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Where to put blocking for drywall

PeteBradley's picture

HO finishing a room over a garage. It's got a 4' kneeewall. I'm not going to do the rock but I do need to put in any appropriate blocking for it. Can someone point me at a reference for what parts need to be blocked and how? For example, I expect the transition from the rafters to the ceiling joists might need blocking.

Thanks,

Pete

(post #96771, reply #1 of 9)

I expect the transition from the rafters to the ceiling joists might need blocking.


No....not necessarily. I don`t know how familiar you are with sheetrocking (or construction in general), so I`ll try not to confuse you...K.I.S.S.


It will require a bit of visualization on your part. Drywall is installed perpendicularly to the framing. Inside corners, be they wall to wall, or wall to ceiling, are where you are most likely to find a need for blocking. Example.....where partition walls meet....if you have any partitions running into perimeter walls, it is likely you will need blocking on at least one side of the partition where it meets the perimeter wall. Same for where a partition meets the ceiling where the joists run parallel to your wall. Assuming the framing is 16" OC, its possible that where it meets the ceiling you`ll have a joist to one side of the wall.....you`ll need blocking to the other.


I hope this makes sense to you...if not...lemme know...I`ll give it another try.


J. D. Reynolds


Home Improvements


"DO IT RIGHT, DO IT ONCE"

R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #96771, reply #2 of 9)

I don't know a lot about drywall, so simple is good.  What you wrote makes sense.  This room is under the peak of a roof.  Since there's an inside corner (135 degrees) where the kneewall meets the rafters and where the rafters meet the ceiling joists, is there a need for blocking there?


Pete

(post #96771, reply #3 of 9)

Do you already have someone lined up for doing the drywall??  If so, ask them where/what blocking they want.  Different sheet rockers can want blocking in different areas. 


I would say that you dont need blocking where you go from knee wall to rafter wall to ceiling.  Just think of it as one big wall that has 2 bends or joint in it.  I/ we dont usually but blocking in the middle of a wall run for drywall.


         ________        ceiling


      /


   /     rafter wall


 /


|      knee wall


|


( love my graphics??!!)


Hope this makes sense what Im saying.  If not, ask again or hopefully someone can give a better answer/explanation.


-m2akita

Live by the sword, die by the sword....choose your sword wisely.

(post #96771, reply #4 of 9)

 Generally you don't need any backing between your rafters since they will rock the lid first and then the walls, which should have a top plate or two for backing.


 What you might consider is backing for anything that you will hang on the walls closet rod holders, tiolet paper dispenser, TV stand stuff like that.


Dave

(post #96771, reply #5 of 9)

They say a picture is worth a thousand words...lemme try. I realize this doesn`t represent your project....just an attempt to illustrate where blocking would typically be needed.

J. D. Reynolds


Home Improvements


"DO IT RIGHT, DO IT ONCE"

R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #96771, reply #6 of 9)

And here`s another...hope they help.

J. D. Reynolds


Home Improvements


"DO IT RIGHT, DO IT ONCE"

R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #96771, reply #7 of 9)

Sorta. One of the things I didn't make clear is that there's a rafter wall involved in mine. M2AKITA's picture (post 4 in this thread) shows it.

Pete

(post #96771, reply #9 of 9)

No....you made yourself clear....I mentioned in my original response that blocking is not necessarily required anywhere in particular in that situation. My diagrams were attempts to illustrate instances where they would be. Like I said....you need to visualize the sheetrock installation. Note which way the boards are running....where one plane meets another...is there framing available to attach sheetrock to?


Basically, drywall needs nailing at 16" intervals, and at either end.....its typically the ends of runs, created when partitions create those ends, that will be in need of blocking.


I do hope I`m being somewhat helpful. As someone else mentioned earlier....once you have a drywaller lined up, have him let you know where he wants the blocking.


Good luck!


J. D. Reynolds


Home Improvements


"DO IT RIGHT, DO IT ONCE"

R.I.P. RAZZMAN

 

 



(post #96771, reply #8 of 9)

I agree with what everyone else said, and Dave had very good advice that lots of people forget--to block where things will be hung later. Also, but blocks where drywall might be bumped or kicked--like where there is a step up from one room to another or around where a fireplace hearth meets the wall.