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1/2 drywall on the ceiling?!

JohnT8's picture

The current drywall hanger bid 1/2" for the ceilings.  I asked him about it and he said it was a fiber reinforced drywall...


I'm not familiar with this product.  Anyone else using 1/2" out there?


 


jt8


jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #83957, reply #1 of 29)

I've used 1/2" on ceilings my whole career- over 30 years.


I've only used 5/8" when required by fire code, mostly in garages and stores.


But virtually all of the framing that I've used 1/2" for is 16" OC. 1/2" is plenty stiff for that span.

(post #83957, reply #2 of 29)

Maybe I'm the oddball then.  I've always put 1/2 on walls and 5/8 on ceilings.


 


jt8


jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #83957, reply #3 of 29)

Its probably a regional thing.


 I almost never see 5/8" on ceilings, tho I've heard rumors about it.


Plus I like to hang the longest sheets possible for ceilings, to minimize any butt joints.


I can easily get 1/2" in 16' . My back starts hurting just thinking about trying to hang a 4' x 16' x 5/8" board.


fortunately, I rarely hang anything more than 10' these days.

(post #83957, reply #6 of 29)

"I've always put 1/2 on walls and 5/8 on ceilings."


That's exactly the opposite of what I've always done. I like the heavier, stiffer stuff on the walls so they're more solid, and the lighter stuff on the ceilings 'cause the heavier stuff is, well, heavy.


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #83957, reply #7 of 29)

Our code requires 5/8" if the joists are 24" on center.  We can use 1/2" if they are on 16" centers.


You get out of life what you put into it......minus taxes.


Marv


Edited 9/19/2008 9:11 am by Marv

You get out of life what you put into it......minus taxes.

Marv

(post #83957, reply #28 of 29)

     Don't you find that this creates problems regarding wall thickness for casing windows and doors? Standard window is    4-9/16" deep ( I find this could be made 4-5/8ths, the window NEVER sticks in too far, but often isn't in far enough). I would think you're beating a lot of plaster, or making some kind of thin extension for windows. Solid jamb door stock is 4-5/8 or thereabouts, your interior walls would be 4-3/4 before skim coat.....


       Just curious as to how you address that.


Bing

(post #83957, reply #29 of 29)

Almost everything I do is renovations -- rarely new construction. I find that the 5/8" is actually closer to the thickness of the old plaster/lath, so it fits existing better than using 1/2". Still, I've gotten pretty good at installing jam extensions and "tweaking" casings. ;-)


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #83957, reply #4 of 29)

around here 5/8 is used on the clg alot, but they have a 1/2 ceiling board [some call it sag resitant] that is made for clgs. i have used it  some,so far so good. you will no for sure when it's delevred,it will say right on the end paper.larry


if a man speaks in the forest,and there's not a woman to hear him,is he still wrong?


Edited 9/17/2008 4:07 pm by alwaysoverbudget

the older i get ,

the more people tick me off

(post #83957, reply #5 of 29)

We use 1/2" ceiling board all the time, look for the label when they stock. It about $1.5 a sheet more around here.

(post #83957, reply #8 of 29)

Going from memory, there's been talk here on BT about some kind of 1/2" drywall that's designed for 24" O.C. ceiling use. But I couldn't tell you the name or any details offhand.

Did you ever talk to Gregg?

He who dies with the most toys is dead. He who has the most fun with with his toys wins.

(post #83957, reply #9 of 29)

Did you ever talk to Gregg?


The 'project manager' has been making the drywall calls.  I just show up when I'm told someone is going to be there.  I'm not positive, but I don't think she has.  The 4 week backlog is a hair longer than I'd like.  I'm hoping to be ready within 2 weeks (of course if we'd called when you first gave us the #, that would have put us at the 4 week mark). 


So far we've heard anything from "I can start Monday" to 6 weeks backlog.  I'd kinda like one more bid before pulling the trigger.  I think we have two who haven't replied back yet. 


jt8


jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #83957, reply #17 of 29)

You are correct, it is type C board, and it is fire rated.


http://www.americangypsum.com/data/products/FireBloc_TypeC1.pdf


                            Mike


    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

                            Mike

    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

(post #83957, reply #18 of 29)

Thanks for the link.

I thought it was interesting that it said the 1/2" stuff should not support more than 1.3 PSF of insulation when supported 24" O.C.

But I dn't really know how much insulation weighs, so I don't know if that would be significant or not...

Men like to barbecue. Men will cook if danger is involved.

(post #83957, reply #19 of 29)

>>I dn't really know how much insulation weighs, so I don't know if that would be significant or not...<<

Well, when blowing cellulose I aim for 3.5 lbs/cu. ft. I use 5/8" on cielings, 16" OC.

Steve

(post #83957, reply #20 of 29)

That is interesting, seems like it would cause sag. I don't really see an advantage of 1/2" over 5/8" on ceilings, but the product is out there.

