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Linoleum seam, how to reseal it?

Hudson Valley Carpenter's picture

Got a call from a friendly client today.  He has commercial linoleum in his store and a seam has lifted due to a water spill.  I'd like to help him out but I want to be sure that it stays down.   I'd appreciate advice about technique and adhesives.  

(post #103971, reply #1 of 5)

If it is sheet vinyl, they sell seam sealer that welds the seams together.  or fuses them.  Or sumptin' like dat.

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson


"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson

"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

(post #103971, reply #2 of 5)

Yes, it's commercial sheet goods, Armstrong he said.  The seam sealer is good for after, thanks.  


But the first challenge is to get the seam to lay down and stay down.  Anyone done this successfully? 

(post #103971, reply #3 of 5)

First reglue the area as far as you can get under the seam then heat the area up with a hair dryer or a heat gun be really careful not to scorch it when it is soft press it into the glueand put something flat and heavy on to the seam untill it cools fully.  Let it set up over night if you can then hit it with the sealer.  It will never look perfect so don't promise it will.  If you are having trouble getting the adhesive under try a large irrigation syringe you can cut the latex adhesive with water if you have to, to get it out of the syringe.  Make sure to have some rags and mineral sperits around to clean up it gets messy.  Be careful once you touch it they generally expect you to fix it, not leave a mess and a bill, so if you can't make it better sometimes you just need to walk away.

(post #103971, reply #4 of 5)

HVC,


 I have a good friend that does flooring for a living and I have seen some things he has fixed and you cannot tell where the split was.


 I would find a good floor guy and pay him to do the job right. They have all the correct tools and materials.  If you try it and mess it up, it will be all the harder for them to fix it.


Just my opinion,


Bill Koustenis


Advanced Automotive Machine


Waldorf Md

Bill Koustenis Advanced Automotive Machine Waldorf Md

(post #103971, reply #5 of 5)

Thanks to both of you for your advice.  Of course I'd like to call someone who's a real pro at this but that's the problem.  The best guy around retired and moved away, just last winter so...I'm left to give it a try. 


After reading your answers I think I'll try lifting the seam a bit, cleaning the underlayment carefully and then regluing it without using heat, just a 2X and a couple of cement blocks or similar weights, for a couple of days.  That way, if it doesn't take, I can exit gracefully without screwing it up for the next guy.