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siding and soffit cutting jig

rpait's picture

I need help with a cross cut jig so I can cut soffit and siding sticks. I have a basic idea but am hoping to shortcut it quickly by asking for help. also please let me know how many sticks I can cut at a time I estimate 4 probably but input will  be nice. thanks

If vegetarians eat vegetables, what do humanitarians eat?

(post #103563, reply #1 of 11)

What do you need a jig for? If you don't like to just lay a speed square on the piece and cut, then a miter saw (probably sliding) would seem to be the thing to use.

If you have short repeat cuts most miter saws can be equipped with a stop to allow repeat cuts.

If you want to cut multiple pieces, layed edge-to-edge, then something like a panel saw would be in order. Stacked it would just be a question of the saw blade diameter and max depth of cut (though you lose a little control after about the 4th piece).


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #103563, reply #2 of 11)

speed and accuracy for repetitive cuts and not having to worry about it. This way I dont have to measure each time and the sides of the jig helps keep the multiple panels flat . I think

If vegetarians eat vegetables, what do humanitarians eat?

(post #103563, reply #5 of 11)

Your original post specified cutting "sticks".....by which, I assumed you meant 2X or some other framing material.


In this post you mention "panels"....as in vinyl/aluminum soffet panels?


Kinda hard to make recomendations when it's unclear what exactly we're building a jig for.




J. D. Reynolds
Home Improvements



 



 




R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #103563, reply #8 of 11)

down here in Fla a stick is a 10 ft piece of 24" soffit. I am using vinyl but assume the difference would mean using my metal cutting blade vs a reversed 60 tooth ripping blade. I did run across a simple jig on the net that will alow me to cut variable sizes quickly and 4 pieces thick seems to be the max. I will take pics I start Mon the 26th tommorow and let yall know. thanks.

If vegetarians eat vegetables, what do humanitarians eat?

(post #103563, reply #9 of 11)

Here is a jig I made for a recent vinyl job. I can cut three pieces of
soffit or siding at a time with it, or anything else up to 1.5" thick by
14" wide. I just clamp it or screw down to my cut table.

A fine toothed plywood blade works well for cutting vinyl.

(post #103563, reply #10 of 11)

FINALLY! A use for a sidewinder!


{G, D & R}




Democrats.
The other white meat.



 



 




R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #103563, reply #3 of 11)

I worked with a guy that used a large paper cutter (remember from elementary school?). It worked great. We did a few houses with it never a problem.

 

Family.....They're always there when they need you.

(post #103563, reply #4 of 11)

Also, if you're unsteady with your cuts, using a portable circular saw ("Skilsaw"), make a jig like this:

Get a piece of thin plywood, Masonite, scrap paneling, etc maybe 10x10 inches. Glue & screw (through the bottom, with flat-head scress) a piece of straight, smooth wood maybe 1x2 to the plywood, parallel to one edge. (The kinda red piece.)

Attach another piece of wood of similar size to the bottom, at right angles to the first. Don't glue this one, just "tack" is in place with one or two screws for starters. (The blue piece.)

Using the saw and blade you'd use for cutting the siding, cut the right-hand side off the plywood (and the "blue" wood), with the left edge of the saw soleplate rubbing against the "red" piece of wood.

The distance between the "red" board and the freshly cut edge now exactly matches the distance between the left edge of the saw soleplate and the blade.

Now get the best square you have and make a final adjustment on the "blue" board, squaring it up with the freshly cut edge. Secure with a few countersunk flathead screws.

Place this jig on a piece of siding to be cut. Line the right-hand edge of the jig up with the cut line ("waste" to the right, "good" siding piece to the left). Hold the jig tightly against the top edge of the siding (pressing the "blue" piece against the siding edge) and run your saw along the "red" piece just as you did when trimming the plywood.

If you wish, you can leave maybe 2" of plywood projecting on the left side of the red piece, allowing you to use a clamp there to secure the jig.


So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable Creature, since it enables one to find or make a Reason for everything one has a mind to do. --Benjamin Franklin


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #103563, reply #6 of 11)

I make mine and can cut 3 pieces of siding at a time , four if i force them in tight.


As far as J-channel goes they move so you would slide them in to the far side of the jig and cut.


1st cut out your lower piece of 1/2 "plywood 18" x 12"


install two spindles 1 3/8 x 1 3/8 x 12" each and install them through the ply into the spindles with screws, have the spindles spaced 13" apart so you leave yourself about an 1 1/2 " to each side  . This 1 1/2 will be a nail flange to nail to your table once square with your guide. You have now made the bottom.


Attach a 15 3/4 "x 12" piece of ply to the spindles opposite side . attach a yard stick as your saws guide to the face of that plywood.


The attached drawing is the side view. you are looking into the slot where you will slide your siding. the yard stick would be mounted on top ( not in the photo) so you would attach it so your saw runs along the edge of ply but not against it as to cut it. the saw blade should be plywood blade run backwards.

I set up a work bench them nail through the  flange once my guide is set( 2x4 run at a right angle to jig and even with spindle closest to me). I then make marks on the 2x4 for common lengths so i don't need to take out my tape often.

Edited 3/22/2007 11:15 pm ET by AllTrade


Edited 3/22/2007 11:18 pm ET by AllTrade

(post #103563, reply #7 of 11)

rpait,


I use a Van Mark Trim-A-Table built just for siding and soffit.  Nice clean cuts, makes gables a breeze and repeatability is simple with supplied stop. Table extends to 16' but fits in the bed of my truck. I've had mine for ten, maybe twelve years. Tools that make my day easy, I'll take them every time.


Saw

(post #103563, reply #11 of 11)

rpait,


Here is a link to Van Mark http://www.van-mark.com/SawTables/trimtbl/TrimATable.html if you are in the business, this will pay for itself many times over. It will cut angles down to a 2 or 3 pitch with a clean edge. Check e bay for a used one, well worth the money.


Saw