Search the forums

Loading

Getting rid of orange peel texture?

rowsc's picture

My house was built four years ago by a creative home builder.  I live in a planned unit development so most of the neighborhoods are cookie cutter houses.  While our neighborhood has unique designs, the finish is all similar.  I want to backdate your  house so the finish is more in tune with the interior architecture.  Specifically, I want to replace the orange peel texture on the drywall with a smooth finish.  What is the best route?  I assume I can just skim it with sandpaper to make sure there are no high spots then trowel on a thin coat of plaster.  Can it be that simple?


Thanks,


Rich

(post #63908, reply #1 of 7)

Disclaimer:  I am a carpenter who has had a 15 year crash course in General Contracting.


 


From my experience expect one heck of a mess, unless you section off areas and clean as you go.  I have gone the sand-spot-skim coat route and it has always turned out nice.  It can be time consuming, but cranking the heat up, get plenty of materials (compound, dustmasks, sand paper (medium to fine), plastic, blue tape, radio).  Beware of areas around moundings, cabinetry.  Build up around these areas will require a whole lot of unnecessary sanding.  Depending on you total surface area, you'll need a whole bunch of compound b/c your adding b/w 3/32 to 1/8 thickness in places.


 


Good luck

(post #63908, reply #2 of 7)

Scrape...


skim coat with thinned topping mix...


sand...


prime...


do it all over again...



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #63908, reply #4 of 7)

Stripe the ceilings with yellow chalkline 10 inches apart to make this easy. The chaulk covers easy with paint.


Id run a 10 inch float box set "tight " to skim an even 10 inch path that will plane over the bumps very nicely. Skip every 10 inches for the second application. Fill that when the first is dry with a 12 inch box which will over lap and feather running the box tight. Sponge mop sand the edges and no dust or edges. Use topping mud if available for it glides under a wet sponge. No dust and very slick work.


You can do the same with 10 and 12 inch knifes working from a 12 inch pan. Just try to keep the angle of your knife the same to cover the same amount .


Tim Mooney

 

(post #63908, reply #6 of 7)

I like yur way better....


whatcha doing next week end????



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #63908, reply #7 of 7)

Got a new camera. How to get pics from "card " to infanveiw?


LOL, U commin back through?


Tim Mooney


Edited 12/26/2004 11:53 am ET by Tim Mooney

 

(post #63908, reply #3 of 7)

A skilled plasterer may be able to put on a nice veneer coat with no sanding.  Just a matter of if he can get enough 'tooth' on the substrate, perhaps with a bonding agent.


Also consider the feasibility of putting a layer of 3/8 board over the whole thing.

(post #63908, reply #5 of 7)

51303.1 


The EZ way.


YCF Dino