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Rough Sawn Pine Interior & Finish???

PedroTheMule's picture

Hello to ALL and frenchy this ought to be right up your alley.......


Still planning another part of our retirement home....if I do enough of this; all of you will know what the house looks like even before it's actually built!


Finally found a place where the interior was finished in rough sawn knotty pine....about 10" planks.....gorgeous...took the DW by and she stopped dead in her tracks.....said that's exactly what she's always wanted......ahhhh easy decision.


So, this place simply left the planks/panels as is and it smelled terrific but I'm wondering if I should put a thin coat of something on it to minimize food odors and such over the next 50 years.......maybe spray a thin film of shellac on it or something? I'm planning for proper ventilation just wondering if anybody ever does anything on the interior or if I should simply leave it alone. I will use it on "every" outer wall of the interior and trim, den, bedrooms, bath, kitchen etc......not yet sure if inner walls will be drywall finish or more lumber (all walls will be backed with drywall for fire safety.


Open to any ideas.


Pedro the Mule - Now my den will look like my little cart

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #1 of 40)

At the risk of being labeled again <grin> one of the easiest finishes to put on is shellac.  (indoors right?) Shellac does several things well one of them is color retention..There is a UV inhibitor in even the blondest of shellacs and that helps hold the color that the planks are now..


 Shellac will darken somewhat the color but really make the grain and vividness pop! right out. Shellac is also an in expensive finish and if you change your moind later and wish to put another finish over the shellac shellac makes a wonderful primer coat. Plus if someone decides later that they really did like the wood look after all you won't have the color stuck in the grain making it nearly impossible to get out..  Paint stripper will remove the paint, denatured alcohol will clear the shellac off and you can start right over!


 I'll be glad to help you shellac things in a way that will result in no runs and a nice even durable finish. Just ask and I'll list the steps.


 By the way shellac is really safe,  far safer than most other finishes with regard to fumes etc..

(post #108770, reply #6 of 40)

Yea frenchy,


I'll read a books worth if ya got the info handy. Even if I don't use the info on the next house.....I'm sure I'll use it elsewhere.....actually I'll probably at least shellac the floor, just not sure about the walls....jury's still out on that one.


Pedro the Mule - Up one wall down the other

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #2 of 40)

I put 4 coats of minwax spar varnish, first one thinned by 1/3.  But its planed and slick.

(post #108770, reply #3 of 40)

Catfish. 


   Spar varnish is OK too but it's a lot more expensive.. Plus it doesn't have the other advantages of shellac, safe, fast drying, lack of the plastic look. ease of repair, etc..


 Spar Varnish is the only suitable finish when you want to show the wood outdoors though. I don't think much of Minwax Not very durable.. Epiphanes is the best varnish bar none.. (ask the boat guys)  But wow is it expensive..


Edited 8/15/2009 7:02 pm ET by frenchy

(post #108770, reply #9 of 40)

I pay 10 a gallon.

(post #108770, reply #11 of 40)

$10 a gallon?  wow! that's about $35.00 cheaper than what I pay, what's your secret?

(post #108770, reply #13 of 40)

11$ here...


looks yur being taken fer a ride...


 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!



Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!


 



"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"
"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #108770, reply #15 of 40)

The salesman doesn't want to say no.

(post #108770, reply #5 of 40)

Yo catfish,


By chance are ya still in it?......Do you have a million hi res pics....my DW has no clue what you've done would look like.....now me......I see a tree in a forest 300 yds out and I know exactly what it'll look like when it's done. I can describe all day long to her but no go......


Pedro the Mule - Wood walls to match my head


 


If ya got pics....... gracefax@hotmail.com

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #10 of 40)

It'll be sometime tomorrow, but yes I'll send or post here.

(post #108770, reply #4 of 40)

I grew up in a house in Norway with pine panelling.  The house was built in 1939, and the panelling was never finished with anything.  No there were no odors to speak of, but the panelling didn't extend into the kitchen.  It was in every other room, though.  Walls and ceilings.  And we used to burn wood in a stove on the first floor.  It was planed to a smooth finish, so that may have made a difference. 

