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Flashing for Round Chimney Pipe

carloa007's picture

Two questions. What is the correct name of the flashing plate used for round metal chimney pipes at the roof intersection?


Where do you typically get them?


Looking at doing a roof for a friend. He has a wood stove that penetrates the roof with round metal chimney pipe.

(post #108616, reply #1 of 21)

Roof jack is one word I heard them called, the storm collar goes above it. Lowes or other stores usually have them. Some are specific to the brand of pipe, but not normally an issue.


They are for "any" pitch and can be a sloppy fit/look on some installs.


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(post #108616, reply #8 of 21)

"They are for "any" pitch"

Actually there are two 'universal' type jacks. One works up to about 6/12 or 8/12, and the other is for much steeper pitches, tho I would prefer a custom one form a sheet metal shop for steeper pitches and for low slope roofs.

 

 


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(post #108616, reply #11 of 21)

>>Lowes or other stores usually have them.

Be sure it's rated for use on wood stove flues - around here the big boxes don't stock that product





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(post #108616, reply #12 of 21)

I'm in sothern ohio and both menards and lowes stock them and the pipe.


You being north i would think they did they are seasonal at lowes though.

(post #108616, reply #14 of 21)

Lowes stocks the basics here as well.

http://www.quittintime.com/           

(post #108616, reply #13 of 21)

Funny. My Stainless Steel flue and the parts are all available at our Lowes.  I didn't use a jack tho' on mine, I have a copper chase cover with a collar.


Speaking of which, I just got Grant's boomlift here at my house for a few days, gonna be sticking my stone on that chimny chase, finally.  Yee haaa, progress resumes.


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


"If Brains was lard, you couldn't grease much of a pan"
Jed Clampitt



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #108616, reply #2 of 21)

I get mine from a sheetmetal shop.

They can be fabricated to any roof pitch and diameter.

In your case I would have a roof jack fabricated and make it 1" larger than the diameter of the pipe and install it as part of the new roof.

Chuck S

live, work, build, ...better with wood
live, work, build, ...better with wood

(post #108616, reply #4 of 21)

Yea what they said.


I have a woodstove and fireplace store and they usually come to fit the particular name brand of pipe but usually no big deal. so you could do as either duane or chuck already said but if you go to buy one they usually come for 0 to 6/12 pitch or 7 to 12/12 pitch.

(post #108616, reply #5 of 21)

Plumbing supply stores sell the roof jacks in several different pitches. Make sure the jack is galvanized steel .If they do not know what the application is for they may give you a plastic one.I sent a young fellow to pick up 3 jacks ,one was for a plumbing stack and the other two were for B-vent pipe. He came back with three plastic ones.My fault for not writing a note of exactly what I needed.


mike

(post #108616, reply #9 of 21)

since this is for a larger A-flue, I doubt he'd find a plastic or rubber one for it.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #108616, reply #6 of 21)

Never heard it called a roof jack; up here a 'roof jack' is the bracket gizmo you nail onto the roof to hold up the planks you stand on while shingling or whatever.


We just call it a chimney flashing; as Sphere said, the big-boxes stock them in 0-6:12 or 6-12:12 pitch. I have also seen some which feature slip joints and are called 'adjustable' or 'universal'. There are numbers stamped on the base plate; you rotate the cone until the arrow on it points at the number for the rise of your roof. These will sometimes have an octagonal base plate so they can be set in different orientations. They work, but the slip joints can be subject to leaking.


Over 12:12 you usually need to custom order.


This flashing doesn't fit the outside of the chimney tight; it has to slide over the pipe so there's usually a bit of loose (no more than a quarter inch total). You use HT silicone to seal that joint, then add a storm collar (a separate piece of metal) above it, screw it down nice and tight, and silicone that joint, too. Do it right, and rain won't slide down the pipe.


You want a really nice flashing, call Grant.



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Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #108616, reply #7 of 21)

Sounds good. Thx guys...

(post #108616, reply #10 of 21)

 "screw it down nice and tight, and silicone that joint, too. Do it right, and rain won't slide down the pipe."


And you can enjoy a carefree sleep until the local family of ravens see their reflection in the steel chimney pipe and decide it is an interloper, tearing out all the caulking (and it's replacement) each morning at six am.

(post #108616, reply #15 of 21)

local family of ravens see their reflection in the steel chimney pipe and decide it is an interloper, tearing out all the caulking


Paint the pipe flat black with HT stove paint. Or paste a picture of Kate Smith to it....



Dinosaur


How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....


Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #108616, reply #16 of 21)

http://www.zoobler.com/product.php?sku=9449&m=Duratech&b=Simpson&c=Wood+(Rigid)

I put in one of these last year. As someone else mentioned it has about a 1" clearance around the pipe which is covered by a storm collar. The clearance I think is for air space to cool the flue during a chimney fire, but you'd have to check the instructions for the chimney system to be sure.

(post #108616, reply #17 of 21)

You are partially correct about the clearance: Some brands of pipe (typically triple wall) require some "breathing room". The boot you have linked to is for a specific brand and is not typical. The boot is somewhat structural in most applications, keeping the chimney from swaying against wind load.


The storm collar is named after it's main function: keeping the water out of the assembly.


http://www.quittintime.com/           

(post #108616, reply #18 of 21)

to my mind, if he had an inch all the way around on the boot, he had the wrong size boot

Welcome to the
Taunton University of Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
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Edited 7/17/2009 7:26 am ET by Piffin

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #108616, reply #19 of 21)

Yeah - I think Duravent may be the only manuf. (that I ever dealt with) that requires the air movement and they've now built that into their boots as show by the link.

http://www.quittintime.com/           

(post #108616, reply #20 of 21)

Betcha got some wet footers this AM.

Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


"If Brains was lard, you couldn't grease much of a pan"
Jed Clampitt



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #108616, reply #21 of 21)

Yes, YMMV from one manufacturer to another -- that link is just an example. In my case the 1" clearance was enforced by standoffs bent into the lip (last year's model).

This mfr. also requires bracing if it goes a certain distance above the roof, and a separate snow guard.