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Standoff Post Base for Large Post

DoRight's picture

When you have a post as part of a porch structure and this post support a substantial roof structure, whiat is the best practice for attaching the post to a concrete pier?

Seconldy if that best practice includes the use of a steel standoff post base where do you get one to fit 10 or 12 inche square timber posts?  I have seen Strongties for 6 inche and I think 8 inche, but not found anything larger.

Thank you. 

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more info would help (post #207254, reply #1 of 9)

Is this a repair/ remodel or new construction?

That's a monster post you describe, is it treated?

I've never seen any stand off hardware that size but it can be fabricated.

I don't see the standoff notion as always required as long as  untreated lumber isn't directly touching  concrete and some method of anchoring is done.

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Post anchoring (post #207254, reply #5 of 9)

Yes, new construction.

No, not an exceptional load required.

Yes, looks is thre reason for the large post.

I asked about what hte best practice was for achoring a post.  I mentioned metal fasteners as a option.  And large standoffs are not readily available.

Would just running a piece of rebar into the concrete and drilling  hole in the botttom of the post be acceptable?  This would not provide for any uplift protection. 

As for the suggestion of using the 10 inch stand off for a 12 inche post, I think most standoffs have metal side plates which would not allow the 12 inch post to slide down betwen the plates.   I suppose in the application I have in mide I could trim the post to fit, as it would not show below deck/porch floor level.

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do (post #207254, reply #6 of 9)

If not seen, an anchor or two with straps (for the hold down)  embedded in concrete footing would certainly fill the bill, fit the post and do what you want.

Isolate the bottom endgrain of the post to both shed water and prevent wicking of moisture up into the post-the deathwise of all post supports.

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For the record.. (post #207254, reply #8 of 9)

Drilling the post and inserting rebar is not a good answer.

 

Using a 10" base and trimming the base to fit is. 

Calvin also had some good input as well.

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Simpson (post #207254, reply #2 of 9)

Simpson makes a standoff base as big as 10x10".  If you are using a 12x12" post that would leave you just an inch overhang on each side.  Surely your post are way over sized for your load.  Sounds like they are sized asthecis rather than the actual load..  In my area a load that would require a post that size would also require a pier size 36+". 

Simpson (post #207254, reply #3 of 9)

Simpson makes a standoff base as big as 10x10".  If you are using a 12x12" post that would leave you just an inch overhang on each side.  Surely your post are way over sized for your load.  Sounds like they are sized asthecis rather than the actual load..  In my area a load that would require a post that size would also require a pier size 36+". 

We typically build houses on (post #207254, reply #4 of 9)

We typically build houses on 8" X 8" post set 6 to 9 feet deep in sand. I doubt you'd need any concrete under the posts at all as long as you're under the frost line.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

If you can't find bases that (post #207254, reply #7 of 9)

If you can't find bases that large locally, any decent hvac guy could bend and solder you copper or galvanized bases to put over the bottom of the post.  Seal the post base first and then put on this upside down cap and seal it with high quality caulk to stop wicking moisture up from the concrete.  Put trim over the metal cap if you prefer and leave it just shy of the concrete.

Post Base (post #207254, reply #9 of 9)

If the base is not going to be visable, you could have a knife plate base fabricated, the plate would fit in a kerf cut into the botom of the post and connected with a through bolt. The base plate can be wider than the post, with holes that allow fastening to the concrete with a wedge anchor or concret bolt such as Simpson's Titen.