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Finish/Trim for inside arch window

ChuckD's picture

I have an arch window on gable wall of my upstairs garage apartment.  The window is recessed about 4" from the finished interior wall.  The diameter of the window is about 6'.  I had planned on finishing this with either bendable drywall or by cutting kerfs in some playwood and then making some arch trim.  I do not have access to any bendable drywall and would like to avoid cutting the kerfs and then having to make an arched trim to match. 


Is there anyway that I can bend regular drywall or does anyone have any other great ideas for finishing and trimming this window.


Thanks,


chuck

(post #99894, reply #1 of 25)

Chuck,  A friend from here and I were just typing about this last nite.  We were talking thick walls.  I suggested a finish I did at my place.  I flaired the returns from the window frame at a 45, then straight out to the wall plane.  This makes the window "bigger" and allows more sight line from the side.  Perfect for passive solar.  At any rate, this also created some nice shadow lines.  On the second floor I did the same only this time there's arch top windows above the dbl casement.  This I only flaired at a 45.  I hung the board over the opening where the archtop was.  Fixed a large scribe to the joint of the center of the dbl casement and the archtop to mark out the larger half circle.  Cut the drywall out to that scribe and then framed the fill behind the drywall.  We used lath mesh to line the flaired arch return.  Mudded that up and taped the flair to flat plane with fibreglas.  Looks good I think and whats comical, no wood casing in a carpenters house.  All drywall returns.

A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #2 of 25)

You can't get 1/4" drywall by you.?

(post #99894, reply #4 of 25)

Probably, I don't have any contacts at the commercial supply places.  I usually shop for drywall at lowes and they don't carry it.  I was trying to avoid going to a supply house, setting up an account etc.   Plus I only need to finish one window.  If I can do it somehow without the 1/4 then I will.  Both of the ideas floated so far sound feasible.  I think I will try the metal lathe and mud.


 


chuck

(post #99894, reply #3 of 25)

The trick is to dampen regular drywall...support the 2 ends (clamp a rope on each end) and moisten several times until it starts to sag under its own weight. keep it wet enough that it'll reach the radius you want. I would let it dry a bit, too, otherwise you've lots of curved crumbly bits.

All the best...


To those who know - this may be obvious. To those who don't - I hope I've helped.


 

 

(post #99894, reply #5 of 25)

Personally, I'd order the window with a jamb extension.  Since we are past that now, bend drywall by wetting as described above.  It would really be much better if you could get 1/4" drywall and go with 2 layers.  The backup framing has to be filled in pretty well too.  You can get 1/4" drywall at a drywall supplier - look in the phone book.   You are going to need the flex corner bead so you will have to go to a drywall store anyway...


If you want to use plywood a real building supply will be able to get you 3/8" bendable plywood - it's about $25 a sheet.   Multi-ply underlayment bends pretty easily too.  Scoring plywood produces mixed results at best.  If you still want to try to score it, interior plywood bends easier than exterior ply and it will bend easier on the 4' dimension.  Score it every 2".  2 layers of 3/8" would probably be best.


One variable you didn't mention is is it a 1/2 circle arch or a elliptical arch?  If it is an elliptical arch, there is no way to get away without going to buy something special.


Re the trim, go to a building supply and buy flex trim.  It is probably going to be about $50.  Assuming you want a regular casing profile, making something would be the best method for people who's time is not worth much.

Matt

(post #99894, reply #6 of 25)

Myron Ferguson wrote an article in FH about drywall arches. Aside from flex bead and 1/4", he also mentions scoring the back of 1/2 or 3/8 rock every 2" to give it the bend. I personally don't like the idea of wetting the drywall at all, I just see mold a-coming. Not that I've ever seen mold as a result, just a paranoia. I liked the idea of flaring the return, that must look sweet. Post a pic if you got it.

(post #99894, reply #11 of 25)

Here you go, arched windows are standard jamb thickness in a 2x6 wall, with 1'' dowbd and 3/4'' furring exterior.


Squared windows in a 10''+ wall.  Flared to let in the light, solar and to allow more viewage from the side.


A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


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(post #99894, reply #13 of 25)

Sharp. That looks really nice. I think it would look really nice on one of those great room walls that's open to above where you use 2x8s or 2x10 as wall framing. Great detail. Thanks for the pictures.

(post #99894, reply #14 of 25)

You've been here?

A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #17 of 25)

Is that drywall return, no casing look pretty popular there in the mid-west?

Matt

(post #99894, reply #18 of 25)

It was popular in the 30's with usually a marble sill.


It regained some popularity in the 60/70's in some track homes.


All the examples I've run into were in conjuction with metal windows.