                            Mike


    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

                            Mike

    Small wheel turn by the fire and rod, big wheel turn by the grace of god.

(post #83957, reply #10 of 29)

John


  1/2 inch regular sheet rock is normal around here for ceilings... I'll use 5/8ths only where required (like in garages over living spaces)..

(post #83957, reply #13 of 29)

(like in garages over living spaces)..


How many garages over living spaces have you done????

(post #83957, reply #21 of 29)

Ozlander


  Ever hear of a tuck under garage?   Most town houses have them as well 90% of all split levels..


 I could go on but hopefully I've made my point..

(post #83957, reply #24 of 29)

Most town houses have the garage over a living space. I didn't know that. Must be a regional thing.

(post #83957, reply #25 of 29)

Ozlander ,


 Living space over the garage. 

(post #83957, reply #26 of 29)

Anyone that straps their ceilings,   when using standard 1/2" drywall did you space at 16" OC or less (perhaps 12" OC) ?


Thicker and/or stronger ceiling rock would then allow wider spacing if your *were* using 12" OC.  Less materials and less nailing/screwing/taping.


 


 


 


Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

 

Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

(post #83957, reply #27 of 29)

Your absolutely right about 1/2' on 24" o.c. As soon as acoustic is sprayed on, it sags. Also, there are a lot of bowled ceilings because the floor above was loaded with drywall.

(post #83957, reply #11 of 29)

Are we the odd ones?  We've used 1/2" on ceilings with joists 24" apart for years.  Garages 5/8".

(post #83957, reply #12 of 29)

Nope done all the time around here.

(post #83957, reply #14 of 29)

1/2" on everything here in NY (LI) BUT...if it were my own house? I'd use 5/8" from now on. More soundproof...spans any crowned 2x better....


Spoke with my drywall sub just last week about that and he said it'd only be pennies more in material to hang and no more in labor. He agreed with me that it's a superior way to rock a house.


If I have to do it alone or with a helper I don't care about the weight being I have a panel lift i bought offa Craig's list for $90 a ways back....the nice Telpro ($700) heavy duty lift. How'd I ever live with out one!!!!



 


 


 


HTTP://WWW.CLIFFORDRENOVATIONS.COM


http://www.ramdass.org


"I am Andybuildz and I approve this post"

(post #83957, reply #16 of 29)

5/8" only in NYC, fire code. Though I used 5/8" everywhere in my house on the island too.

(post #83957, reply #15 of 29)

There is a 1/2" 4x12 product usually referred to as 'ceiling board.'


All sheetrock has fiber reinforcement.  Perhaps 'ceiling board' has more, or it is oriented differently.


Myron Ferguson would know!


 

(post #83957, reply #22 of 29)

1/2 inch fiber board is probably one of the newest drywalls out there thats being sold in great quanities.


The deal is on 2 ft centers on ceilings as you probably already know regualar 1/2 inch drywall will sag depending on how much insultion is placed on it and if it gets wet  while the wait is on it . We used to blow 50 galllons of water  per 1000 sq ft of  acoustic texture on celings and they would look like upside down rainbows in half inch board on two feet centers. That was the old days .


5/8s came along and fixed the problem. Plus is upped the fire rating commercial applications need. All 5/8s that I remember was fiber board . None of it was regular rock.


So heres the problem. 5/8s has caused some serious inguries to hangers because we carry the weight on our heads at some point . Its very heavy for two people to lift it up in 12 ft from the floor to the ceiling. That is necesary. Most of the time the third person steps up under the middle as a spot nailer and hold the middle but the weight is on the two out side men. Its caused many neck and spine injuries that have been trade ending jobs. Too many people hung it with just two people also. You have to work so if Bill doesnt show up or if you dont have a Bill you hang it .


I could have been remmedied by hanging 8s instead of 12s but tapers would not have it . I charged a third more to finish 8s and no one wanted to pay it . That ruled 8s out .


So I suspect here came 1/2 inch fiber board which was in between weights of normal 1/2 and 5/8 s fiber . It wont sag on two feet centers if it doesnt get terribly wet . Water is used to bend drywall so keep that in mind. We dont use acoustical texture any more so it works . Normally drywall is finished slick to a very light mud texture that drys in a few hours. Accoustical used to be wet the next day. Lots of difference in drying times and the amount of water used. Differnce of probably 5 gallons to 50 gallons per 1000 sq ft. Because of that and not loading the ceiling with insulation till after the ceiling is done makes 1/2 inch fiber work.


Tim


 

 

(post #83957, reply #23 of 29)

I'm not a sheetrocker. When I do it, it's usually alone. I rent a lift and use the longest pieces of 5/8 I can get for ceilings. I suppose with multiple people, manpower is faster than a lift, but I swore off t-braces and neck-aches about 15 years ago...

Steve