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Finishing a gap between drywall and wood

KidBuilder's picture

Hey Guys,

Got a little unique situation that I could use some advice on. I have a 4'x6' sliding window (Andersen 400 series) that I have installed on a bathroom job I am doing. The inside of the jamb, which is primed pine and has trim on this particular style that really is designed to receive wood casing. The clients don't want that, instead they want a drywall "look" on all four sides right up to the jamb trim. Probably a little hard to picture, but basically my delima is I can only rock up to about 3/4 to 1" from the trim, so I have a gap that needs to be filled flush to the window trim on the one side and flush to my sheetrock on the other. I am concerned that trying to fill this gap with standard joint compound will not yield very satisfactory results.

Any suggestions, ideas? Someone mentioned to me a USG product called "structo-lite", which I've never used, but I looked at the product page from USG and it seemed like a product for plastering only.

Thanks! Much appreciated!!

(post #107427, reply #1 of 14)

Why not L-metal ?

(post #107427, reply #7 of 14)

Unfortunately I only have 1/4" of clearance from the face of my drywall to the "face" of the jamb.

(post #107427, reply #2 of 14)

Why can't you run the sheetrock closer? 


Is the face of the "jamb" in the same plane as the sheetrock?


filling and flat taping or L-bead is the usual method. 


A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



http://www.quittintime.com/


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #107427, reply #8 of 14)

The jamb trim is sitting only 1/4" shy of thew face of my drywall.  So 3/4" to 1" is as close as I can get unless I ran 1/4" over the top of my 1/2" and butted that edge to the jamb, but then I would have a tough time finishing that 1/4" edge I think.

(post #107427, reply #9 of 14)

I read this 2 different ways - either you're saying there is a large gap between the drywall and window jamb that you intended to cover with trim, and your customer blew that idea by saying they don't want trim, or the window jamb is 1/4" shy of the surface of the drywall, and you want it to be square, like a drywall return.


In scenario 1, I would pack the void with insulation, then make a thick mix of duro-90 to fill it flush. Then tape over it to tie it all together. It will crack for sure without tape.


In scenario 2, I would rip thin strips to extend the jamb flush with the drywall. Sand the primer from the edge of the jamb and glue the extension strips, with some finish nails to pull it tight.


In either case, you'll get your square edge with your prefered type of corner bead.


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(post #107427, reply #10 of 14)

I had some ideas, but without a picture or a clear description, I can't really contribute anything worthwhile.  I need to understand the situation first.

 “Good work costs much more than poor imitation or factory product” Charles Greene
CaliforniaRemodelingContractor.com

(post #107427, reply #13 of 14)

Lack of a clear understanding of a situation has never prevented me from opening my big mouth. Rather, I see it as more of a challenge. Hit a nail in the dark? No problem. Just need a bigger hammer.


See my work at TedsCarpentry.com
Buy Cheap Tools! BuildersTools.net

~ Ted W ~

(post #107427, reply #14 of 14)

Man, you are cut out for the life of a poitician!

 “Good work costs much more than poor imitation or factory product” Charles Greene
CaliforniaRemodelingContractor.com

(post #107427, reply #3 of 14)

I'd fill that gap with a preprimed pine cut snug to the jamb (like an extension jamb) then mud the whole corner with durabond.  After it's sanded and painted, it will have the cheezy drywall return "look" they are after.

(post #107427, reply #4 of 14)

Assuming your DW is not already installed:


Apply DW right over the window; cut window out with RotoZip this will produce about a 1/4" gap between the window and DW edge.


Apply vinyl Zip strip with staples and / or spray adhesive - tight against edge of wood; finish DW; zip off the Zip strip and paint.


Voila, no gap and clean edges!


Around here everyone, including the DW supply houses, calls this product Zip strip - not sure if that is the "correct" name.  It is a vinyl DW trim, comes in 10' lengths, viewed from the end it is shaped like a T.


The long part of the T is perforated and is installed against the face of the DW, the crossbar part of the T is pressed into contact with the wood of the window, one side of the T crossbar fits in the gap between DW and wood and covers the edge of the DW, the other side of the T crossbar provides a shoulder for the DW knife to ride and is ultimately "zipped off" - in reality it tears off once you get it started at an end.


Closer inspection will show that one side of the T crossbar has a shoulder, the other side does not.  The side with the shoulder is the side which faces the room.


Jim


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.
Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #107427, reply #6 of 14)

And in NW OH-called tearaway "L" bead.


regional dialect.


A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



http://www.quittintime.com/


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #107427, reply #11 of 14)

That's the stuff!


Jim


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.
Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #107427, reply #5 of 14)

Lots of ways, but I question why they want to pay extra to get the cheaper looking job.

You can use mud and tape right up to it.

You can use J-metal as you hang the SR, and then finish.
I think I would use a no-coat corner and wrap it right into the wood jamb. That is the fastest and quickest I can think of.

 

 


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(post #107427, reply #12 of 14)

Check out this web site.  All kinds of dw trim.


http://www.trim-tex.com/j&lbeads.htm


Good luck!