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woodstove pipe dampers.

Sphere's picture

While I am addressing this to "all" , specifically, I am looking for Dinosaur.

I recall a thread , or mention of stove pipe "flippers" that curtail the volume of heat/gases/smoke..that are typically installed in metal single wall stovepipe ..herafter known as SP.

I believe Dinosaur said they are not ( insert something here) needed or wanted, that all the flue gases are "set" by the air intake and not having a pipe damper is a GOOD thing.

I am borderline on a disagreement, but want to level the field here a bit..

I am in KY, (USA) and have a very simple, not high efficiency, stove kit from a 55 gal drum ( oh, how the eye's will roll), and a plethora of well seasoned hardwoods..ok?

This stove, (of which is my second generation or so) has a built in collar for a 6" flapper..came with it BTW. I use that to slow the burn ( in coordinance with the air intake vents) for "banking" purposes...and if in the event of a "runaway fire" or over heating, I can basically leave more smoke in the burn chamber, and cut off the new air by closing the intake ports.

My question is for those of us who have some of the newer, (or older) stoves is..do y'all ever use a pipedamper in the SP? Or just leave it at full throttle?

My experiance ( thanks david Thomas in AlasKa) in 20 (very) Odd yrs of burning wood is that the pipe damper is vital..I may be wrong.

What do the experts of wood combustion have to say?

Dinosaur, if I misquoted you..I apologive in advance, it just seems a recent thread brought this up..comere an shoot me..but bring some of tha CAnadien wood tha YOU burn 15 cords of..LOL

Any heads out there. that wanna relate?

 


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(post #111566, reply #1 of 53)

I was alway taught to burn the fire hot to warmn the place, open vent . and then at bedtime close the vent and slow burn, to maintain the warmth.

(post #111566, reply #2 of 53)

Thank you southern boy ( no offense) I agree.

 


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(post #111566, reply #3 of 53)

I'm certainly no Ed Hilton (expert), but I have a damper on my woodstove pipe that I have never used one bit in over 15 years and plan to remove next time I clean the system. Everything gets controlled by the amount of air I let into the stove.


Al Mollitor, Sharon MA

(post #111566, reply #4 of 53)

stove info?

is it an after thought or a requested damper? Or did ya just happen to install it?

my stove is a kit for a drum..Vogelsang..a pic can happen if needed..BTW..it's glowin red..LOL

 


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(post #111566, reply #10 of 53)

here's my two cents worth - OK,Maybe three cents

The pipe damper does help control the flow of flue gases.
In good highly efficient stoves, this may very well be un-needed, because the draft can be controled pretty well at the point of injection.

But not all stoves are that tight, not do many tight stoves stay tight forever.

When it is important to control that draft are in cases of chimney fire, overloading ( guests can do that to you), or windy nights.

When the wind is blowing strong ( I know you probably never see more than a breeze in your neck of the country though) it amplifies the updraft. Even though the intake port is small, a stronger updraft will increase the velocity of the air intake, making for a greater volumn of O2 introduced to the flame and torching the armfull of carefully shepherded firewood in short time. Same princiople aas the blacksmith with a bellows.

The pipe damper control helps to offset that nicely, adding safety and efficiency to the system

But you already knew that, didn't you?

;)

 

 


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(post #111566, reply #14 of 53)

yes I did thank you...(G)

 


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(post #111566, reply #23 of 53)

My stove is a small freestanding unit that I set in my fireplace. I added a damper to the pipe right on top of the unit, I guess because the salesman suggested it, but that was a long time ago. The damper is connected to about 6 feet of stainless flex pipe that goes up into the original masonry chimney. The stove has an air intake slide control that lets me slow the burn way down. I never felt the need for any more control. The stove also has a catalytic converter that's suposed to increase the efficiency.


I was planning to remove the damper because I never use it and it's getting rusty, but the safety considerations presented by Hube and others have me re-thinking that.


Al

(post #111566, reply #27 of 53)

<The damper is connected to about 6 feet of stainless flex pipe that goes up into the original masonry chimney>

HUH?...flappres don't like that..FLex I.D is NOT condusive to a flapper..a trans fit MAYBE..but,,,no.

