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Drilled hole in PVC Drain

WE's picture

While hanging a shelf, I recently mistakenly drilled two holes in a PVC drain pipe that was tight against the sheetrock. The finished wall is papered and it would be a mess to cut out the sheetrock to plug the 1/4" holes. Is there a viable fix?

Thanks,
Walt

(post #88201, reply #1 of 24)

Cut the sheetrock, fix the pipe right by cutting out and replacing the punctured section, patch the sheetrock, hang your shelf and set something BIG on the the shelf. :-)

(post #88201, reply #2 of 24)

Pour some fix-a-flat down your toilet?


 


Just kidding, I don't know an easy fix.  Sounds like something I'd do though.

(post #88201, reply #3 of 24)

Is the pipe vertical or horizontal, and is it a drain from a fixture above, or a vent going to the roof?

(post #88201, reply #4 of 24)

The pipe is a vertical drain.

The fix-a-flat idea is novel, but I had something a bit more permanent in mind.

Specifically, is I used a plug cutter and made a small plug from another piece of pipe, then primed and glued the plug in place, would that suffice? It would be a bit like model building, and I would have to buy the plug cutter, but it would save not only the drywall work, but more importantly re-wallpapering the whole room.

Thanks guys,
Walt

(post #88201, reply #5 of 24)

Depending on the size you may be able to cut a "patch" from the next larger size or a coupling of the same size and glue it over the holes.  There's no pressure to speak of in a drain so it should do just fine...

(post #88201, reply #22 of 24)

A fitting for that size of pipe will patch right over the hole.


Just go buy a fitting and cut a patch out of it.


Just make sure that you use plenty of glue so the two pieces melt together.


That is one of the nice things about some plastics.


"There are three kinds of men: The one that learns by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."
Will Rogers


Edited 10/27/2009 11:46 pm by popawheelie

______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ There are three kinds of men: The one that learns by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

(post #88201, reply #8 of 24)

   Take a length of the same size pipe a few inches longer than the hole and split it lengthwise. Prime and glue it  (also prime and apply glue to the pipe)  to the pipe. If you cut the patch slightly off center so it is more of a "C" shape it will snap over and self clamp otherwise hold tight till the glue sets.

(post #88201, reply #9 of 24)

If you are going that way (patch) use a coupling so it is the right ID.

Greg

(post #88201, reply #6 of 24)

Epoxy ...
or, if this is sch 40, tap them and put a couple 5/16 stainless machine screws in the holes. Just be sure they are short ones that do not protrude into the pipe.


Edited 10/27/2009 11:36 am ET by gfretwell

Greg

(post #88201, reply #7 of 24)

I like the tapping and stainless machine screw idea, including epoxy. Is there a downside that I'm missing?

Thanks,
Walt

(post #88201, reply #10 of 24)

About all I can think of that MIGHT work is a hot-melt glue gun. There's so much that can go wrong, though, that I think you really need to open up either side of the wall and do it right.


"Doing it right" means cutting out the damaged section, and replace it using 'slip couplings' (couplings without the inside lip).

(post #88201, reply #11 of 24)

Thanks for all the feedback. Based on your suggestions, I'm going to 'do both'. For the short term, I'll tap and screw the holes with epoxy. However, about a year from now, I'll be doing some remodeling on the other side of the wall at which time I'll be in a position to properly fix the holes with a repair coupling. If the tap and screw doesn't work, I'll be able to tell quickly and tear out the back side sooner than I wanted.

Best,
Walt

(post #88201, reply #12 of 24)

I bet that screw approach would work and work best if something expanding was around its threads. Gorilla glue or sumo glue with a touch of water expand quite well indeed. Just a smidge, though so that you're not expanding into the pipe to any real degree.

(post #88201, reply #13 of 24)

Clothespin on your nose.


A strong nation, like a strong person, can afford to be gentle, firm, thoughtful, and restrained. It can afford to extend a helping hand to others. It's a weak nation, like a weak person, that must behave with bluster and boasting and rashness and other signs of insecurity. --Jimmy Carter


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #88201, reply #14 of 24)

Widen the hole in the DW to maybe 3/8". (WITHOUT widening the hole in the pipe!) Get a piece of pipe of the same type and cut/whittle/sand/grind a tapered plug to fit the hole. Make the plug extra long to begin with, so you have a "handle".

