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Garage shed/door materials/construction?

oh_gee_duffer's picture

I have an old pair of hinged swing-out garage doors to replace here in the Bay Area. As the pic shows, it's at the bottom of a steeply slopped driveway that gets moisture fairly often. The client wants a replica. It's v-groove t&g 1x6 painted, probably Doug Fir. It's held up fairly well over the years, but rotted out at the bottom. Question: Can/should this be replicated with the same materials? The old stuff (Vert Grain) is much better than I might be able to get a hold of now. Can I substitute with, say, and an ash back-frame using some type of modern composite for the v-siding? What's the best way to curb warping here? Thanks

Looks to be painted.  Saw (post #188021, reply #1 of 7)

Looks to be painted. 

Saw off the rotten bottom,  route a dovetail lengthwise in the existing door.

Pick out some clear PT DF, mill to match the existing, dovetail onto the existing, epoxy fill  the joint.

Repaint.

Looks to be painted.  Saw (post #188021, reply #2 of 7)

Looks to be painted. 

Saw off the rotten bottom,  route a dovetail lengthwise in the existing door.

Pick out some clear PT DF, mill to match the existing, dovetail onto the existing, epoxy fill  the joint.

Repaint.

It's painted (post #188021, reply #3 of 7)

Oh Boy, That's a lot of work! They're simple doors that I could build pretty fast I think. The client just wants a new door that's relatively  dimensionally stable. I don't trust PT not to warp because of it's moisture content, the Epoxy sounds like a good idea!

How do you post two places at (post #188021, reply #4 of 7)

How do you post two places at once??


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

To keep the door from (post #188021, reply #5 of 7)

To keep the door from warping, skin both sides. Instead of using  T&G material, consider using sheets of T-11. It has the same vertical style pattern, yet as a complete sheet, keeps water from infiltrating as it normally can when using T&G.  If skinned on both sides, the door will not rack. The frame can simply be white pine, although Doug Fir would be my first choice if I had access to it. Mounting some other T&G species of wood to an ash frame and leaving the frame exposed allows the frame to move differently than the door skin material....which will lead to racking, so I would stay away from using an ash frame and skinning only one side of the door.

Good coats of oil base enamel paint will seal it up and it will last a very long time. I have built large quantities of utility doors when working as a mill carpenter. We simply planed down white pine 2X6s to 1-1/4 thick, and then skinned both sides using 1/4 inch thick luan. We painted 2 coats of oil base on both sides and then hung the doors using "T" strap hinges. Many of these doors are over 15 years old, and still working fine today.

Dan, I'm not sure that I (post #188021, reply #7 of 7)

Dan,

I'm not sure that I agree with your suggestion of T 1-11. It will help solve the racking problem, but everywhere I've seen T1-11 used, it has deteriorated at the bottom. Keeping it thoroughly sealed & painted would help, but doubt that anyone is going to remove garage doors periodically to refinish the bottoms. In a place that gets wet frequently, I don't think that siding would be a practical solution.

Ed

Thta depends on your concept. (post #188021, reply #6 of 7)

Thta depends on your concept. Mine is mostly wooden ones. arizona mobile homes for sale