The stove you have, ( I assume) should have a Collar, for the damper, NO way can ya mount a flapper in a flexi-steel ...no way.

 


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(post #111566, reply #31 of 53)

Exactly. The flpper is in it's own rigid steel sleeve, about 6" long. This sleeve is the transition from the stove to the flexible stainless.


Al

(post #111566, reply #32 of 53)

Been burning wood as auxiliary heat for most of the last 30yrs and agree with the majority here.  For airtights no need for a flue damper.  Everything else needs one. 


Y'day was the first really cold day here, ie low 20s for a high, and as usual, we began the dance with the thermostat for the furnace.  Set it to 76 during the day to keep some heat in parts of the house, 68 at night so we don't boil over.  Our little stove won't make it through the night, but an 85 degree kitchen is a nice thing to walk into after being outside.

(post #111566, reply #39 of 53)

You most certainly can. Its called a 'sleeve ' damper.


no problem

(post #111566, reply #38 of 53)

They don't have those cast steel butterfly type dampers still available on the market for thelooks.


 That  salesmen knew what he was talking about.  2 dampers (in/out)are twice as safe as one, anytime.


 Go for it, for the sake of $5 and 15 minutes to install, you'll be glad you did.

(post #111566, reply #5 of 53)

I have burnt wood for many years, airtight, 55 gal drums, wood/oil combinations and on all the wood stoves I have installed a damper. It gave me control over the air flow for the burn. Filling the stove up with wood and shutting it down just right, to keep the fire going as long and as hot as possible, was a well honed art. We would buy the damper separate punch a couple of holes in the pipe, usually the section above the stove, and install the damper.

(post #111566, reply #7 of 53)

AH HA..me too..this one came with the dampr in the flue collar..my old "SOTZ" never had that..I ALWAYS put one in..the flue pipe about a foot above the fire box ( I used old water heaters after the first drum got iffy)...

The Sotz was better rig IMO..this one has issues. but for under a c-note, whos ta [CUTE LITTLE PUPPY]?

 


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(post #111566, reply #11 of 53)

Damp it down. That thing sounds like its about to suck the furniture out of the house. It's not an airtight, so  invented central heat.it's letting a lot more heat than is necessary go up the flue. Check your flue when the fire has burnt low and see if you're getting significant build up in the pipe. If you are quit using the damper. Experiment. A flue damper turned 1/4 of the way may be just the ticket.


I invented central heat.


 

(post #111566, reply #15 of 53)

Yo..I hadda move the pipe thermometer WAY up from the barrel...it kept reading "over fire" too close to the stove..the barrel glows when the ash door is open..but 90% of the time my stack temp is lower than 300 of them little circles I can't make..12' above the stove.

The thing is the damper at the stove is TOO good..it drops my stack temps to , too low...read creosote..but the wood is way good..really good..

gotta fan on it, duh..mebbe I FU'd that reading..
anyway, it's. doing all it can, and IF I damp it down ( the stack damper) with the feed ports open..it won't do the job..in other words, the PIPE is radiating a lot of heat, that damper..will kill a lot of stack temp. which I need...

BTW Sam T sent me a cap..don't make one.

 


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(post #111566, reply #6 of 53)

Neither of my stoves has a damper.  The large shop one gets a lot of use and is hardly air-tight.  I see no reason for a damper.  Both stoves have enough intake control to work fine.


Those seeds still on the way?  I'm waitin' for an address.  John's in Richmond now.


PAHS Designer/Builder- Bury it!

PAHS works.  Bury it.

(post #111566, reply #9 of 53)

UH, the seeds are here..iffin John and I hook up..I givem to him?

I had a "mail splurge" lost a bunch o' addys..wanna re-send the snail mail in case he or I are whacked by xmas deals?

plenty o' seeds..frezze dried..LOL

 


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(post #111566, reply #8 of 53)

Yea deal me in here .


