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Mini split compressor and rodents

richardi's picture

I am having a house built along the coast  in SE Mass that will be heated by radiant floor heat. I plan on using a multiple zone mini split system for those few days when A/C would be needed as well as dehumification in the lower level, a walkout basement.

When I mentioned the mini split option to a friend, he warned about mice getting in the compressor and chewing the wires. Has anyone heard of this problem? Would mounting the compressor on the side of the house to get it off the ground alleviate this problem?

Also, would the use of the mini splits and regular exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathrooms eliminate the need for a HRV?

Thanks!   

I would think the hazard (post #207287, reply #1 of 9)

I would think the hazard would be no different from any other outside device (such as a standard "whole house" AC compressor).  Some will be designed better than others with regard to mouse-proofness, I suppose. 

Armored wire should be used to supply the unit, and internal wiring should be somehow armored.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

outside devices and rodents (post #207287, reply #4 of 9)

DanH -

I guess that's a preventative solution, armoring the internal wiring, I'll bet that's easier said than done.

Thanks!

It's a way to judge the (post #207287, reply #7 of 9)

It's a way to judge the quality of the unit -- the manufacturer should use armored cable for all exposed wiring.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Re:  Any need for HRV?  Your (post #207287, reply #2 of 9)

Re:  Any need for HRV?  Your proposed combination will not function as an HRV would, because it won't recover heat from the exhausted air. But, heat recovery is probably not a big issue for intermittent-use exhausts like kitchen and bath types.

However, if your new house will be very airtight, it could need an HRV to improve indoor air quality. This addition would require some sort of ducting to effectively distribute the outdoor air throughout the house.

Need HRV (post #207287, reply #5 of 9)

rdesigns -

Ok, what about bathroom and/or kitchen odors?

Do you have a preference to a HRV manufacturer?

Thanks!

I'm not experienced with (post #207287, reply #8 of 9)

I'm not experienced with various HRV makes, but there are people on this forum who are.

As for bath and kitchen odors, you'll still need exhaust fans that serve those specific areas--the HRV by itself won't eliminate the odors concentrated in those areas, but it will provide the needed make-up air for the exhaust fans.

And, in a really tight house, exhaust fans alone are not very effective, because they can only exhaust air that can be replaced (make-up air). For example, an exhaust fan rated at 50 CFM may actually have a measured flow of only 10 CFM in a tight house, and depending on how long and convoluted its duct is.

Your plan to install both the HRV and exhaust fans is the best way.

I have 2 mini splits and the (post #207287, reply #3 of 9)

I have 2 mini splits and the holes in the unit are too small for most rodents.

Greg

mini splits and rodents (post #207287, reply #6 of 9)

Greg -

May I ask the brand that you have? My proposal is for Fujistsu.

Thanks!

One of mine is Fujistu, 1 ton (post #207287, reply #9 of 9)

One of mine is Fujistu, 1 ton heat pump.

Greg