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What is correct glue to attach EPS foam to concrete?

boschvaark's picture

Anyone out there have experience gluing EPS foam to concrete?  I'm looking for a reliable method of attaching foam to concrete, which will be followed by drywall in a basement build - out.  And metal fasteners are out - the guy I'm working for is terrified of thermal bridging.  Got ideas?  Tell me.  Got experience with glue?  Tell me more, wether your results were negative or positive!!

 

Thanks

How is the drywall to be (post #199131, reply #1 of 19)

How is the drywall to be attached?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

http://www.loctiteproducts.co (post #199131, reply #2 of 19)

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/12/5/pg_ca_foam/overview/Loctite-Power-Grab-Foamboard-Construction-Adhesive.htm

I think the above is only available in small tubes.

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/12/29/pl_ca_300_voc/overview/Loctite-PL-300-VOC-Foamboard-Adhesive.htm

Should be had in large tubes.

 

There's plenty of others-read the labels-it either will melt the foam or adhere it.

 

Never tried it but it's been said you can use can spray foam to "fasten" foambd. to block/concrete/anything.  It's sticky enough, but high expansion foams would move the board as it sets.

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I've use the gun foam (post #199131, reply #3 of 19)

I've use the gun foam adhesive - really sticky!  Once it's out of the gun it doesn't blow up too much more.  You could use Tapcons to initially hold the foam to the wall, then back them out later.

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Once again, I'm wondering how (post #199131, reply #4 of 19)

Once again, I'm wondering how the drywall's going to be secured.  If simply glued to the foam then a better-than-average adhesive is needed.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I was thinking he was using (post #199131, reply #6 of 19)

I was thinking he was using foam as the continuos thermal break, but inside that he would frame a regular 2x4 stud wall, with wood or steel (prefferably steel).

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Yes, you could assume that.  (post #199131, reply #7 of 19)

Yes, you could assume that.  Not clear that that's what he intends, though.  He said "foam, followed by drywall", with no metal fasteners. 


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

PL300 as calvin (post #199131, reply #5 of 19)

PL300 as calvin mentioned.

If your concrete walls are smooth use the adhesive as you would putting up drywall or paneling. Several squigley lines and press the board in place. If the concrete walls are wavey or have lots of small warts use fairly large gobs of adhesive and press it in place. I prop a couple of 2x4 against the board to hold it in place untill the glue sets or I get either a stud wall  built in front of it (add more insulation in the stud cavities), or attach furring strips over the foam with tapcons.

I like the stud wall in front because it  allows the use of standard electrical boxes and wire routing. With furring strips you have to use shallow boxes and rout the wiring in the foam to get it the require depth (1 1/4") away from the furring strip faces to pass inspection.

I prefer the foam gun glue. (post #199131, reply #8 of 19)

I prefer the foam gun glue. It kicks in 15-20 minutes vs overnight for the PL300. Cheaper too.

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

Glue (post #199131, reply #9 of 19)

Got a link?

I haven't tried that yet, and have about 100 lf of 9' wall left to do'

Cheaper is gooooood!

I used to use Enerfoam which (post #199131, reply #10 of 19)

I used to use Enerfoam which was first eveloped as a glue rather tan as a insulator. But now my local lumber yards make it easier for me to get te Great stuff product line. They have their own gunb, and at last three kinds of foam. One is a low expansion that is fopr doors and windows. It cures soft and foamy like a sponge, so I would not use it. Then there is the regular which is an insuilator andcures hrd, but has a fair amt of expansion, so it would fight with yo on panbels.


But just like Goldilocks found her perfect bed and piot of poridge, they make the wall panel and subfloor adhesive also, which is just right. you cando 12-254 panels with a can of it, depending on temperature and how much you apply.

 

The guns made for the removeable cans like this have a flow control knob, and can be cleaned.

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

Thanks (post #199131, reply #11 of 19)

Good to know.

Thanks

One thing to know about foam (post #199131, reply #12 of 19)

One thing to know about foam - it has an expiration date like milk!  Check your cans when you buy them, you probably won't be able to return them.

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I returned one last thiursday (post #199131, reply #13 of 19)

I returned one last thiursday

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

I'll correct myself:  I (post #199131, reply #15 of 19)

I'll correct myself:  I didn't realize foam had an expiration date until I found I had expired cans a couple months after I bought them.

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Hey y'all,   Thanks for (post #199131, reply #14 of 19)

Hey y'all,

 


Thanks for the replies:  I like the "Goldilocks"  foam... gotta try it just because of your description.  There is to be no framing whatsoever, thermal bridge and all.  At least that's the idea.  Boss has no problem that I know of with using Tapcons as temporary "clamps".  100% correct on the idea that "better than average" bond strength is necessary, and what I was looking for.  We figuredwe'd use a spiderweb of 2x from existing framing to press the foam & drywall tight to the concrete would hold it in place while the glue dries. 


Next step:  Experiments.... 2' x 4' strips glued using the glues you all have given the heads up to, then the drywall, then some sort of stress test.

How you planning on doing the (post #199131, reply #16 of 19)

How you planning on doing the electrical required outlets and such?

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Re: EPS Adhesives (post #199131, reply #17 of 19)

We manufacture the adhesive and would be happy to sell and ship you anything you need.  Check out our website, www.stucoflex.com  The adhesive for the foam to concrete would either be PRM or Stuc-O-Base.  Email me for more information.

Hey Bob, remember that the (post #199131, reply #19 of 19)

Hey Bob... Thanks!  Your post looks very proffesional now.

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Remember..... (post #199131, reply #18 of 19)

I do understand the purposes of the site and I apologize if you took me as drive by spam.  Im not trying to hide what I do or just generate leads but if that happens, great!  I work for a synthetic stucco/EIFS manufacturer though and the products he is looking for we make and ship all over the country.Actually we make the best products on the market for the EIFS/stucco industry due to the enhanced and advanced liquid polymer used in our products.  We do not experience hairline cracks in stucco, hence the name Stuc-O-Flex.  I added a signature line for you so you dont think Im spam and also attached a product data sheet for the adhesive he is looking for.  All you have to do is add water.  You can also check out our website, www.stucoflex.com

 

Bob Moore

bob@stucoflex.com

Stuc-O-Flex Intl.

800-305-1045 

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