On a barrel stove kit , it should offer a sealed door with gasket. Actually its a better addition to that stove to put a baffle 6 inches from the top inside and stopping 6 inches short of the front of that stove. That would set up the S flow and would give a higher residence time to burn the violates, providing a cleaner burn and giving out more btu per cord. In the event it was a sealed door , a damper isnt necesary . The damper is used in stoves that are not tight and draft too much air to sustain steady long burns. Ive had several stoves that needed a damper but even them they wouldnt hold a fire all night long. Of course in those days the house was likely to be drafty as it would be in some barns and shops that use the drafty stoves. So a few feeding per night was norm.  The barrel  with a smoke shelf is a good stove as long as its tight at the door. .


Tim Mooney

 

(post #111566, reply #12 of 53)

Tim, this is the "highre" end of the Vogelsang..gaskets on both the feed door and ash dump door...I recemented the gaskets due to it FALLING OUT of the channel

My old Sotz was no gasket and I think much more effiecient, one door, overlay style, stamped instead of cast steel..it was the only thing that survived the fire in my shop..but it got "lost" in the new move last yr.

Drafty house huh? Ya shoulda asked IMERC..LOL

I agree with you, the looser the door, the more important the damper control..THANKS

 


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(post #111566, reply #19 of 53)

Ah the drafty stoves and houses were when I was a lad . Im an old gent now . It was years ago.


Tim Mooney

 

(post #111566, reply #13 of 53)

Have heated with wood 30 yrs and installed and used a damper on all sorts of wood stoves.  I think it helps control the burn, keeping as much heat in the stove to heat the mass and allowing you to shut 'er down to a slow roar..........watch that creosote producing temp......


Have a pipe thermostat on the shop stove, you can watch the temp rise fall with the dampening, don't much mess with the firebox vent until shutting it down for slow burn.


Only use it on the masonry heater to close off the flue after the burn is complete.  There you want hot complete wood and gas burn.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



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(post #111566, reply #17 of 53)

Thanks and not to mention a Mas flue needs a LOT more heat to draw at first, and to stay clean.

Cal, this was/is a sample of experiances ...yes, I BTDT with many stoves, just kinda wanted a perspective..yours is very similar to my past "involvements".

I think, tho' that I am heating KY , with my outrageous "vented" house, and my calcs. have gone awry...funny huh?

I have about 16' single wall, to 8' insul ( in the chase) but, the single wall is in an area that is NOT well inulated ( or in the warm envelope, of the house) therefore the use of single wall may not have been wise, BUT with more insulation and proper vapor stop..I might pull it off..

Ya gott abe here to see it..and we are having unusual cold( as you are too)..

wanna trade houses? LOL

 


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(post #111566, reply #21 of 53)

no thanks duane.


I'm 6 blocks from the bar, 5 blocks from the ice cream store, and 4 blocks for the church when they want to plant me.


And still in the woods.  Gotta love it.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #111566, reply #24 of 53)

C'est BON!

remember,,,,,,"it aint life that sucks, it's thinking that life sucks.....

you are my hero..wheres that bar from here?

 


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations. 


 


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #111566, reply #26 of 53)

Well, from here to there plus 6 blocks more or less.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



Quittin' Time

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #111566, reply #28 of 53)

walkin or stumbling?

damn hi jack bastids..

 


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


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(post #111566, reply #16 of 53)

 On most "normal" wood burning stoves ,the incoming air can be adjusted so  it will 'slow' down the burn if its too intense.


 But where are you IF the incoming adjustment damper goes on the plink?


Without that 'butterfly damper' you could be in heated trouble.


  The butterfly or flipper damper is another safety factor when it comes to wood burning.


This type of damper costs approx $ 5. and takes 5 mins. to install.


Not too much for a little added safety.

(post #111566, reply #18 of 53)

That was the most sensible thing you have ever posted..good on ya!!!

Keep it up, ya might find a girl. (G)

 


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations. 


 


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #111566, reply #20 of 53)

" But where are you IF the incoming adjustment damper goes on the plink?"

Answer - in deep, very deep, doo-doo!

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...