Search the forums

Loading

Sheathing and roofing a 12/12 pitch

Globaldiver's picture

In a couple of weeks I'll be ready to start sheathing and then roofing the 12/12 front roof of my new shop.  A 12/12 didn't sound too bad before I got the end walls tipped up 20 feet in the air....but it looks scary!


I've done a number of roofs before, but I doubt any of them over 4/12.  This roof is over BCI's (TJI's from Boise Cascade, basically).   I haven't started looking for roof jacks yet, but suspect I'll need them (I'm also going to install three skylights across the front, so this will be a little more work than just a straight sheath/roof). 


Are there any better roof jacks than another, or just whatever Home Depot sells?  Any advice on roping/harnesses/etc.?  Alternatives to roof jacks? 


The back pitch is 6/12, so I'm pretty comfortable handling that....a 45 degree angle just doesn't sound so bad until you're standing on the ground looking at it......


--Ken

(post #99142, reply #1 of 90)

My garage is 12 12 both sides.  When I sheathed the roof I started at the bottom of one side and worked up to the ridge. Then for the other side I started at the ridge and worked down to the eaves.   The last row of plywood we did from a couple of step ladders.  This system worked so well we did it at my best friends place as well.  When I was reaching down a 4 foot sheet of plywood with my air nailer  I missed a few shots but most hit the trusses.  If you don't have or have access to an air nailer get a hammer like the Stanely Fat Max or the Vaughn that has a magnetic nail holder so you can reach down with one hand.


Have a  good day


Cliffy

(post #99142, reply #2 of 90)

Thanks!  I have both a framing nailer and the Fat Max, so I shouldn't have any excuses.... --Ken

(post #99142, reply #3 of 90)

I think roof jacks are pretty much all the same. Unless you think you'll need them on other jobs and want to buy them, I think tool rental places will rent them to you. 12/12 is hard to stick to without jacks. You can try the trick of using old foam cushions (without the fabric covering) to stand on and move around the roof, but be careful!!!

(post #99142, reply #4 of 90)

I'd buy (or borrow) a bunch of toe board brackets, and use plenty of 'em. You don't want one of those slipping on you. And if you don't put them too far apart they help keep the toe boards off the shingles so ya don't mark 'em up.

I always leave the bottom row of toeboards on, and move the others up as needed. That way if you fall, the bottom toe board might stop ya.

I also like to use scaffolding or a truck to start off the bottom with, and I leave it in place. That way if ya fall, you don't fall as far.

I've never fallen yet. But ya ever know.

Q: What is the difference between a blonde and an inflatable doll?
A: About two cans of hair spray.

(post #99142, reply #5 of 90)

You've pretty much nailed it, boss. Scaffolding the full length of the eaves is the sine qua non to doing any kind of roof you can't walk naked. Or even those...not much I dislike more than having to kneel facing downslope at the edge of a roof while I lay the first five courses. 4 in 12 doesn't seem steep at all when you're facing up, but....


For the sheathing phase, I'd probably not bother with roof jacks, because it goes up so quickly. Scrap 2x toe boards oughta be sufficient. But once he's shingling up the roof, a nice 2x8 set in jacks sure makes things a lot easier on the ankles....



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #6 of 90)

"Scaffolding the full length of the eaves is the sine qua non to doing any kind of roof you can't walk naked."

Uhhhhhmmmm...I don't do roofs naked. Maybe that's a Canadian thing ???

"For the sheathing phase, I'd probably not bother with roof jacks"

You're right - I didn't think to mention that.

I also didn't really explain what I meant about using a truck for scaffolding. Here's a shot from back when we did our house roof:


The man who achieves makes many mistakes, but he never makes the biggest mistake of all - doing nothing [Benjamin Franklin]

(post #99142, reply #7 of 90)

Thanks for the good responses.  I'll go check out the cost/benefit ration of rental vs. purchasing...usually I find it better to just buy things like this and sell them later if I decide I don't need them around.  It is a good theory; so far I haven't sold anything.......which is why I need a new bigger shop.  --Ken

(post #99142, reply #8 of 90)

This link, will give you an idea what roof jacks will cost and the options on angles or adjustables, etc.  I also agree with having an old foam cushion on the roof with you when you roofing.  Even on a lesser pitch roof, the nail gun, etc will take off if you put them down, the cushion will give you something to put things on without them sliding off the roof.  12/12 isn't comfortable for most people, if your not comfortable, get some type of harness or work rope, the short $$ is better then taking a ride.  The site below is nationwide and has all that type of stuff.


