Search the forums

Loading

Choice of Work Gloves

trusche2's picture

Greetings,

 

What are your choices for insulated work gloves that have enough flexibility to provide a good grip on power tools as well as hand tools, and keep your hands from getting numb from the cold weather.

Best regards,

trusche2

Rather than new gloves, get (post #207224, reply #1 of 13)

Rather than new gloves, get some polypropyline glove liners -- http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/stores...

You wear them under regular gloves (they're surprisingly warm) and can take off the regular gloves but leave these on to do fine work.  I keep a pair in all my jackets -- they've very low bulk.


(Why doesn't resizing the image have any real effect?)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Dan (post #207224, reply #2 of 13)

first, where are they offered.  Most I see around here on display-leather, those rubberized stretch type things that do little to warm your hands except in the summer, and regular brown cloth.

Second, you know the answer on why something doesn't work..............

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Well mostly you have to buy (post #207224, reply #3 of 13)

Well mostly you have to buy them mail-order (see the page I linked).  But you do occasionally see them at well-equipped bike shops.


Note that they're incredibly cheap.  (Not too durable, though, if you wear them "bare" -- they snag easily.)

I was wearing a pair this morning, snowblowing.  They were real nice to have on when I had to take off my mittens to gas up the blower.

Edit:  I see that link went bad again.  That site tends to do that.  I'll try to find another link.

This appears to be the same thing, only about a dollar more a pair: http://www.karstsports.com/polglovlin.ht...


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Liners: Where to buy (post #207224, reply #4 of 13)

Good outdoor shops.  Locally I can find them at the rafting and kayak store, the sporting goods store that does hunting and fishing gear, the boot shop (where they will make you real gloves to go over them), the local lumber yard, the ALCO (think jumior Walmart for small towns without enough people to attract a Walmart), and the grocery store.  Amazon has huge selection.  Cabella's and Bass Pro Shops, Cheaper than Dirt, and REI, all have them. 

Personally, I buy the ones from smart wool instead of poly.  I haven't worn poly since the attack on the HMS Sheffeild, where 90% of the casualties were from burns where the flash heat from the explosion fused the new poly winter underwear to the Royal Marines.  If they had been wearing the old winter uniform consisting of wool over silk, instead of the new uniform of polyester over polypropylene, ( issued for the Falklands campaign), 70% of them would have been combat ready within hours, instead of dead or scarred for life. 

thanks Jigs (post #207224, reply #6 of 13)

I don't think I'll be around any armaments and do have wool, but looking for something else to try.

 

I tried our local Basspro-zip.

I see that HF has something-might stop there for the first time in my life tomorrow.

 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


You often find something that (post #207224, reply #7 of 13)

You often find something that looks the same but is made of cotton.  Those are useless.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Roger (post #207224, reply #8 of 13)

http://www.harborfreight.com/polypropylene-gloves-6-pair-30415.html

I don't see that they are form fitted, so probably not going to cut it for a liner,

but I'll bite my tongue and go into that place for the first time.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Those look a little (post #207224, reply #9 of 13)

Those look a little suspicious -- they look to be bulkier than the ones I use, and kind of have a cotton look to them.  But the price is right.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Old carpenter perspective.. (post #207224, reply #5 of 13)

I use the polypro liners [military surplus] under cotton jersey gloves when feasible. I can still pick up a screw or a nail and place it with that set up. .

 

Colder weather requiring heavier gloves, I might as well stay home productivity wise.  

 

Nerve damage has  made these old paws cold sensitive.

.

The answer depends mostly on (post #207224, reply #10 of 13)

The answer depends mostly on exactly what work you do. I do electric work.

For me, simple cotton string-knit gloves work best. Pay extra for simple cotton; polyester (added for strength) is slicker, and a hot light bulb will melt it.

I carry at least a dozen pairs in the truck. The gloves get dirty, and they wear out. More important, they are no good if they are wet. A pair gets wet, you replace it. On the weekend, the whole mess gets run through the laundry.

The stretchy cheap acrylic gloves that pop up in every store this time of year are too slippery for a good grip. Plus, they melt easily, and get wet even easier than the cotton gloves.

When dry, the simple cotton is surprisingly warm. You can use them as 'liners' in simple leather or rubber gloves as well. You can double them up for extreme cold, but you lose a lot of mobility.

Ninja Ice Gloves (post #207224, reply #11 of 13)

Check out Ninja Ice Gloves You can find them on amazon for around 8 bucks They keep your hands warm but arent so bulky you cant use your hands. They are also some what water resistent. They are the best ive been able to find and they last for a while depending on the work you do 

As you can see from the (post #207224, reply #12 of 13)

As you can see from the previous posts, "it depends" is the most common answer.

What's cold for you? Here in Canada we sometimes have people framing houses at -40 degrees. You ain't going to be wearing light cotton gloves in those conditions.

But for middle-of-the road work gloves in cold temps I start with something like this:

http://www.watsongloves.com/catalogdetai...

...which has good grip and nice fit to the hand. Then as temperatures fall I'll use a larger version of this glove with a synthetic liner or liners. In our climate (not much lower than -10 degrees C) I've always been able to swing a hammer and squeeze a circ saw switch.

scott (post #207224, reply #13 of 13)

I checked the link, I see these knit with rubbery dunked fingers/palm are more than what I've seen around here-they say they're lined-insulated.

I also could not find a US distributor.  Any idea if they are available here or perhaps can be ordered/shipped?  They do have a prescence in Ontario which is just across the lake from here. 

Do they float?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/