(post #108770, reply #7 of 40)

Hi FingerJoint,


I am expecting the wood to breath but as you mentioned the smooth finish may hold back some but gosh after all those years I expect it would have been a problem if it ever was.


Pedro the Mule - Maybe if I slick my fur I wouldn't smell so bad....maybe Dapper Dan's

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #8 of 40)

While we're at it......Expecting to do the floor in pine too....would you do all interior walls too?......


Considering.....


Wood floors


Wood on the inside of the exterior walls


Maybe drywall on the inside interior walls so I could paint it and add a little contrast with color


Wood Ceilings


For the walls I had planned on horizontal but would you do some verticle too.....if so where and why.


Interested in all input and Thanks,


Pedro the Mule - It's the last house and I want it right


 


      Pedro the Mule -   


  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #12 of 40)

We've got milled (not RS) pine ceilings, RS fir rafters, and hand peeled WRC logs in our house. Haven't put anything on them at all. No problems to report.

I'd be careful with a finish; once you've started you're committed. Test a small area first to make sure you like it.

Lots of people asked us about interior finishes...about "greasy finger prints" and the like. This just didn't materialize. We stuck with natural unfinished wood, and so far are happy.

I can send pics if it would help.

Scott.

(post #108770, reply #18 of 40)

Hi Scott,


We've got milled (not RS) pine ceilings, RS fir rafters


Do you recall how much difference in cost for the milled vs. the rough sawn per bd. ft.?


about "greasy finger prints" and the like. This just didn't materialize


Nice to know it's not been a problem. Currently I'm tempted to go unfinished.....can always put a finish on "if" it becomes and issue. Will definitely finish the floors though.....I enjoy the ride/slide across them at high speed first thing out of bed in the morning!


I can send pics if it would help....


Send 'em on...personally I like high res pics if'n ya got 'em


Pedro the Mule - An eye for detail

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #20 of 40)

>>>Do you recall how much difference in cost for the milled vs. the rough sawn per bd. ft.?


No, the two products came from different suppliers; the pine decking it typical 2x6 T&G, not expensive. The rafters where part of an entire log/timber/installation package valued at about $14k, and I don't know the breakdown. However, as Frenchy often repeats, RS lumber is usually reasonably priced, especially if you have a saw mill in your area.


>>>Send 'em on...personally I like high res pics if'n ya got 'em


Nothing hig-res handy. Here's a pic of me working on some glass work. There are log posts and beams throughout the house, some D. Fir, some WRC.


 



Scott.


Edited 8/16/2009 12:04 pm by Scott

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(post #108770, reply #23 of 40)

I'm in love....no not you Scott.....do love your work though <grin>


That's quite impressive.


We're contemplating all rooms with simply flat 8' ceilings and the great room opening up to a 3rd floor cupola with operable awning windows but I'm not sure I can make it weather practical, still toying with the idea.....definitely doing the 3rd floor observation area, simply not sure if it'll be open below or not. I'm tinkering with the rough sketches at this point to see if I can design it in such a way as to have it open but be able to relatively easily close it in later if it proves to be too much trouble to heat.


Pedro the Mule - Love being nestled in but have wide open areas too

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #26 of 40)

The problem with unfinished wood and your idea you can always finish it later, is that when later comes around and you want to finish it, it is all dirty and grungy and how do you clean unfinished wood? Not easily.

(post #108770, reply #31 of 40)

Hi Danno,


when later comes around and you want to finish it, it is all dirty and grungy


How true.....gonna have to do a lot of contemplation on this. So far it sounds like no one has really experienced much more than dust bunnies and all of my real dirty work will take place in a detached workshop but you're right.....taking the top off my table top planer and running that thing up and down a ladder sideways.....well.....GRIN


Pedro the Mule - Splinter hooves

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #32 of 40)

>>>how do you clean unfinished wood? Not easily.

I've had good success with oxalic acid. Brush the solution on with a paint brush, scrub a bit with a scrub brush, wipe with a damp rag.

It removes the outer layer of cellulose, but not like a sander, the character of the wood is unchanged; it still looks rough sawn or hand peeled, whichever the case.