Test fit the plug several times and twist it around in the hole, then check the plug to be sure it shows a shiny mark around it's entire diameter where it was in the hole. Whittle/sand the plug until it fits tightly.

Cut the pointy end off the plug about 1/4" from the shiny ring, so that no more than about 1/8" will end up projecting into the pipe. Treat plug and hole with appropriate primer and solvent/adhesive, then install the plug.

After the plug has set for 12-24 hours, cut the plug off flush with the drywall. (I can't think of a good way to cut the plug off inside the wall, but if flush the bracket you're installing should hide the hole.)


A strong nation, like a strong person, can afford to be gentle, firm, thoughtful, and restrained. It can afford to extend a helping hand to others. It's a weak nation, like a weak person, that must behave with bluster and boasting and rashness and other signs of insecurity. --Jimmy Carter


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #88201, reply #15 of 24)

Another fix is to similarly enlarge the hole in the drywall and then drive in a pan-head sheet metal screw. Stainless is best, and the shortest one you can find to fit the hole. Coat the screw with epoxy before driving it in. You can use one of those screwdrivers with screw holders to do the install.


A strong nation, like a strong person, can afford to be gentle, firm, thoughtful, and restrained. It can afford to extend a helping hand to others. It's a weak nation, like a weak person, that must behave with bluster and boasting and rashness and other signs of insecurity. --Jimmy Carter


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #88201, reply #16 of 24)

I'd go as far as a lead wall anchor  ( the taperd ones for brick) and epox. THEN the screw.

Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #88201, reply #23 of 24)

Man, I thought you were gonna do your Billy Mayes schtick and recommend


MIGHTY PUTTY!


;-)


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #88201, reply #24 of 24)

New back meds, I was off of my game.


B'sides, like there really is some putty! LOL


Man, I had to kill an hour and half yesterday waiting on pharmacy at wallyworld, I think it was one of the levels of hell or purgatory. But i did actually learn a few things, like they do have GGlue and similar cheaper than Lowes.


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #88201, reply #17 of 24)

inject expoxy into the hole useing yur drilled hile in the wall...

 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!



Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!


 



"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #88201, reply #18 of 24)

DanH's plan is the best.  Glue in a tapered plug you fashion out of PVC.  It would be completely compatible and permanent.

(post #88201, reply #19 of 24)

make sure its not a vent pipe.  if it is you may not have anything to really repair but the wall unless it stinks too badly.


if it is a waste pipe..... i would try this.....   moisten the paper, score a small flap and peel it back.  carefully open the wall hole to say 1/2" and fabricate a patch made from a PVC coupling.  that way the radii match.  you could hot melt glue the patch to a pencil or golf tee to hold it and fish it into the hole.  make a paper mache wad and fill the wall hole and paste over the flap with thinned white glue and water mix.  depends upon the paper pattern to how well it will hide.


another thought is to hot melt glue the patch to a 1/2" dowell and cut off flush to the wall before gluing to the pipe.  add a wood screw to the end of the dowel to hold it while you fish it in.  when soild, remove the screw a paste over the flap.  the dowell should fit the hole well enough to hide the repair.  I would not let the flap dry out.  keep moist but not soggy or that is another problem.  work fast.


a screw or plug could make a protruding waste catcher in the line and that is something i would want to avoid.  in general a waste line is under little pressure as compared to a water pipe so a well glued patch should hold.  could try a 3/4" round to get a larger bonding surface.  a piece of scotch brite hot melt glued to a stick would roughen it to accept the PVC cement.


 


facmx in nc


 


 


 

(post #88201, reply #21 of 24)

If you go the epoxy route, pool supply places have pvc epoxy. It is rated for light pressure and will set underwater.


Comes in a stick, cut, knead, apply, done.


I'd trust it, but i'm here and your there! matt


 


edit: what Jeff said


 


 


 


Edited 10/27/2009 11:23 pm ET by matty j