 http://www.abccatalog.com/store/listcategoriesandproducts.asp?idCategory=694

(post #99142, reply #9 of 90)

That's a great resource.  Thanks.  --Ken

(post #99142, reply #10 of 90)

Again, thanks for the great link.  It did raise the question for me, however, of what angle bracket is more comfortable for a 12/12 pitch...the 45 degree (which would leave the toeboard flat) or something like 60 degrees which would allow you to lean forward and have your feet flat.....I suspect the 60 or even 90 degree is what I'd want rather than the 45.....  --Ken

(post #99142, reply #12 of 90)

If you're just going to use the roof jacks on your 12/12 roof, get the 45 degree type and get the 2x8 size. You'll be more comfortable on a flat 2x8 than on a pinched in 2x6. Trust me. At the end of the day, your ankles will thank you.


PS--eat at least two bananas a day for a week prior to doing this job; it'll help you avoid having mean nasty cramps in your calves at 3 o'clock in the morning following your first day up on that roof, LOL....


The 16" length is more than sufficient for what you want to do. No point in paying the extra bucks for the 19-inchers. (That's roof-jack length, of course...not banana length....)


 



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #13 of 90)

I myself prefer the 90 degree one that take a 2x6.


For one thing, if i am sliding down the roof, I want to hit as abrupt an angle to stop me as possible. You can pile shingles and supplies against that square edge somewhat easier, too.


2x8's are too heavy to be carrying up a ladder and around the roof .


That and I don't find anything that makes roofing "comfortable".


Terry

(post #99142, reply #14 of 90)

Well, chacun à son goût.


I've got an assortment of 45's and 60's. My 60's all take 2x6; my 45's all take 2x8. Sometimes I run short of the better type for the roof I'm working on and have to use a few of the other type. While I don't mind working off a 2x6, I'm used to it and can deal with it better than someone who isn't. When you're 40 feet up, a 2x6 can seem awful narrow. That extra 2 inches can be the psychological extra that will make the difference between working comfortably and working scared.


(PIFFIN!! DON'T LOOK!!)



Being able to stand up straight without keeping your ankles in an unnaturally flexed position will go a long way toward comfort, too. If the jack plank isn't level or darn close to it, your ankles will always be bent one way or the other when you walk sideways across the roof face. This can become really tiring and can cause painful calf cramps the evening after a big day up on the roof.


Even a few degrees out is noticeable, especially for a non-professional. I once did a 25-in-12 A-frame working off my 60-degree jacks (that's it in the photo above, too), and of course they weren't quite level until I shimmed out the bottoms with a piece of 1x. I was in no danger of falling off before I did that...but I can tell you even my legs appreciated it once I got the planks level.


 I've been awakened by screaming calves at 3am more times than I want to think about. Eating bananas--which are high in potassium, a trace element that helps your muscles get rid of excess lactic acid accumulated by unaccustomed muscle use--really does help. Why do you think world-class bicycle racers always carry bananas in those dorky pockets on the backs of their jerseys?


As to having the jack planks at a steeper angle to stop you if you're sliding down the roof...well, the point of setting up roof jacks in the first place is so you never have to walk the roof itself. You should have a new row of roof jacks set up every 6 or 8 courses, max. So if you do managed to step off one and slide, you won't have time to build up much speed before you get stopped. Pretty much any angle of jack plank will stop you unless you hit it going so fast smoke is comin' out from under yer butt....



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #27 of 90)

Dinosaur,


Bananas have about one milliequivalent of potassium per inch which means you would have to eat several 30 inch bananas per day to get sufficient potassium for therapeutic reasons.

 I'd pay good money to see Angelina Jolie do that but not you.

(post #99142, reply #28 of 90)

 I'd pay good money to see Angelina Jolie do that but not you.

 Roar!


Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #15 of 90)

Very interesting.  Unfortunately, I'm sort of allergic to bananas, so I'll have to find another fruit..... 


--Ken

(post #99142, reply #18 of 90)

You can get potassium supplements at your pharmacy or health-food store. Bananas are just a tasty way of accomplishing the same thing, plus they provide other stuff a vitamin pill doesn't....


Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #29 of 90)

Look at Potassium with Magnesium supplements, they have all the things your straining muscles need.  Helped my pregnent wife alot!

