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repairs stairs - should I get pre-made risers? Tile?

netrate's picture
I have just finished taking the carpet and the tiles from the stairs. I was going to get some GLUE REMOVER, but I am not sure if it is worth it. I was looking at Lowes, where they have oak risers on sale for $19.99 (just oak veneer with particle board). But I am not sure how I want to approach it. I would love to just remove the paint and sand down the cedar and paint it white, but I know it won't last. I am putting laminate flooring at the bottom of the stairs, but I am not a big fan of using laminate flooring for the stairs and riser. So I am at a bit of a standstill - I haven't ruled out carpeting yet. 1) Should I bother removing the glue? 2) What do most people do with stairs? 3) Is it going to be too expensive to get some maple or oak and redo the stairs myself? Thank you in advance.

David amateur

I just redid my stairs. (post #208067, reply #1 of 11)

I used oak nosings, glazed tile risers, and saltillo treads. It sounds like your risers are a little expensive for what you get. Treads and risers get alot of wear and tear. Solid wood is much better.

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you did a very nice job (post #208067, reply #2 of 11)

you did a very nice job there. What are Satillo treads?

David amateur

saltillo (post #208067, reply #3 of 11)

Saltillo tiles are an unglazed uncolored clay floor tile made in Mexico. You've probably seen them even if you don't know the name. They used to be hand made and air dried. They were quite variable in thickness. Because they were air dried outdoors they often came with animal tracks in them. Now they seem to be machine made, uniform thickness and with fake animal tracks. They are now much less interesting than before.

Keep in mind that anything (post #208067, reply #4 of 11)

Keep in mind that anything you put on top of the treads will effectively raise the entire stair, making the bottom step long and the top step short.

And looking at those stairs the stringers are no great shakes either.  (Were they carpeted too?)

I'd say either replace the entire stairway or just install more carpet.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

thank you for the comments, (post #208067, reply #6 of 11)

thank you for the comments, it makes sense now. I am not sure what stringers are and yes there was carpeting over top of the tiles. Getting rid of both carpet and tiles. Should I buy some Glue stripper for all the leftover epoxy and glue on the stairs?

David amateur

Rather than Lowes or HD, try (post #208067, reply #5 of 11)

Rather than Lowes or HD, try looking for a hardwood supplier in your area - often they have better material at lower prices.   For stair risers you may find a place that has scraps long enough at a lower price than normal.  Stair height is the key to what path to take on the treads.  Your first and top height should be fairly close - often covering existing stairs is a losing proposition except for the thinnest of materials.

While many projects are ok to not follow the best practice, stairs are the most likely place in a home that someone will be injured and uneven heights are hazardous.   Just today I was looking at a set of stairs that will be replaced tomorrow and I tripped walking up them for just that reason and I knew and anticipated the uneven risers!  lol

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

I think I am going to try the (post #208067, reply #7 of 11)

I think I am going to try the 1/4 inch oak veneer for the tread and riser, it is about $24.00 a sheet for 4 X 8 so I am not really out that much when all is said and done. But the challenge is going to be the nose. I was researching and someone suggested a 1/4 round of oak for the nose, but finding one that is 1/4 thick will be the real question. So I think the nose is the sticking point on this one. Any suggestions?

David amateur

The nosing needs to be very (post #208067, reply #8 of 11)

The nosing needs to be very securely attached, since it's subjected to enormous stess.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

David (post #208067, reply #9 of 11)

if by 1/4" oak veneer, you mean 1/4" oak plywood-the veneer is paper thin.  Won't last a minute-and if you were to sand it b/4 staining..............you'd be left with little or no oak veneer.

There are tread covers that might be just what you want.  Thinner solid wood that slip right over your existing treads.  Complete with nosings.  Prefinished or unstained.

Won't be 24.00 though.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Yes it is the 1/4 veneer (post #208067, reply #10 of 11)

Yes it is the 1/4 veneer oak/plywood deal.  I was going to clear coat first and then paint it.  Not the way to go?  The reason I only want cheap is because I am going to paint it white anyway.

David amateur

Well, if you are painting it, (post #208067, reply #11 of 11)

Well, if you are painting it, why not just get white vinyl tiles, or white vinyl sheet goods?