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bc's picture

Is it worth spending additional money for the R19? as opposed to R13?

(post #115399, reply #1 of 11)

probably NC   is differant in that your major energy use is with A/C not heat. I do know that the better you are insulated the less it costs you for either..


  Great insulation saves my family well in excess of $1500 per year in spite of the new house being 2 as large with 3 times the number of windows.  So if everything was the same I suspect the number would have been closer to $3000 a year savings..


   If you want you can do an energy calculation or just accept the better you are insulated the less it costs to maintain comfort.

(post #115399, reply #2 of 11)

My thumb suck is that you'll save about 15-20% on heating/cooling, plus the house will be more comfortable.


Corporation: n. An ingenious device for obtaining individual profit without individual responsibility. --Ambrose Bierce


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #115399, reply #3 of 11)

Wall, ceiling?

What size cavity?

New, old construction?

What is the total construction from paint/wallpaper on the inside to the outside air?

What is the price difference?

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A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #115399, reply #4 of 11)

Depends what you are doing with it. If you are trying to stuff it into a 2x4 wall space, less likely to be worthwhile. Most other applications, insulation pays for itself.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #115399, reply #5 of 11)

crawlspace on a ranch home... noticed the R13 was 3.5 in. thick. R-19 was 6.5 in.

(post #115399, reply #6 of 11)

"crawlspace on a ranch home."

None of the above.

Go to a sealed/conditioned crawlspace.

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.
A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #115399, reply #8 of 11)

was down there earlier also have a mold problem. not sure how to make it conditioned?

(post #115399, reply #9 of 11)

FHB has done a couple of article on it. And google will find more.

The basic concept is that the crawlspace be brought into the house environment.

Bascially you cleanup any souces of moisture, install a vapor barrier over the floor of the crawlspace, insulate the foundation walls, and SEAL ANY FOUNDATION VENTS.

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A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #115399, reply #10 of 11)

OK, then first thing is to fiond out why you have a mold problem. Is there a soil foloor?

Are vents in place and what time of year are they left open?

Does the soil flood seasonally?

Is there a sump pump fully operational?

is there a VB in place and where is it?

What is your climate?

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #115399, reply #11 of 11)

Then maybe consider enclosing the crawlspace ... put put a vapor retarder on the ground first and make it a ventable space for those milder times of year. Maybe it is enclosed now? That would explain the excess moisture.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #115399, reply #7 of 11)

yes

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"You cannot work hard enough to make up for a sloppy estimate."

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"You cannot work hard enough to make up for a sloppy estimate."