Rebuilding my home in Cypress, CA


Also a CRX fanatic!

YAY!  I love WYSISYG editing!  And Spellcheck!

____________________________________________________

(post #99142, reply #24 of 90)

HD had some adjustable ones which looked pretty spiffy.  Three different pitch settings. 

(post #99142, reply #25 of 90)

I've seen adjustables here, too, but most of the roofs I work on that need to be worked from jacks are 12/12. It's a popular pitch up here in snow country.


If they're not too expensive they could be the way to go for someone who does a lot of roofing where the pitch varies a lot. But it wouldn't be worth the extra expense for a guy doing his own roof once every 15 years or so....



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #26 of 90)

I feel your pain.

We are doing a complete rebuild where the pitch ranges from 12/12 to 14/12.

No access from the interior is possible, and the roof system is 7" of polyiso insulation - so we don't even have any rafters to attach our jacks to!

I've been practicing levitation all week.

(post #99142, reply #30 of 90)

Difference between the fixed and the adjustable was $2.  Of course, that was 30% of the price of the fixed......

(post #99142, reply #32 of 90)

Difference between the fixed and the adjustable was $2.  Of course, that was 30% of the price of the fixed......


And remember you don't need just five of the little beggers. You need five for each 16 feet of staging at a minimum.


And you need to set a plank every eight to ten courses up the roof, depending on how tall you are.



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #11 of 90)

Uhhhhhmmmm...I don't do roofs naked. Maybe that's a Canadian thing ???


Must be...on account of how cold it is here most of the time, when it finally gets warm enough to even think about doing roofing we're all overheated and so we just strip down.


I also didn't really explain what I meant about using a truck for scaffolding. Here's a shot from back when we did our house roof:



If you don't do roofs naked, howcum your photo is -rated...?



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #16 of 90)

The image didn't seem to take in the last try. Here's another crack at it:


Our main agenda is to have all guns banned. We must use whatever means possible. It does not matter if you have to distort facts or even lie. [Sarah Brady 1994]

(post #99142, reply #17 of 90)

hmmmmm......12/12 huh?   Fun Fun


Just did one about 2 months ago.......it was a one story though.  Had a kicker board on the edge and some 90 degree jacks with 2x6's......I'd get the 60 degree if i did it again though........those things are hard on the ankles.


The bananas probly are a good idea.......i usually eat a lot of bananas anyway cause i like em and they're cheap(30 cents/lb)! LOL  Also, if you're gonna be up there all day, some runners stretchs in the morning and at lunch and when packing up can help a lot too.


Scaffold is a great idea too.......i did a 3 story 10/12 last fall and used the scaffold......had to do some soffit work and left it up.  Give you a lot more security and self confidence which can really keep you from doing something stupid up there. 

When in doubt, get a bigger hammer!

(post #99142, reply #19 of 90)

Well, now I can understand why you weren't nekkid up there; looks like the weather was somewhat brisk....


Wonder what OSHA's take on that scaffolding setup woulda been, LOL....



Dinosaur


A day may come when the courage of men fails,when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship...



But it is not this day.

Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #99142, reply #31 of 90)

I have done my roof (also a 12/12 pitch) twice. Both times I made my own roof jacks from 1"x3"x 14". They were held together with wood screws and had a metal plate under them to hold them to the roof. They were made to hold 2"x6" and worked very well. The second time, I put a metal roof over the shingles. Took me all summer to do it, but after you hit 65, you slow down a little.


After the roof was finished, I took the roof jacks apart and used them in the outdoor fireplace in our back yard.


Definitley use scaffolding. Carrying bundles of shingles up a ladder can get tough in the last part of the day. When I installed the steel roof, I wore a safety belt and 3/4 inch nylon rope that was tied to the bumper of my truck parked on the other side of the house. (The keys were in my pocket).


Good luck and pray for dry weather.


 

(post #99142, reply #33 of 90)

 I made my own roof jacks from 1"x3"x 14".


In the FHB article on roofing from the top down, he used home made jacks.  Three pieces of 2x4, one about 18" to nail to roof and two shorter ones to form desired angle.  bracket was covered on side with plywood for strength and probably glued.



You get out of life what you put into it......minus taxes.


Marv


 


edited for color


Edited 8/31/2005 2:17 pm by Marv

You get out of life what you put into it......minus taxes.

Marv

(post #99142, reply #34 of 90)

I'll have to go back and re-read that article...missed that detail.  --Ken