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Edge Detail for Wood-Edged Laminate Countertops

JIMMIEM's picture

I'm making replacement countertops for my kitchen.  I'll use laminate and wrap the edges with Red Oak.  The corners will be radiused.  The edges will have a no-drip edge...similar to what the no-drip edge on a postformed laminate countertop looks like.

I would like to use this wood no-drip edge on the sides of the countertops that abutt the stove on both sides.  The current laminate countertops have square edges that abutt the stove and liquids sometimes run down between the stove and countertop.  Any thoughts on this edge detail that will abutt the stove?

Laminate next to the stove. (post #214628, reply #1 of 14)

Laminate next to the stove. The heat and spilled grease, foods, etc will wtreck thenoak in no time.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

The oak trim will be (post #214628, reply #2 of 14)

The oak trim will be polyurethaned.

I assumed it would be and my (post #214628, reply #4 of 14)

I assumed it would be and my answer was predicated on that. Why would you risk it? If it fails you'll be 3/4" short on each side and have to remake the the tops on both sides.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

I was going to use an oil (post #214628, reply #6 of 14)

I was going to use an oil based flooring poly....really tough stuff.  One side of the stove will just have a small countertop and it gets most of the spills.....so an easy redo if it fails.  The other side of the stove is abutted by the main countertop but it doesn't see many spills as the coffee maker lives there.

I made custom maple edging (post #214628, reply #3 of 14)

I made custom maple edging for my laminate counters including both sides of the stove.  No issues and it made the gap between the stove a little tighter so less stuff falls end up passing the opening.

Did you do a drip edge?  (post #214628, reply #5 of 14)

Did you do a drip edge?  Could you post a picture?  Did you radius the corners?

Here is the detail: (post #214628, reply #7 of 14)

Here is the detail:

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Thank You for posting.  Same (post #214628, reply #9 of 14)

Thank You for posting.  Same edge detail throughout the kitchen?  How high above the laminate surface does the edging extend?

Jim (post #214628, reply #10 of 14)

JIMMIEM wrote:

Thank You for posting.  Same edge detail throughout the kitchen?  How high above the laminate surface does the edging extend?

 

Way too much in my opinion.  That post formed laminate counter edge you mention early on does keep some spills on the counter.  It's seamless.

The wood edge just shown would be a damn that would certainly keep spills in place but it would also likely introduce a lot of seam for the liquid to try to penetrate as well as a long edge of gunk collection.

Further, I'd bet I would spill that glass on the floor when its bottom caught the edge.

 

Most wood edge laminate counters, the lam is laid over the wood then routed.  You use a detail profile to jazz it up and trim the lam all at once.  No water catching but no moisture penetration either.

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Hello Calvin.  Long time.  (post #214628, reply #11 of 14)

Hello Calvin.  Long time.  How have you been?  Did you ever get to really retire?

I have found a router bit that will form an edge profile similar to the raised edge profile on a post formed laminate counter top.  The bit is typically used to form the edge profile on a solid surface counter top.  The bit can be used on wood.  I know that the way you mention.....laminate over edge banding and then profile is the preferred method.  But in order to get the no-drip edge I have to apply the laminate first and then the wood and then route the no-drip edge.  I may regret doing it this way.....but I'll seal the joint really well and hopefully it will outlast me.    

lam edge @ stove for me (post #214628, reply #8 of 14)

I'm with FL on this, laminate next to the stove. I prefer to cap the ends there with lam also.

At my own stove I use those little t shaped metal filler strips  which I really like. You can just pull them right up to clean and they make a decent defense against stuff running down when in place.

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The laminate is 1/4" below (post #214628, reply #12 of 14)

The laminate is 1/4" below the high point of the molding.  We only have one 11 foot counter so it is a dog leg along the peninsula, then a run to the stove with a slight leg before the stove.  On the right side of the stove there is a small 8 inch piece.  It all has the same molding.

The molding was stained and had multi coats of poly before being cut and applied.  Clear silicone was applied to the counter then the molding was pressed on and pinned with a 23 ga. pinner.

To date (now 5 years) there have been no issues with gunk collection or glasses falling as a result of the molding.  It may have prevented the cats from knocking something to the floor but I don't know for sure as they are not allowed on the counter. If, you know what I mean.

I used one piece of 5 X 10 foot laminate leaving one seam under a cabinet in a not often used space.  Because it was laminate over laminate I used solvent based contact cement with good ventilation from an induction fan (no sparks).

The big piece was rough cut and glued in the garage on a temporary counter setup. A couple dozen 3/8 inch dowels were placed on the counter to receive the big piece.  Then it was trimmed in place.

All this was done because the counter and upper/lower cabinets were built in place in 1959 and removal would have been difficult and out of our budget, not to mention spoiling the look of a country kitchen that looked great.  The planning did allow me to add a trim router to my collection of routers.

Thank You.  I'll need to do (post #214628, reply #13 of 14)

Thank You.  I'll need to do some laminate trimming.  Which trim router did you buy? 

I got the Bosch PR20EVSK and (post #214628, reply #14 of 14)

I got the Bosch PR20EVSK and a laminate trimmer kit.