Search the forums

Loading

Energy Kinetics system 2000 Water Leak

JIMMIEM's picture

I have an Energy Kinetics System 200 furnace which is 1 1/2 years old.  It sits in the basement below a fireplace hearth on the floor above it.  I had been cutting and chiseling brick and mortar on the fireplace hearth and some of the dust and small pieces fell into the basement through a small joint (1/8") .  Some of this landed on the top of the furnace.  I vacuumned the top of the furnace.  Next day I found a small puddle of water beside the furnace but could not tell where it came from....no wet pipe joints. There have not been any more puddles in almost a week now.  I may have lightly touched some of the pipes or relief valve but nothing was jolted.  I contacted Energy Kinetics and the response was there should not be any water.  I've been keeping watch on the furnace.  Call a tech or wait and see?   

    

I'd wait.  Is there a (post #210256, reply #1 of 7)

I'd wait.  Is there a condensate pump? Maybe a chunk hit it and splashed out some water.

wait (post #210256, reply #3 of 7)

I don't know what a condensate pump is.  I'll check the owner's manual. Chunks were real small...no more than 1/8".  Thank you for your reply....stay tuned.

How small a puddle?  How long (post #210256, reply #2 of 7)

How small a puddle?  How long did it look like it had been there?  Where there any valves, etc, in the area directly above the origin are of the puddle?

And would you have even looked there if you hadn't been down there the previous day cleaning off the furnace?  Ie, might this have happened in the past but gone unnoticed?

Best guess is that a relief valve "burped" due to a pressure surge.  Or the cat peed there.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Puddle (post #210256, reply #4 of 7)

Maybe a pint or so.  It couldn't have been there long as I did the vacuumning the previous day including the floor around the furnace and it was dry then.  There is a faucet drain right over where the water was.  I checked it and there may have been a bit of dampness in the opening but I wouldn't swear to it as I was running my fingers over all the solder and threaded joints and one of them have been damp but I have checked twice a day since then and nothing's wet.  I check the furnace periodically when I'm in the basement making sawdust but the lighting around the furnace isn't great and there are shadows so I guess it could have happened before and I never noticed.  As you suggest I'll keep watching for a while.  Thank You for your response.

Almost forgot.....no cat and the Pied Piper took care of the mice.  

I saw your profile....what type of IT are you in and who's Eisenhower?

The way to check plumbing for (post #210256, reply #5 of 7)

The way to check plumbing for slow leaks is to take a piece of "facial tissue" and dab around the pipes with it.  Any water at all will show up as spots on the paper when you open it up.

But it's possible for your standard hose faucet to leak intermittently under certain (sliightly weird) circumstances.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

jim (post #210256, reply #6 of 7)

Who's Eisenhower?

The one who beat Adlai Stevenson (sp) a couple times.

 

 

This an other questions can be answered in person at this years Fest-located within spitting distance of your current domain.

There'll be a plenty of opinions, but you want answers.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Whistle while you (post #210256, reply #7 of 7)

Whistle while you work

Stevenson's a jerk

Eisenhower's got the power

Whistle while you work

 

As for IT, yes I am, anytime anything goes wrong at work (or at home, for that matter).


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville