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Stucco before or after drywall?

Clewless1's picture

A stucco contractor says the only time to do exterior stucco is after the drywall (which generally will be screwed not nailed). Apparent concern is any hammering will pop off the stucco.


Comments, opinions?

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #1 of 19)

Then the stucco installation will pop the drywall instead (G).


I suppose that if flexing and popping was an issue I'd prefer to do touch-ups on the drywall rather than the stucco.


Perhaps if scheduling was flexible the mesh could be installed on the outside. Then the drywall could be done, followed by the stucco.


Edited 8/30/2008 9:45 pm ET by sisyphus

(post #106972, reply #3 of 19)

yeah, the polystyrene is up and the mesh is on. Sitting in hot (105 degF) sun for weeks waiting for final on the rough, insulation, etc.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #2 of 19)

You need a new stucco contractor!

(post #106972, reply #4 of 19)

If this is stucco over block, Florida style you do the stucco first to keep the moisture out of the drywall.

Greg

(post #106972, reply #6 of 19)

Didn't think of the moisture issue, but it is in a VERY dry climate (RH 1-15% ... yes that is right). So hanging the drywall doesn't cause the stucco to 'pop off'?

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #8 of 19)

I see we have different issues. In Florida rain will blow through unsealed concrete block and "black spot" your drywall. They want the stucco up first. I really don't know much about stucco over wood. I would think these days when they are screwing down the drywall the flexing of the wall shouldn't be that big a problem.

Greg

(post #106972, reply #9 of 19)

we'll see what other say ... thanks

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #10 of 19)

Yer not dealin' with REAL stucco.  Therefore what's the issue?


 

(post #106972, reply #11 of 19)

What do you mean?

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #5 of 19)

In the old days before exterior shear walls, if the stucco was done first, the drywallers would find the studs going in and out.

(post #106972, reply #7 of 19)

You mean warping the framing? This has polystyrene over studs and shear walls.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #12 of 19)

For years that was the standard procedure on a wood frame building with a three coat stucco job. Stucco lath, then drywall, then stucco. Now that drywall is generally screwed instead of nailed I'm not sure it is as important.

John

(post #106972, reply #13 of 19)

Like John said, this was an issue when rock was nailed, I don't think it matters so much any more, although a lot of rockers still tack up with nails, so maybe  the stucco guy has a point.


                            Mike


    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

                            Mike

    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

(post #106972, reply #14 of 19)

I sort of agree with the stucco guy, not that normal tacking with nails would make a difference, but sometimes when adjusting the framing prior to drywall it is necessary to tweak some of the studs.  Big sheets will flex the wall a bit if they are slapped against the wall at all.  Also, it's awfully common to stack a number of sheets on edge leaning on walls which will also flex the wall a bit. 


Having said that, if the framing is checked over and any adjustments are made prior to stucco then I don't see the problem if the rockers are careful (meaning you are the one hanging rock).  The framing would have to be written in stone (passed inspection and closely gone over).


Another reason not to stucco before sheetrock is that windows or doors may need to be tweaked slightly if not installed correctly up front.  I'd want to make sure those are dead on if someone else installed them.  The best example of this was a slightly off center window over a kitchen sink that had to be centered tightly between upper cabinets.  Modifying the cabinets for 1/4" was not an option, but reshimming the window was.  In this case leaving it would have stood out like a sore thumb since that 1/4" made the trim on one side 1/2" wider than the other!


Good building!


 


Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

If I could edit my location it would say I'm now in Reno :-)

(post #106972, reply #15 of 19)

Really ... Ok ... what happens when I'm doing finish work or later want to install a heavy duty picture hangar for some heavy art ... or whatever? I'm new to this stucco thing ... is it really that fragile? I assumed that once it's done, nothing short of a small plane crash would break it off. OK, maybe an RC plane. What if a rock hits it from your mower?

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #106972, reply #16 of 19)

Clewless,

The stucco is that fragile when it is new, and it keeps getting stronger for a long time as it cures. Once the stucco is on for a few months, it is very resistant to damage.

Bill

(post #106972, reply #17 of 19)

is it really that fragile? 


I didn't say it's fragile, just that walls are flexible and sheetrock is not a passive activity.  There is a huge difference between hanging a picture, or finish work and a pair of 250lb. guys slapping up a 70 lb sheet as fast as they can!  How about leaning 20 sheets against a wall.  That's a lot of weight.


 


 


Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

If I could edit my location it would say I'm now in Reno :-)

(post #106972, reply #18 of 19)

good building practice forbids leaning that many sheets against the wall.
Insist that board is delivered laying flat in every room throughout the house.
Here, we do not install drywall unless the outside is papered, stuccomesh and first coat is on. In other words weatherproof. The first coat stucco should sit anyway for about 2 weeks
Re windows adjustment: we always have a "frame" trim around the window. It allows for adjustment and easy replacement later on. The frame usually consists of a flat 1x4 over the windowflange and a 1x2 nailed against the 1x4 on the outside. The stuccostop against the 1x2, then caulked nicely. Of course flashing over windows and doors.

(post #106972, reply #19 of 19)

good building practice forbids leaning that many sheets against the wall.


Agreed. 


Life would be easier if all subs followed "good building practices" without being told.  :-)


 


 


Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

If I could edit my location it would say I'm now in Reno :-)