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Covered Stoop

byrd48's picture

Hi,

I have an entry door that needs a stoop and steps.  I ripped out the old rotted deck that was there before and I would like to replace it with a smaller stoop, maybe 4x4 with steps that run parallel to the house.  I would also like it to be covered to protect it from the weather and the pecan tree nearby.  I would like ideas on how to cover it. I was thinking of a lean to concept like this: http://extremehowto.com/build-an-attached-carport/

but obviously smaller and maybe not as ugly.  My question with this approach would be, could the same posts that support the roof also support the stoop platform  And should it attach to the house underneath the existing eaves (so gutters could run across the top), or would it make more sense to cut out the eaves and just extend the roof in that section?  I think putting it under the eaves makes it less part of the house (ie: it can be removed without messing with the main roof.  

Also, I'll be replacing the siding on the house as part of the project.  I like the board and batten style and was wondering about the Hardi siding.  I know they carry the wide panels, but I was thinking of the standard planks hung vertically.  In that scenario, I'm not sure what to use as the battens, I did not see any of those from Hardi.

Thanks in advance, a photo of the house is below:

Jon

 

https://goo.gl/photos/8G6W2MsLrJNwfAA39

continue the roof line (post #215127, reply #1 of 2)

...could the same posts that support the roof also support the stoop platform

Yes. The posts need to be securely attached to some kind of a footing. If you use treated lumber, DON'T use a 4x4, because it will twist with time. Use a 6x6. If the post rests atop a footer that is 8" above grade, you can use cedar. Be sure to prime the bottom of the post. There are other ways to build durable support posts.

 And should it (the roof) attach to the house underneath the existing eaves (so gutters could run across the top), or would it make more sense to cut out the eaves and just extend the roof in that section?  

The gutter is under a tree. It will need more than periodic cleaning in order to function properly. If the new roof is installed underneath the eaves you may encounter difficulty installing the last few rows of roofing material. In the long run, debris could build up there. Birds will get in from the sides and build their nests. Squirrels may find this area attractive too, unless you box it out. If you decide to build underneath the eaves, take off the gutter and add a long, continuous piece of L-flashing that bridges the new roof and runs up the main house facia and under the gutter apron. Then put the gutter back on. Depending on the age of the existing roof, I might suggest you frame the new roof as an extension of the existing roof.

I think putting it under the eaves makes it less part of the house (ie: it can be removed without messing with the main roof.  If you want to pursue the path of least resistance, attach the roof under the eaves. I'm not convinced this looks appealing, but it is the simplest way to go. I think the better option is to cut out the overhang and lay/fasten your new rafters on the exterior wall of the house. Since your stoop is small and entry is from the side of the house, the new rafters can be pitched to match the roof. You don't mention the condition of the existing shingles. Though I can't see the roof, the photo suggests to me that your roof may need re-shingling.

Also, I'll be replacing the siding on the house as part of the project.  I like the board and batten style and was wondering about the Hardi siding.  I know they carry the wide panels, but I was thinking of the standard planks hung vertically.  In that scenario, I'm not sure what to use as the battens, I did not see any of those from Hardi.

I've done this with good results. Keep in mind that Hardi's product warranty may not apply. To make this method work you need to be mindful of several details. 1) You need to install horizontal nailers every 16"-19". You will need to fill the voids between the nailers so that each Hardi-board is supported across its full length. Leave a small expansion joint between adjacent Hardi-boards. Fill gaps with a high-quality, durable caulk. Your battens can be made from 5/4 Hardi trim boards, run through your saw (fitted with a riving blade), but this is a messy proposition. I prefer to use composite trim material. Preferably this stuff is available in 1x3s x the height of the walls. Avoid laps. Avoid butt-jointing Hardi siding. If must Hardi butt joint, either caulk the joint well or custom make a small z-flashing which, when painted, will hardly show. 

I rarely use prefinished Hardi siding, prefering to to all my caulking prior to painting. Sherwin Williams Duration paint works extremely well for this particular application. Here in IL, I give my clients a 20 yr paint warranty. So far, so good.

Mel Fros froscarpentry.com

Hi Mel, Thank you so much (post #215127, reply #2 of 2)

Hi Mel,

Thank you so much for all the great information. I apologize for being so long in responding.  I was wondering, why would you need horizontal nailers to install the hardi planks vertically?  Could they not be nailed directly to the house?  I was thinking there would be maybe a nails width spacing between each board to make sure each course is plumb, but they should not expand / contract like wood siding I wouldn't think.

As for the battens, I saw on the Hardi site that they offer 3 inch wide planks that are the same thickness as the siding planks, but I be those would be tricky to work with and transport without breaking them.  I would imagine I could use wood boards for the battens as well?

Thanks again!

Jon