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How Long to Drywall

Legacy's picture

How long would a competent crew take to hang & mud drywall in 4
large rooms no closets or cut up sections. 4 straight walls 70 4 x 8 sheets. 88" ceiling height.

Current crew seems to be taking forever.

Comments would be helpfull.

Thanks

Crew of three should be able (post #182136, reply #1 of 16)

Crew of three should be able to hang that easily in a day.

Finishing... Depends on what level you're going to. The crews around here couldn't do a smooth finish to save their lives, so they'd have a level 3 on there in another two days, with drying time included.

__________________________________________________ I have CDO. It's like OCD, only the letters are in alphabetical order like they're supposed to be. http://www.truenorthcarpentry.net

Day? Is that a 24 hour day? (post #182136, reply #5 of 16)

Day? Is that a 24 hour day? You on that crew?

Jim

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

LOL, yep, I'd be on the crew, (post #182136, reply #7 of 16)

LOL, yep, I'd be on the crew, slowing it down.

Think about it: 8 hour day, 480 minutes, divided by 70 sheets is 6.85 minutes a sheet. 3 guys would each have to hang a sheet every 20 minutes for a day.

That would be working as three separate guys. Now put together three guys who really work together well. If the drywall is stocked, 5 or 6 hours is quite doable.

*Edit*

Failed to notice the 88" walls. That would slow a crew down some, but still a day.

__________________________________________________ I have CDO. It's like OCD, only the letters are in alphabetical order like they're supposed to be. http://www.truenorthcarpentry.net

I had part of a drywall (post #182136, reply #2 of 16)

I had part of a drywall mudding crew show up and start farting around on my house and I threw them off the job. Did the drywall finishing myself. I figured the drywall sub owner was out of control of his crew.

______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ There are three kinds of men: The one that learns by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

Legacy: Around 4 days. 1/2 - (post #182136, reply #3 of 16)

Legacy:

Around 4 days. 1/2 - 1 to hang - depending on how many guys, at least 3 to finish, and 1/2 to sand. The mud can only dry so fast. Also, this is assuming that the area is heated. The final mud coat has to dry pretty close to a full day before the sanding takes place. On the days they are finishing, they may not be working full days - again, the mud only dries so fast.

Matt

I always think I can hang (post #182136, reply #4 of 16)

I always think I can hang more drywall in a day than I really can. If the crew of 3 works for 8 hours and takes no lunch break they'd have to consistently hang each sheet in 7 minutes. As a GC, I think a more realistic timeframe would be 2 days to hang. If they use a setting compound for the first coat then they could get two coats of mud done on day 3. Third coat on day 4. Sand and texture ceiling (if applicable)on day five.

Chuck

Matt and Ckorto have it about (post #182136, reply #6 of 16)

Matt and Ckorto have it about right - 4 or 5 days to be paint ready.

Yes, there are some crews that are faster but they need to have been together for a long time.

88" ceiling? How did that happen - existing?

That automatically slows them down - they have to rip every bottom sheet.... a case of less sq.ft. taking more time.

Jim

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

I agree w/ other posters. One (post #182136, reply #8 of 16)

I agree w/ other posters. One day for crew of three to hang it. Maybe a crew of 2 to first coat the mud (maybe 5 hours if they are worth their salt), wait a day, crew of one maybe to sand/prep and second coat it for 5-7 hours. Final coat should be 1/2 day. Then crew of two to texture for say 4-5 hrs. Add say 20% for contingency, clean up, mobilizing. Due to the day of drying between most coats, it would take 4 days time to do it. Why large rooms and only 8ft sheets? That slows things down a lot. Also agree, a little slower w/ the short ceilings.

2 guys should have the whole thing done in a week easy.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

Thanks guys I can now go back (post #182136, reply #9 of 16)

Thanks guys

I can now go back to these guys and show them in writing that
I not blowing smoke up their collective ?#*^

It sounds like you have a (post #182136, reply #12 of 16)

It sounds like you have a confrontational relationship with your drywallers. Showing them a bunch of posts from "experts" on the internet justs ups the ante.

I put "experts" in quotes because your drywallers have no idea who these people are, even if you (and I) have confidence that they know what they're talking about.

Having said that, by the time you felt they were taking too long and then posted about it here... then waiting a few days for responses... and then printing it out to show them AND THEY'RE STILL NOT DONE, well yeah, it sounds like they're taking too long by any measure.

Maybe you should just fire them. Either that, or ask them what you can do to help them finish sooner. But don't antagonize them.

Clewless: You said: >> I (post #182136, reply #10 of 16)

Clewless:
You said:
>> I agree w/ other posters. One day for crew of three to hang it. Maybe a crew of 2 to first coat the mud (maybe 5 hours if they are worth their salt), wait a day, crew of one maybe to sand/prep and second coat it for 5-7 hours. Final coat should be 1/2 day. <<

Professional drywallers don't sand between coats. Or at least I've never seen it....

Matt

Well maybe not sand, truly, (post #182136, reply #15 of 16)

Well maybe not sand, truly, but prep it. Some use a sponge. Some sanding is probably always necessary, but good drywallers will sand only minimally. My mudding? I sand like the devil!!

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

When my basement got done (post #182136, reply #11 of 16)

When my basement got done (~1200 SqFt with 8.75' ceilings), the crew of five hung the rock in 4 hours, and this included the ceiling. The crew that flung the mud were here twice, first time about 7-8 hours for base, and the second time about 4-5 hours for finish coat. The one-guy sander spent about 4-hours. So, about 60 man hours. That was something like 90 54" wide sheets.

Their workmanship is (post #182136, reply #13 of 16)

Their workmanship is excellent and they are decent helpful guys who always pitch in to help out.

I do everything I can to help them work quicker, even bring them sandwiches from home & coffee so they don't have to go out for lunch.

They are always crying about not making any money. I am trying to get my job done quicker plus help them become more succesfull
but I can't seem to get them to connect all the dots. I can't get them to see past the old established habits.

Almost all of the DW (post #182136, reply #14 of 16)

Almost all of the DW contractors I've used have been in on piece work, as long as their schedule didn't interfere with my timeline and the work was professionally done then I didn't give a crap how long they took. They were motivated by the piece work mentality so they were in and out as quickly as they could.

What exactly do they need to pitch in and help out with, are you diverting their time away from hanging and finishing drywall? Is your help actually costing them additional time?

If they are holding up your job and it's critical then let them know. Get their input on a realistic time frame and hold them to it within reason, let the job get done, pay them and get on with the rest of your project.

I tend to agree with DonCanDo (post #182136, reply #16 of 16)

I tend to agree with DonCanDo about antagonizing them. Using this information to take some action is one thing. Rubbing it in their face is another. Remember, we are relying in part on the accuracy of your description of the on-site conditions; we could easily change our minds if we actually saw it.

But given reasonable accuracy, you do have fuel to fire them or see what's up. On the other hand, if they bid it, then maybe it doesn't make any difference. If it is hourly ... then probably ask them to leave and get another crew.

But ... you still need to handle it respectfully. If they aren't getting paid the going rate, their speed may not be warranted.

I had ONE guy hang (only) my 5 level house w/ vaulted ceilings. He took a long time ... it may have been a month and a half. But given his work, I wouldn't have had it any other way ... he was the best. My drywall was bid, so it didn't make any difference. I was picking up loose ends trying to stay ahead of him and not always being successful, so it worked out.

I often found out that delays always seem to have some purpose and everything worked out. I always picked up other loose ends during the 'down time'. Patience grasshopper.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!