember what he used but it looked like tubes of artist paints. Might have been oil, acrylic or water color but it worked pretty well. When dry it was close to the base wood and after using a stain it was so good a match that finding the putty would be difficult.

If you used this product a lot it might be worth it to buy some tubes of artist's paints and give it a go. With what you don't use you can take up landscape painting. Something to decorate the walls of the houses you work on.

(post #98369, reply #4 of 16)

I used it a few times many years ago for some exterior projects, and it just didn't work.

the one project I remember was a storm door, which I stripped, and used this putty to fill a big hole (from an old lock set). Even though I ran some screws in to anchor the putty, it blew off the paint in about a year or so.

After that I discovered epoxy putty, and have always used that instead (with great success).

I know they sell huge quantities of this stuff, and I am also curious to know the best applications for the product.

********************************************************
"I tend to live in the past because most of my life is there."
-- Herb Caen (1916-1997)

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #98369, reply #5 of 16)

I'm using it on interior work, mostly to smooth out veneered mdf paneling, repair veneer tearout from router or saw, fill paintgrade poplar trim (crown, chair rail, etc) and even patch sheetrock.  I've noted that it wipes away with a damp rag over prefinish (a plus) and I have gotten it to take a stain by layering the patch with stain followed by clearcoat, wash, rinse repeat...

(post #98369, reply #6 of 16)

Mix it with Titebond II or III, it really rocks for that strikeplate repair that needs a dutchman, but someone is in a hurry.


I repaired a few fluted columns that exploded, the thickener was helpfull....damn, I just gave away a trade secret.


  Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks

Is Gunner more happy, now.?


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #98369, reply #7 of 16)

I asve up using it for exterior after seeing it fail from water exposure, but if that Titebond II trick works, it would be less expensive than the Minwax wood filler I use now. is it harder to sand the excess off though?

I use it a lot for interior paint grade stuff. Never could get it to take stain.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #98369, reply #8 of 16)

First, I try to not sand off any excess, but yes..it is a "clog the paper" type thing.


I use 3M GOLD ( non stearated) Sandy paper..I have a plethora from my past work in developing finishes, and have not tried the newer abrasives yet.


I have also found that "tooling" it with custom ground scrapers ( from heavy lumber banding strap steel) is LOT faster.


I have not yet had an oppertunity to try staining it, my stain grade work does not need filling..no brag here, but it takes primer and paint better than the wood.


Try Titebond I for interior, a bit of water too....not just glue.


I also have added some sanding dust in the mix..it is a HECK of a lot cheaper, and always available.


Experiment, I did.  One can add a poly ( water based) as a rehydrater also. Or Shellac. They both are compatible..with aliphatic resins in "GLUE".


You can also mix it with PL...but becareful..it is ROCKHARD.


  Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks

Is Gunner more happy, now.?


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #98369, reply #9 of 16)

I remmeber I did once use it exterior to build up a patch on the corner of a unique crown molding. I mixed it with that pink latex bonding sealer made for preping plaster patching. Seemed to me that it kicked slower but tooled nice, and finished off hard. It looked cute, a pink corner up on the end of that roof for a couple days before I painted it. That patch was still there six or seven years later when I finally tore the whole end of that house apart to add on.

Amazing how versatile that rock hard is.

I once learned the hard way not to use hot water with it. I was on a job where the only water availabel was the tea water in my thermos, and the linoleum had to be done that day - or else.
That mix set up rock harf on my mixing pan in the time it took to spread the first trowel full on a joint. Took one dab and spread it, turned and practically bent the trowel sticking it into that glob.
So I melted some snow in the water to have it cool enough to work with. Colder it is, the slower it sets up.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #98369, reply #11 of 16)

Yeah, it is tintable..tho' I have not tried it too much..Might have to give it a go.


Being a cheapskate packrat like I am, I save almost all empty containers for "stuff"..I recylclen what ever I can, but them damm pry off lids still don't fly...LOL


I'll have to post about my newest spill proof , ruby juice flux cup I invented..( oh, gawd, I am turning into Greencu)..lemme work out the bugs and I'll post a method for those that solder Cu.


  Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks

Is Gunner more happy, now.?


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #98369, reply #12 of 16)

What would be the right additive/mixative to use for making dentures?

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #98369, reply #13 of 16)

LMAO...HAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA


 


My new one is all UV cured resin..I got a temp, all plastic. 440.00$ ....she even colered it for my coffee and cigarrette color, ya can't tell.


I gotta run down to the shop and play with this stuff, maybe add some Bondo..?


In my mouth?


  Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks

Is Gunner more happy, now.?


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #98369, reply #15 of 16)

I once showed up for a job, and got a while you are here, how about rehanding this door? Door and jamb both dark stained pine...a little black coffee instead of water, and who needs minwax<G>smelled good, too!

Don't worry, we can fix that later!

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #98369, reply #16 of 16)

I have used it inside & outside off & on for years.


trouble is i have not checked up on any of them.


outside I use glazing compound for nail holes and minor divots.


bondo for the gaping gashes.


Once i had to repair some "significant" rot on some garage windows in a masonry garage.


After removing as much deadwood as I could, I applied a liberal coat of minwax wood hardener and used resorcinol glue thickened with dust from the beltsander bag, as a preliminary fill.


It was sandable and chiselable after and I finish-filled with Durhams.


ACTUALLY, IT'S QUITE GOOD ON TOAST!


 

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