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Can I reuse frozen paint after it dethaw

Truck8's picture

I moved from hot Florida to the Tennessee mountains this year and though I look forward to the winter here, I would love to know of any experience with paint products (latex or oil) that have been frozen and later thawed, since warnings on the label say don't freeze.  It seems to me that if slowly dethawed it would be reusable.  Anybody with experience on this. Thanks

(post #63500, reply #1 of 15)

  I think oils are OK .


  There's something in latex paint that changes once its been frozen.


  IMO, its not worth even experimenting.  Get some new paint and do the job only once.

(post #63500, reply #2 of 15)

The answer is ..depends. The paint may survive 2 or 3 freeze-thaw cycles, or none, depending on the quality of the paint to begin with. If you want to see, thaw it slowly and stir the paint. If it's smooth, has a good consistency and the color seems right, it may be alright to use.


If it has gone bad, there will be a separation of ingredients and/or it will appear lumpy. It can also affect the sheen level.


 


or you can buy new paint..and keep it warm.


Barry E-Remodeler

 


Barry E-Remodeler  

(post #63500, reply #3 of 15)

You can't use paint that DETHAWs because it will then be frozen again.

(post #63500, reply #4 of 15)

T8,


Chuck it...get new.

(post #63500, reply #5 of 15)

You should be able to find a 1-800 # for the company to contact their tech dept. Most latex paints can survive a certain number of freeze/thaw cycles - anywhere from two to twenty.

Seat of the pants method for knowing - if it has sweparated in the can, through it out, if it has an ammonia type odor, throw it out.

 

 


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(post #63500, reply #8 of 15)

I sat through a Sherrwin Williams class for some continuing education credits this week and the rep said pretty much exactly what you just said. He also said that the more expensive paints have better stablilizers in them to prevent seperation during a freeze/thaw cycle, so if it's cheap paint to start with it's more likely to be bad once it thaws.

 

 

 

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(post #63500, reply #9 of 15)

What is separated paint like? Is it when there is some water or oil-looking liquid on top?

(post #63500, reply #10 of 15)

"What is separated paint like? Is it when there is some water or oil-looking liquid on top?"


DH2,


That can be normal also...why do you think they always shake it? You can usually see that the paint is toast when it will not blend to a smooth consistancy. But, even when smooth, previously frozen paint can have the dryer's compromized, and therefore be junk! Don't waste your time and don't take the risk. Chuck-it and get new! It's your time.


Peace


 


 

(post #63500, reply #14 of 15)

It's nice to know the SW reps are keeping up with me.

<G,D,& R>

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #63500, reply #6 of 15)

I dont want to sound nasty or nuttin' but.....are you kidding me?
The price of a can of paint vs. all the work under it and what it would take to undo it all....is it really worth even the tinest of thought?
I almost didnt answer this question because it sounded like some cheap homeowner was asking it fer a change...I don't mean to sound nasty but c'mon bro!
Be clean fresh and new....do the job right !!!
andy

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(post #63500, reply #7 of 15)

A dollar sez he's thinking fence and shed.

 

 

(post #63500, reply #11 of 15)

Family anecdote

My father worked for a railroad. one of his jobs was to test materials before the railway made bulk perchases. Over the years he brought home hundreds of quarts of paint that had been discarded after the test procedure was finished. Some of this paint, all oil based, ended up in an uninsulated shed for what, 15... 20 years or more. We still use the locomotive orange to touch up and paint the shutters and exterior trim at the cottage.

I last did it two years ago. The paint worked out just fine, after stirring it had the same consistency as new oil based paint. There were no application problems and it seems to holding up well.

An ex-boat builder treading water!
An ex-boat builder treading water!

(post #63500, reply #12 of 15)

but Bob, that paint was made a lot differently back then.

Today's paints have improved in certain areas, but without the lead and some of the other nasty things taken out for our health their performance has, at times, suffered.

It is an on-going battle for the chemists.

Norm

(post #63500, reply #13 of 15)

Hmmm good point!

An ex-boat builder treading water!

An ex-boat builder treading water!

(post #63500, reply #15 of 15)

Can I reuse frozen paint after it dethaw

It seems to me that if slowly dethawed it would be reusable.

Well, I was going to let the title go. Intentionally regarding "frozen", and "dethawed" the same as two negatives cancelling each other out.

But then you want to "slowly dethaw" it again. So, you have frozen paint. (And it was frozen and thawed somewhere there in the middle, so it's frozen at least twice.)

But now, you want to "reuse" it.

I can't see how you can use frozen paint in the first place, let alone reuse it...

Unless you intend to use it as a step ? A weapon ? An ice cube to cool down the swimming pool ?

In which case, as a step, it'll last as long as it is cold enough, you keep it out of direct sunlight, and you don't put too much weight on it. So, you might be able to reuse it there.

As a weapon, well, I guess it's possible to reuse it there as well.

As a swimming pool ice cube, I think it's probably going to be pretty much useless after you use it the first time. So no reuse there...

;)

:)

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