Scott.

(post #108770, reply #14 of 40)

'rough sawn' -vertical surfaces


first thing DW would say is 'how ya gonna clean those walls?'


That said, own house has 21 ea 16 ft long fir logs, average 18 inch dia), 7 of which are posts.


The posts are all polyurethane for cleaning ease (35 years old, still OK). 1st floor ceiling is 1600 sq ft of Dfior 2x6 car decking supported by the other 14  round beams, only finish is senia color in much thined linseed oil. No trouble there.


That said, if you go out of town for a week or 2, when you come back the raw wood 'fragrance', even after 30 years, is noticeable. Only other place have noticed similar is in National park cabins. <G>

(post #108770, reply #19 of 40)

Hi junkhound,


own house has 21 ea 16 ft long fir logs, average 18 inch dia), 7 of which are posts


Sweeeeet.....got any pics? I can see it from here with my minds eye....DW desperately needs pics.....


when you come back the raw wood 'fragrance'


That's the biggest reason I would like to leave it unfinished....I sometimes drop by houses under construction just to smell the fresh lumber......well actually to pick up scraps, get new ideas "and" smell it...<grin>


Pedro the Mule - New wood smells better than unbathed mule

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #16 of 40)

A bit of downer advice. I had rough sawn cedar in a room with a cathedral ceiling and the spider web accumulation was very noticeable and very difficult to clean. The accumulation included all their little bug body victims. Wouldn't have happened on a smooth slick finished surface. Of course this was on the river in Northeast Florida and your environment may not be as rich in arachnid life. Don't even talk to me about popcorn ceilings, what a mess.

(post #108770, reply #21 of 40)

Hi MGMaxwell,


rough sawn cedar in a room with a cathedral ceiling and the spider web accumulation was very noticeable and very difficult to clean


So a central vac with long extensions would be handy....


I'll be in SW Va. but I suspect this problem could happen anywhere, difference being how fast the problem accumulates.


Pedro the Mule - I hate webs more than the spiders themselves.


 


      Pedro the Mule -   


  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #35 of 40)

I have been in contact with Ben Sumner, Buckeye Branch Horselogging,Dugspur, VA,(276) 733-9187 about getting flooring milled for my house. I found him through his Craigslist ads for rough-sawn paneling that he was selling. I don't know if he's anywhere close to you, but it might be worth a call to see if he can provide the material.

Z

(post #108770, reply #36 of 40)

Thanks mackzully,


Ben Sumner, Buckeye Branch Horselogging,Dugspur, VA,(276) 733-9187


I'll make a note of it....that's definitely close to one of our properties.


Still not sure which one we're going to build on.......might even buy another and sell everything else.......who knows but I do like that area a lot and it'll be nice to have a contact.


Be sure and let me know your results working with him.


Thanks again,


Pedro the "Cheap" Mule

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #17 of 40)

ask her why she wants a place with dust bunnies and lint balls clinging to the walls?

Make sure nobody is alergic to pine in your family.

 

 


Welcome to the
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(post #108770, reply #22 of 40)

Hi Piffin,


ask her why she wants a place with dust bunnies and lint balls clinging to the walls?


Shhhhh....I want the wood and she'll be cleaning it.....shhhh.....she's already sold on it.....shhhhh


Make sure nobody is alergic to pine in your family


We're good there......thanks for the reminder, that's not always thought of huhn?


Pedro the Mule - I'll do my share of the cleaning too once retired

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

(post #108770, reply #24 of 40)

Just make sure you cook really good smelling food. G

"There are three kinds of men: The one that learns by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."
Will Rogers

______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ There are three kinds of men: The one that learns by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

(post #108770, reply #25 of 40)

Hey Pop Wheelie,

Just make sure you cook really good smelling food. G

Oh I do that but how would Monday's Garlic Curried Chicken, Tuesday's Oyster Roast & Wednesday's Apple Spice Pound Cake steeped in Chateau Morrisette Red Mountain Laurel Wine smell together?


Pedro the Mule - Oh with a hint of pine

  

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."