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Adding Clear Insulation to Decorative Glass Single Pane Windows

Barshfield's picture

I've got two door-sized exterior panels of single pane decorative glass (clear, but frosted with a deeply sculpted pattern from the 1960s). When the sun hits it, it is like a magnifying glass (sort of) and bakes us inside.  I am thinking of adding either plexiglass panels or shrink film on yhe inside to help insulate.  What do you all recommend?  Thanks, Mark

If the problem is sunlight (post #207793, reply #1 of 12)

If the problem is sunlight coming through then you need something reflective.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

the light we like, the heat (post #207793, reply #2 of 12)

the light we like, the heat we don't. . . .

But the heat is from the (post #207793, reply #3 of 12)

But the heat is from the light.

(It probably won't hurt to experiment with shrink-wrap film.  It will be about as effective as a glass/plastic layer, just less durable (and cheaper/easier).  If it works to suit you then you can work on a more permanent fix.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Neither of your choices will (post #207793, reply #4 of 12)

Neither of your choices will help your situation. You don't have many options. The big box store sell a framed glass panel lwith mini- blinds inside for about $150.00. This unit mounts on the inside of the door and the blinds will allow you to control how much sunlight gets through.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/ODL-22-in-w-x...

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

U need IR reflection.  1st (post #207793, reply #5 of 12)

U need IR reflection. 

1st google hit, not an add, this stuff is rpicey, I'd replace the entire window with insulated unit with Ar and reflective coating first.  Just something ot give you ideas about what to search for , eh

http://apex-window-film-store.com/store/product.php?productid=17579

Wait!!  You don't make your (post #207793, reply #6 of 12)

Wait!!  You don't make your own reflective glass??  Or use salvaged fighter jet canopies?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

well, figured the OP did NOT (post #207793, reply #11 of 12)

well, figured the OP did NOT have a vacuum chamber big enough for his window and the pumps needed for e-4 vacuum. If OP does have such, then it is a very simple matter of sputtering some Al onto the surface, about 2 micron is a good thickness for IR

reflecting heat (post #207793, reply #7 of 12)

What you need is a mirror thin plastic film that is stuck to the glass and reflects most of the infrared radiation.

Be carefull with film (post #207793, reply #8 of 12)

Many window's warranty is voided if a film is applied, as the pane may crack owing to its movement being inhibited by the film. The bigger the pane, the greater the risk.

Can you put an awning over the door?

Good luck.

The configuration won't (post #207793, reply #9 of 12)

The configuration won't support an awning.  And these windows are original to the house (1960), so any warranty is long expired. 

So I'm thinking of a shrink film instead.  It's relatively cheap and, if it doesn't work, I can take it off.  No harm?

Be careful what you wish for. (post #207793, reply #10 of 12)

The single most reflective window film (I had to research this some years ago) is Mylar. Anybody looking into the window from outside will see what appears to be tin foil instead of transparent glass.

No harm? You may end up with a cracked pane.

 

Good luck.

Storm window (post #207793, reply #12 of 12)

I would look into having a single pane storm made, with a surface-4 low-e coating on it. Or, a double pane storm with a surface 2 coating. I don't think any of the film ideas are going to do much, although there are films that reduce solar heat gain dramatically if you can adhere them to the glass (need smooth glass for that).