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Adding soundproofing/insulation to interior walls

mzwolinski's picture

I just recently moved into a new home, and the builder installed 1/2" drywall throughout the house. On the exterior they put fiberglass batts but nothing on the interior walls. The hollow stud space with 1/2" drywall seems to almost magnify the sound from the next room. What can I do to add some soundproofing to my interior walls to help quiet the house short of tearing the drywall out of my new house. Thanks!

You could get cellulose blown (post #216537, reply #1 of 5)

You could get cellulose blown in.  It would involve drilling (and then patching) holes in each stud bay.  Or fasten foam to one side of the wall and cover with another layer of drywall.  Or simply glue on another layer of drywall (without anything in-between).


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

You can blow in cellulose as (post #216537, reply #2 of 5)

You can blow in cellulose as suggested but you need to be aware that some interior stud bays are part of the HVAC system.  If that is the case, you cant insulate them with anything....

The other thing you could do it lay off the $ tacos on Taco Tuesday......

cuss (post #216537, reply #3 of 5)

cussnu2 wrote:

You can blow in cellulose as suggested but you need to be aware that some interior stud bays are part of the HVAC system.  If that is the case, you cant insulate them with anything....

The other thing you could do it lay off the $ tacos on Taco Tuesday......

 

Excellent tip on the possibility of air returns etc in the reply.  It’s something professionals would look for and see but might slip their mind in an online reply.

nicely done.

 

 

 

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A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

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Note that for sound dampening (post #216537, reply #4 of 5)

Note that for sound dampening you don't need to hit every stud bay.  Roughly every other bay would be sufficient.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

An empty house always sounds (post #216537, reply #5 of 5)

An empty house always sounds loud, especially if you have wood floors.  Interior walls are very rarely soundproofed but if you have to the first thing is to seal cracks with acoustic caulk. Do all around the room where baseboard touches the floor, around electric outlets and any other wall penetrations. The most important area will be doors into the room. They should be soild, have vinyl seals around the edges and a threshold at the bottom.  If that isn't enough add 5/8" drywall on top of the existing walls, sealed with acoustical caulk. Mass is your friend when you soundproof. 

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.