After working full time and building it on nites and weekends for a year and a half, it just was.


Carpenter with no window casing, I should be shot.


A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #19 of 25)

On some less expensive houses, to save money, I'll have the jambs wrapped with sheetrock, and then case the windows out - looks OK.

Matt

(post #99894, reply #20 of 25)

Hey cal, from what Joyce said, those windows were a hell of a lot harder to return than you're lettin' on, eh? They are just one of the many strange features in your house...you're a little more than just a carpenter<G>...

I had been meaning to ask you about 'em...procrastination pays off once again, ha!

Hey, pocket doors can't come off the track if they're nailed open

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #99894, reply #21 of 25)

Well Holly, Matt uses 'em in some less expensive homes so I guess I done alright. 


And you're right on that "more than just a carpenter"  I'm a pretty good bull #### artist too.


A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #22 of 25)

I was once told that in Hawaii they use almost no interior trim.  They think it looks cluttered.  They want the clean look...

Matt

(post #99894, reply #23 of 25)

Cool, cheaper home.........less cluttered.  I do try to fit the mold.

A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #24 of 25)

cal, doode, you're a pretty good mud slinger, too, for such a cheap bastige<G>

Hey, pocket doors can't come off the track if they're nailed open

www.tvwsolar.com

The Village Woodworks, Inc

Chapel Hill, NC

 

We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

(post #99894, reply #25 of 25)

I'd like to thank all the ...........


thank you,


Thank you very much.


A great place for Information, Comraderie, and a sucker punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time


 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #99894, reply #15 of 25)

It's an elliptical arch.  I wish I could have gotten the window with extensions and trim, but I pick the window up out of the boneyard of a local supplier.  I think I paid $25 for it.  I think what I will do is the 1/4 ply topped with the 1/4 drywall.  I did find it at loews, just never looked for it before.  I was thinking for theexterior trim if  I do it, was ripping 3/4 oak into 1/2 inch strips and then bending them individually on a form and then gluing them back together.  What do you think about that. 


 


cd

(post #99894, reply #16 of 25)

Sounds like you have a plan....


Re the exterior trim, I'm not sure that Oak would be a good choice unless you really want to go with Stained and poly look.   Even then, I'm not sure how rot resistant oak is - never used it for an exterior application.  To bend even thin strips of oak in an elliptical arch, you would have to wet it.  If you intend to paint the ext trim, I'd go with some kind of synthetic.  Again, they sell flex trim that could be used depending on the profile (look) you want.  Or, if you want to bend something for a 1x4 look Azek (sp?) is a cellular PVC product that bends very nicely when heated.  Or you might be able to do the same deal where you cut it in thin strips and bend and glue - use the Azek glue though.  IN thin strips (say 1/2" it would likely not need to be heated.  Be prepared, Azek is pricey - say about maybe $16 for a 1x4 - 18' would be a guess and it only comes in the 18' lengths.  It comes in full 1" thick stock too.  A similar product is Koma (sp) although I have never used it - just read about it here.  I can also order Azek bent to my profile from my lumber yard. 


A third exterior trim idea would be to cut some 1x12 and glue it up, and then cut out your ellipse with a jig saw and then rout to a profile if desired.  See attached pic.


 

Matt

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(post #99894, reply #7 of 25)

Wetting 1/4" drywall would be the cheapest way to go.


Personally, I would order flexible moulding, and jamb extensions.  www.trimster.com will ship directly to you.


Ripping the jamb material is the only PITA, I usually secure it flat on a piece of 1x and rip it with a circular saw.


 


Stacy's mom has got it going on.

It's not too late, it's never too late.

(post #99894, reply #9 of 25)

Dustin,


      I agree flex moulding works! Its super quick and looks good. I am not a finish carpenter but have installed with ease. I was just careful not to cut to short with the radius. Cut long and then trim a little at a time.

(post #99894, reply #8 of 25)

First,install 1/4' plywood for a base. Then you can use drywall over it. The plywood bends easier and helps take out flat spots in the rock. 3/8" drywall will bend to 3'-0" radius without wetting or cracking if you use the 1/4" plywood first.Cut the plywood across the 4'-0" dimension and it will bend even easier.


 


mike

(post #99894, reply #10 of 25)

Do a search on "Rubberwood"


Not kidding it is a real product ........


 


On a hill by the harbour

 

On a hill by the harbour

(post #99894, reply #12 of 25)

Even Lowes will probably special order a sheet of 1/4".  Drywall supply outfits are where I usually go for 1/4" and the few that I've used never required that I open an account for one sheet, although the price is higher. 


:-)  

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.