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What is a "hog rafter" or "rafter hog"?

ThumbWhacker's picture

There are a few notes on my new house roof plans that say "2x6 hog @ rafters". It appears to be some sort of support for the rafters, it's about 4' down from the ridge, on a 22' long rafter, 12/12 pitch simple gable roof. Could someone who knows alot more about roofing give me a mental picture of this, or better yet a real one? Thanks for all your wisdom, it's greatly appreciated by the rookies like me!

Whacker of thumbs

(post #100349, reply #1 of 25)

Truss Hog will come along to tell you. :0)

(post #100349, reply #2 of 25)

Don't know for sure what 'hog' stands for, but I imagine what they're looking for is what I've heard called a collar tie. This is simply a board that is nailed horizontally between opposing rafters to prevent the roof system from pushing out the bearing walls. These are used in vaulted ceiling applications where you don't have the benefit of ceiling joists to hold your bearing walls stiff. Does this make sense? 

(post #100349, reply #11 of 25)

The location is similar to a collar tie but Iget the impression like the other guys that this is running perpendicular to th erafters as a strongback type element.

BTW, a collar tie does nothing to prevent wall spread. A rafter tie in the lower third of the rafters does that. A collar tie serves another purpose entirely.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #100349, reply #20 of 25)

"collar tie serves another purpose entirely"


I'm on the edge of my seat.  Praytell, what do it do?

(post #100349, reply #21 of 25)

to keep the rafters from seperating at the ridge  ... ie: "collar tie"... not waist belt


collar ties do not keep the walls from separating  .. ceiling joists do that.. if they tie one wall to the other


collar ties  tie the ridge


Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

              www.mfsmithbuilder.com

(post #100349, reply #22 of 25)

Just like a collar on your shirt has a different function from the hunk of hemp you tie on your pants waist to keep them from falling down, the collar on a rafter has a different function from the raftere tie in the lower portion of the rafter. One holds the head up, the other holds the waist in.

;)

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #100349, reply #3 of 25)

It sounds like a purlin to me.  Do a Yahoo Image Search for "roof purlin", you'll get a bunch of pictures

(post #100349, reply #4 of 25)

I've heard "hog trough" and "strongback" to describe stiffeners made of 2 boards nailed into a "v" and then nailed to the rafters or joists. 2x6 would seem a bit much.

Butch

"I'm gettin' a lot better at just barely gettin' by."

(post #100349, reply #6 of 25)

That was the first thing that came to my mind, though I've only put those at the gable rake, particularly truss gable rake.

(post #100349, reply #5 of 25)

bump

 


 

 


'Nemo me impune lacesset'
No one will provoke me with impunity

 

 
   

'Nemo me impune lacesset'
No one will provoke me with impunity

(post #100349, reply #7 of 25)

Thanks for the bump, but I've never heard the term before.

The OP would probably be best to ask the person who drew the plans what they meant.

I now qualify for the witless protection program. [Adam Rifkin]

(post #100349, reply #8 of 25)

Never heard of that term. It's probably what we call a "snowbrace" around here. Snowbraces are some form of beam that essentially cuts down the span of the long rafter.


It also could be collar ties.


I agree with Boss. Call the drawer.


blue


 

"...

keep looking for customers who want to hire  YOU.. all the rest are looking for commodities.. are you  a commodity ?... if you get sucked into "free estimates" and  "soliciting bids"... then you are a commodity... if your operation is set up to compete as a commodity, then have at it..... but be prepared to keep your margins low and your overhead  high...."

From the best of TauntonU.

(post #100349, reply #9 of 25)

"I agree with Boss."

I'm gonna have to mark that one down on my calendar.

(-:

I'm not going to have some reporters pawing through our papers. We are the president. [Hillary Clinton]

(post #100349, reply #10 of 25)

Just a WAG, but could it refer to a support or brace to create a slight arch in the rafter?


I've heard of the opposite of a rafter sagging referred to as "hogging".


Joe Bartok
Joe Bartok

(post #100349, reply #13 of 25)

Hmmm...

There would be some loggic in thinking the term hog could be short for hogback then

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #100349, reply #12 of 25)

Blue, there's a picture of one of your saws on the front page   ;)


http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/fh_177_096.asp#


 

 

(post #100349, reply #18 of 25)


 


SamT
A Pragmatic Classical Liberal, aka Libertarian.

I'm always right!
Except when I'm not.

(post #100349, reply #19 of 25)

That looks like a good ol PC 508 or a well worn Rockwell 312 or something like that. I'm kinda sure it isn't a 315. I don't think it's a 508 because the handle was more streamlined, I think. I never liked the 508 because they were too heavy for light residential framing like we do.


I also recognize the old planer blade, which I would never use except when trimming. There were too many teeth to file when the blade lost it's edge.


I wouldn't use anything that dangerous. The exposed blade at the top of the saw is totally unneccary.


I did have a foreman (he was a great guy, I still love him dearly) that took EVERYTHING off a saw...meaning the entire shroud and also the entire shoe and of course the guard. He thought he was going to be clever and be able to cut heats easily.  In those days  no one had a sawzall. We used chisels and hand saws.


That crazy hillbilly cut his hand up pretty bad on the first cut!


blue


 


 

"...

keep looking for customers who want to hire  YOU.. all the rest are looking for commodities.. are you  a commodity ?... if you get sucked into "free estimates" and  "soliciting bids"... then you are a commodity... if your operation is set up to compete as a commodity, then have at it..... but be prepared to keep your margins low and your overhead  high...."

From the best of TauntonU.

(post #100349, reply #14 of 25)

If nobody here knows for sure, which it looks like is the case,  I say get back to whoever drew the plans and ask the q.  It's not unusual for plans to have bogus or ambiguous info on them...  Also, ask where he/she got the term and let us know the story...


 

Matt

(post #100349, reply #16 of 25)

So what'd you find out?

 


 

 


'Nemo me impune lacesset'
No one will provoke me with impunity

 

 
   

'Nemo me impune lacesset'
No one will provoke me with impunity

(post #100349, reply #15 of 25)

Try asking the company that drew the plans.

(post #100349, reply #17 of 25)

I'm curious, what part of the country are you in? I've always found regional terms interesting. And what are these 2 X6s bearing on?

Okay, collar or collar ties (post #100349, reply #23 of 25)

Okay, collar or collar ties is place under the ridge to hold the ridge together. Very common when there is no ridge pole. When A ridgepole Is used it can use or not , That was always a huge discussion on jobs. When I was the boss we use them.

when a brace is use like 4' down running from rafter to rafter this is call a wind/ snow / ice brace. True placement is 40% down not quite half way, The brace is making the rafter work together to carry the load. It also use to clear attic for flooring for storage.

Now the question at hand!  Hogg rafter,  also called a rat run, stiff back, strong back. This is a 2x4 nail flat to the ceiling joist at center of the span with a 2x6 on edge. Wider the span large the lumber. This is a short cut of the bracing called bridging between ceiling and floor joist.

 

and you don't have to agree this is just my opinion

thanks, the old staircase man 

.

Hog rafter (post #100349, reply #24 of 25)

I hope the guy that first posted the question is still alive to see your answer.  He posted it some eight years ago.

I was alive 8 years ago, (post #100349, reply #25 of 25)

I was alive 8 years ago, still alive...  Carry on.